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Audioengine 2, not what I expected. - Page 4

post #46 of 67

I mean listening to music while sat at the computer - ie small enough to fit on a desk next to your monitor without taking over.

 

There may be better speakers out there though...

post #47 of 67

What you are describing is poor audio quality as a result of a lifestyle and budgetary choice that has nothing to do with the source material. There are many of us who choose to use bigger and better sounding speakers while sitting at the computer. For instance, here are Energy RC-10s in someone's computer setup. I used to have these on my desk, although now I have the higher up model, the Energy Veritas V5.1s (same size though) with a sub under my desk to fill in the lower bass. I get incredible "computer music" quality. 


Edited by cel4145 - 8/26/12 at 9:01am
post #48 of 67

I think you are mis-understanding me - "for me" they are great for what I need - and in no way am I underwhelmed with them like some people have said.  My quote about "computer music" was nothing to do with the source, I was merely stating that I use them connected to my PC to play back music - ie computer music - they are after all sold as a desktop multimedia speaker.

 

The speakers you have shown in both links are way too big for my liking.  But each to their own...  The RC-10s are also considerably more expensive than the A2s.

 

As I stated, I am sure there are other speakers out there that are better - but there are also many that are worse.  I am sure there are better speakers than the v5.1s - but that doesn't mean they are bad speakers.

 

In all honesty, it sounds a bit like a "my ones are better than your ones" kinda post - I may have gotten the wrong end of the stick though..

 

I have headphones for when I really want "incredible computer music quality" - but for day to day use, I would highly recommend the A2s.

post #49 of 67

People have different references and different standards simple as that.

 

As for "computer music" the terms refers to something else entirely.

 

Your use of the term seems to be based on where the music is played.

 

How about living room music, toilet music and office music ?

post #50 of 67

I was responding to your previous post where you defined "computer music" as

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gcwebbyuk View Post

I mean listening to music while sat at the computer - ie small enough to fit on a desk next to your monitor without taking over.

 

To reiterate, I was pointing out that your choice of speakers, quality, and their size is a "lifestyle and budgetary choice." It's not indicative of everyone's audio experience of listening to music at a computer or how we choose to perceive it. 

 

Meanwhile, if someone doesn't restrict their range of choices in the way you have, it's pretty easy to exceed the audio quality of the A2s for about the same budget. Find a used inexpensive receiver/amplifier, or go with an an inexpensive t-amp such as the Lepai. Then find some passive bookshelves with larger drivers either used or on sale. My first passive bookshelf/amp setup was a used Denon integrated amp, and some Cambridge Audio S30 speakers that I got as an open box buy, and it cost $230, only marginally more than your A2s.I came from Klipsch Promedia 2.1s (which have drivers bigger than the A2s). The Klipsch Promedia were for the longest time the best multimedia speakers one could buy under $200. The audio quality difference was dramatic. 

post #51 of 67

Oh, and I forgot to mention that the Energy RC-10s are only $220. Since it should be possible to buy a power source for about $100 more by going used, the RC-10s are not substantially more than the Audioengine A2s, at least not from a home audio perspective.  

post #52 of 67

If you own a pair of Audioengine 2s and isn't satisfied with the sound. Check if your power supply is running hot, or just slighly warm when you using your speakers. If so, i can almost guarantee that something is wrong with your power supply. Ask audioengine for a new one for free..

post #53 of 67

So this might be shallow of me, but I love the look of the Audioengine 2 and 5. Are there any good speakers that have the sort of box look? Sorry for the very shallow question.

post #54 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by takubi View Post

So this might be shallow of me, but I love the look of the Audioengine 2 and 5. Are there any good speakers that have the sort of box look ? Sorry for the very shallow question.

 

What exactly do you mean? Most speakers have that "box look," and prices go up for good speakers that don't follow this form factor since 1) the enclosures need to be of precise measurement and 2) rigidity, and a complex shape that does both is generally harder to make.

 

Here are a few boxy speakers: 

 

 

 

Here are somewhat boxy speakers with some curved panels: 

 

 

 

Here are non-boxy speakers:

post #55 of 67

Ya, I like those. What are some good quality ones for a good price?

post #56 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by takubi View Post

Ya, I like those. What are some good quality ones for a good price?

 

Just to add to my previous post, while rectangular shapes are generally easier to measure for volume and to construct for rigidity, the shape can have disadvantages in managing soundwaves coming out the rear of the cone speaker and into the box. They can bounce off corners and the measurements of the sides can introduce distortion (which is why they avoid perfect cube boxes, since that will amplify the distortion within a narrow range).

 

On to your speaker options - the cheapest many people recommend are the Dayton B652 but they'll still need an amplifier (and a DAC if you're planning to use it with a computer and not its soundcard).

 

Personally for a computer I'd rather use an active monitor and either a DAC (which is an audiophile terminology for the equipment) or an interface (which is a pro-version, probably has an ADC as well as a DAC), which puts the volume control within reach (and possibly much better SQ than an ordinary soundcard integrated into a motherboard), plus these are nearfield monitors. All measured performance/specs are from the microphone at the same distance as you would if you were on a desk, instead of what hi-fi speaker manufacturers assume will be you sitting at least 1.5m or more from the midpoint between two speakers about 1m or more apart. They also come with dual amps in each monitor designed specifically for the tweeter and woofer. My long-running favorites for not a lot of money are the Samson Resolv R5a and KRK Rokit 5; not sure what others are out there though. Think of the Audioengine A5 as a speaker that incorporates the basic design template but designed for a home listening setting instead of a drab grey studio (thus the colors, the target market - music lovers and not pros, only mini-TRS and RCA, now with USB Port for charging, etc). The A2 would be more like Samson's MediaOne series.


Edited by ProtegeManiac - 9/4/12 at 2:16am
post #57 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

 

Just to add to my previous post, while rectangular shapes are generally easier to measure for volume and to construct for rigidity, the shape can have disadvantages in managing soundwaves coming out the rear of the cone speaker and into the box. They can bounce off corners and the measurements of the sides can introduce distortion (which is why they avoid perfect cube boxes, since that will amplify the distortion within a narrow range).

 

On to your speaker options - the cheapest many people recommend are the Dayton B652 but they'll still need an amplifier (and a DAC if you're planning to use it with a computer and not its soundcard).

 

Personally for a computer I'd rather use an active monitor and either a DAC (which is an audiophile terminology for the equipment) or an interface (which is a pro-version, probably has an ADC as well as a DAC), which puts the volume control within reach (and possibly much better SQ than an ordinary soundcard integrated into a motherboard), plus these are nearfield monitors. All measured performance/specs are from the microphone at the same distance as you would if you were on a desk, instead of what hi-fi speaker manufacturers assume will be you sitting at least 1.5m or more from the midpoint between two speakers about 1m or more apart. They also come with dual amps in each monitor designed specifically for the tweeter and woofer. My long-running favorites for not a lot of money are the Samson Resolv R5a and KRK Rokit 5; not sure what others are out there though. Think of the Audioengine A5 as a speaker that incorporates the basic design template but designed for a home listening setting instead of a drab grey studio (thus the colors, the target market - music lovers and not pros, only mini-TRS and RCA, now with USB Port for charging, etc). The A2 would be more like Samson's MediaOne series.

If I were to get the Daytons, what amp/DAC should I get (will be with my computer).

 

Also, if I interpreted your post correctly, I am looking for something designed for home listening.

post #58 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by takubi View Post

If I were to get the Daytons, what amp/DAC should I get (will be with my computer).

Lots of options out there, but mostly you can go cheap by getting a good t-amp and a reasonably good USB DAC. These for example:
Amp - http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-15W-TA2024-Tripath-Digital-Class-D-Amp-Case-12V-PSU-/350594801743?pt=US_Home_Audio_Amplifiers_Preamps&hash=item51a114204f
DAC - http://www.ebay.com/itm/MUSE-DA10-PCM2704-MINI-USB-DAC-Digital-Decoder-Headphone-Amplifier-Adaptor-/230835134355?pt=US_Home_Audio_Amplifiers_Preamps&hash=item35bed89f93

 

Or you can get both functions in the same device : http://www.ebay.com/itm/Topping-TP30-USB-DAC-TA2024-T-AMP-Digital-Headphone-Amplifier-/220951432072?pt=US_Pro_Audio_Amplifiers&hash=item3371bb4b88
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by takubi View Post
Also, if I interpreted your post correctly, I am looking for something designed for home listening.

 

Are you referring to the KRK and Samson monitors in my post? You can use those for home listening, which I assume will be nearfield - ie, you're using the computer while listening, not a dedicated multimedia-only PC as source - which is what those speakers are designed for. Setting aside what many people say about "audiophile" speakers being "colored," in this case a speaker designed with matching amps in them already and are designed with the listener just in front of them make them hard to ignore for such an application.

BTW I have at least two friends who use one each of those - one with a VXT5 and the other a Rubicon6 - for their bedroom audio set-ups with a computer/iPod source. They haven't "upgraded" yet, save maybe for the Samson guy who might get an interface or USB DAC just to put the volume control within easier reach.


Edited by ProtegeManiac - 9/10/12 at 8:19pm
post #59 of 67

So the Daytons paired with the Topping DAC/amp would be good for nearfield listening in my bedroom? Also are there any other options for my listening desires?

post #60 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by takubi View Post

So the Daytons paired with the Topping DAC/amp would be good for nearfield listening in my bedroom? Also are there any other options for my listening desires?

 

They're great price-wise; enough reviews claim that those T-amps (which for the most part are similar enough) are great with those speakers. Other options will depend on other factors, like budget and if you're willing to go for used, how long are you willing to wait?

I'm probably getting either the Fostex PM04.n or KRK Rokit 5 for the short term myself; if at any point I have enough cash to spare I'll upgrade to (hopefully) Focal monitors, mostly so that my car and my desk will sound alike.

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