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TTVJ Slim and Grado 325si --- Warm? - Page 2

post #16 of 31

I used to own the RSA Hornet and found it on the warm side. Still not warm enough to tame the SR-325is headphones that I had at the same time mind you.

post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacedonianHero View Post




That is an illusion that headphone manufacturers sometimes use...crank up the treble to give that impression. smile.gif But with that said, there's always room for a Grado in one's headphone collection.

 


THIS.  Grado's have their "tonal handicaps" and other warts, but are a truly ton of fun when one is in the mood and has the right tunes.  Pretty much an essential for those that like more than one flavor.

 

post #18 of 31

I don't find the TTVJ Slim particularly warm. I'd rather use the terms "analog", "full-bodied" and "romantic", but there definitely isn't any sense of treble roll-off.

post #19 of 31

Yeah I don't find it particularly warm either.  Maybe a little.  It's certainly not harsh, cold, or analytical in the slightest.  It's neutral with a touch of natural warmth in the midrange. 

post #20 of 31

A word of warning - I once posted something similar in my search for a tube amp to tame the Grado highs and enhance the glorious mids of my AD900 - Uncle Erik posted a very detailed explanation of why I was unlikely to get what I wanted for less than a thousand dollars in a tube amp. Basically, the topology/parts requiired to drive a 32-ohm headphone from a tube amp mean that the end product is going to cost considerably more than $300. Many here described the TTVJ Slim as having a 'tube-like' sound, but I take that with a grain of salt. As others have suggested, I think your best option is to change headphones. I dont buy phones from Sennheiser, but the HD558/598 seem to be getting a lot of kudos here - the 650 seems to polarise people.

post #21 of 31
Thread Starter 


Since the only real lesson I've learned here is that the journey never ends, I'm just going to try different stuff. I just put my Grados up on the For Sale boards. I'm going to go for the 650's. we'll see what happens. Thanks!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by estreeter View Post

A word of warning - I once posted something similar in my search for a tube amp to tame the Grado highs and enhance the glorious mids of my AD900 - Uncle Erik posted a very detailed explanation of why I was unlikely to get what I wanted for less than a thousand dollars in a tube amp. Basically, the topology/parts requiired to drive a 32-ohm headphone from a tube amp mean that the end product is going to cost considerably more than $300. Many here described the TTVJ Slim as having a 'tube-like' sound, but I take that with a grain of salt. As others have suggested, I think your best option is to change headphones. I dont buy phones from Sennheiser, but the HD558/598 seem to be getting a lot of kudos here - the 650 seems to polarise people.



 


Edited by FlatNine - 9/17/11 at 2:56pm
post #22 of 31

When discussing the tonal qualities of headphones, I am wondering why it is that people with a nice set of cans as the Grado 325si or such do not make use of at least the onboard equalizer of their sound card, to with the software equalizer of iTunes or whatever to boost their bottom end? Me I loved my Grado 325s right away , well after I went to the storage room and pulled up my mothballed audio system including a rotel equalizer. and refocussed the element of the sound to my preferences. 

Sincerely, if you go out for a set of quality cans, the performance is there if you just do a little tweaking. 

Or am I missing something in the standard to which head-fier's expect their equipment to perform at stock form. I mean to me the use of an equalizer is no more bastardization than turning up or down the volume knob.

Tell me if I am wrong. but I think if you can get the signal to be reproduced in the cans there is nothing wrong with lifting or lowering the spectrum of response.

 

My newest $0.02  

post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlatNine View Post


Since the only real lesson I've learned here is that the journey never ends, I'm just going to try different stuff. I just put my Grados up on the For Sale boards. I'm going to go for the 650's. we'll see what happens. Thanks!
 



 


Very commendable approach and it seems a bit rare these days. I would urge you to keep your latest purchase when buying the next thing so you have a reference to compare to and so you know your tastes arent the thing thats changed, something thats bound to happen. If you can afford to do this it will really help, even if you only own both for a couple weeks before selling the older headphone.
post #24 of 31
Thread Starter 


You make a good point, and I recently posted about the "allowing" EQ to be factored in to the bottom line when comparing gear. (I think it was a post on the Cowon X7 and the whole Jet BBE thing) I could certainly live with the Grado's - they are fine phones for sure. But I'll probably never be 100% content, at least for very long, and researching and trying new gear is definitely a large part of the fun in this hobby. The 325's were my first nice set of HP's, and they will always hold a special place in my heart. You never forget your first, right? I'm just dying to try out the Senns. After that, it may be time for a new DAP. Round and round she goes.....
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxtcc View Post

When discussing the tonal qualities of headphones, I am wondering why it is that people with a nice set of cans as the Grado 325si or such do not make use of at least the onboard equalizer of their sound card, to with the software equalizer of iTunes or whatever to boost their bottom end? Me I loved my Grado 325s right away , well after I went to the storage room and pulled up my mothballed audio system including a rotel equalizer. and refocussed the element of the sound to my preferences. 

Sincerely, if you go out for a set of quality cans, the performance is there if you just do a little tweaking. 

Or am I missing something in the standard to which head-fier's expect their equipment to perform at stock form. I mean to me the use of an equalizer is no more bastardization than turning up or down the volume knob.

Tell me if I am wrong. but I think if you can get the signal to be reproduced in the cans there is nothing wrong with lifting or lowering the spectrum of response.

 

My newest $0.02  



 

post #25 of 31
Thread Starter 

 

That is so true. My friend, a classical guitarist, took me with him to Cleveland, Ohio (we're from Connecticut) to help him purchase a high end classical guitar. (I'm a jazz player, but was able to at least help him make his own choice) We went this place called Guitars International. There's probably only about 10 places like this in the country, if that many. It is by appointment only, and you spend hours trying different guitars. Since the guitars range from about 7 thousand to about 30 thousand dollars, you can see why large inventory is not all that common. The point is this: ALL those guitars were extremely fine instruments, built by the best of the best luthiers. If you were to play any single one with no reference, you'd say it was fantastic, which they all are. But being able to switch back and forth really illustrated the differences in tonal characteristics, and helped him see just what appealed to him, and what did not. (He settled on a 25 thousand dollar Robert Ruck guitar that was simply amazing!)

 

I wish there was a place I could go for audio to do that. I'd imagine that switching DAPs, amps, and phones all in one place would be a blast, but you could really compare and see what you like and don't like.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhythmdevils View Post

Very commendable approach and it seems a bit rare these days. I would urge you to keep your latest purchase when buying the next thing so you have a reference to compare to and so you know your tastes arent the thing thats changed, something thats bound to happen. If you can afford to do this it will really help, even if you only own both for a couple weeks before selling the older headphone.



 

 


Edited by FlatNine - 9/18/11 at 5:38am
post #26 of 31

I sure would like to have a chance some day to check out a guitar assortment such as you portrayed about that store in Cleveland.

I am not at that range of musical skill with a guitar, much as I love to play, but I can feel what you mean, as I have a modest collection from which to choose as the mood may fit me through the days, often one or another will call out to be played in a certain manner to which it is all in its own world of sound. Indeed, on that note about guitars and instruments in general, it is the comparison that will bring out the nuances of character and change which will touch one person's soul in a different way than it would to another.  With guitars, for myself it definitely takes one guitar to be sensational with a certain "sound"  than another, an acoustic which is righteous with some blues, may have too much bottom end on a jazz breakout, etc.  

I would make the case that after all, Headphones are much like a fine instrument as well, which is why I was trying to understand in what manner some of us take EQ into account with them. Sound in the cans can well benefit from a light touch on the EQ I think.

 

 

post #27 of 31
Thread Starter 

The place I'm talking about is not a retail store where people come in and browse and play guitars. When we got there, which was by appointment only, he had set aside about 8 hours for my friend and I to compare instruments. He even checked out our clothes to make sure we didn't have anything that could damage these instruments - things like zippers, etc. He only had classical guitars, which is a whole other world. Yes, some retail detailers may have a few guitars that are under 2 thousand dollars, but not many, and they usually cost more like $500. The market is just not big enough. All concert quality classicals are individually handmade.

 

Here's an interesting story that can also be applied to audio gear, told to us by Armin Kelly, the owner of the place I am talking about. There was some art and culture show in or near Cleveland where Armin does business. Two world class classical guitarists were going to be playing and both wanted Armin to bring a couple of instruments to the hotel fo them to try. One player just hated this one particular guitar, while the other loved it so much he bought it. We're all so different. And these were world class players, both whose aural discernment was highly developed. You should check out the web site - he pays a professional photographer to take the most amazing pictures of these guitars. It is like classical guitar ****. The site is http://www.guitarsint.com. (It seems to be down at the moment though, maybe for maintenance.)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxtcc View Post

I sure would like to have a chance some day to check out a guitar assortment such as you portrayed about that store in Cleveland.

I am not at that range of musical skill with a guitar, much as I love to play, but I can feel what you mean, as I have a modest collection from which to choose as the mood may fit me through the days, often one or another will call out to be played in a certain manner to which it is all in its own world of sound. Indeed, on that note about guitars and instruments in general, it is the comparison that will bring out the nuances of character and change which will touch one person's soul in a different way than it would to another.  With guitars, for myself it definitely takes one guitar to be sensational with a certain "sound"  than another, an acoustic which is righteous with some blues, may have too much bottom end on a jazz breakout, etc.  

I would make the case that after all, Headphones are much like a fine instrument as well, which is why I was trying to understand in what manner some of us take EQ into account with them. Sound in the cans can well benefit from a light touch on the EQ I think.

 

 



 


Edited by FlatNine - 9/18/11 at 5:56am
post #28 of 31

I've got nothing but praise for my Slim, it simply drives my HD650's wonderfully as a desktop Corda HA-2 MKII, it also made me like my UM2's more than I did before.

 

I'd say more than anything it's pretty neutral and gives a natural reproduction of whatever you throw at it. That is to my ears of course.

post #29 of 31
Thread Starter 


Glad to hear that, since that combo is where I'm headed. I should be ordering the 650's in a day or so, and of course, I already have the Slim. Thanks ((2^16)-1).  bigsmile_face.gif
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 65535 View Post

I've got nothing but praise for my Slim, it simply drives my HD650's wonderfully as a desktop Corda HA-2 MKII, it also made me like my UM2's more than I did before.

 

I'd say more than anything it's pretty neutral and gives a natural reproduction of whatever you throw at it. That is to my ears of course.



 

post #30 of 31

My 2 cents worth re EQ - its great to sprinkle a little cinnamon on a vanilla milkshake : its still a vanilla milkshake. The fun starts when I start adding cocoa because I'm not happy with the taste of vanilla ....

 

I'm buying the ZO V2 in the hope that I will be able enhance a stack of vanilla recordings, not turn them into chocolate mousse. For an example of the latter, try some of the iTunes preset EQ ..........

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