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Why don't more headphones have replaceable cables? - Page 4

post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavedave View Post

The truth is I have recabled many headphones and can say from first hand experience that it the best way to do things and sounds best in my opinion.
There is a most definite difference as to wether you think it is better is a personal opinion. I guess unless you have tried it you wouldn't know. So many times wisdom would reserve a thought until they prove it by actually finding the truth by hearing it for them selves instead of just thinking it couldn't possibly be true because I don't think it makes sense.
I think alot of the new headphones have removable cables because people like something to fuss with. And others like making money off others mis conceptions. We have made things far more complicated then they need to be. Just some thoughts from someone old enough to have seen and made some mistakes of my own and see others doing the same.
There's a lot of placebo in audio though, not that I don't trust you... it's just sometimes you can't even trust your own hearing let alone that of others.
post #47 of 50

Ideally every part of a high-end pair should be easily user-replaceable. The fact that the Fidelios X1 don't have user-replaceable earpads kept me from buying one and the cable in the Beyers is why I'll keep avoiding them unless I find some killer deal.

 

I'm more than willing to sacrifice a small bit of sound quality for convenience.

post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by buemba View Post

Ideally every part of a high-end pair should be easily user-replaceable. The fact that the Fidelios X1 don't have user-replaceable earpads kept me from buying one and the cable in the Beyers is why I'll keep avoiding them unless I find some killer deal.

I'm more than willing to sacrifice a small bit of sound quality for convenience.
This is how I feel too. I would rather not have to open the headphones and solder hair-thin wire if the cable breaks.
post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddTheMetalGod View Post


Conducting is conducting. A gold plate in direct contact with a wire is going to transfer electrons just as well as a solid wire. It won't affect the signal or power transfer, if it did no companies would even have the option to use one. By that logic the power cable for your amplifier is degrading sound quality.

Edit: Obviously there are situations where directly soldering is better, but headphones aren't a sensitive application. Like industrial situations. The transfer isn't going to be bad enough to affect the amount of power or signal it is transferring. This isn't a nuclear reactor, it's a basic audio device tongue.gif.

We should probably just agree to disagree, since neither of us have measurements as proof. I get where you're coming from with hard wiring though.

 

Who is talking about gold? And saying conducting is conducting is like saying water flowing is water flowing. Or driving a car is driving a car. There are multiple ways to drive, flow or conduct and countless variables that can affect those processes.

 

I agree that you probably can't notice the difference (note how I added probably). That doesn't change the fact that it's worse, though.

 

The power cable isn't transporting an analog signal subject to degradation.

 

Gold plating is just for corrosion resistance, btw. It has no advantage over other cheaper metals in electrical conductivity. Why almost every headphone maker uses gold plating these days? Marketing. 

post #50 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aizura View Post

Who is talking about gold? And saying conducting is conducting is like saying water flowing is water flowing. Or driving a car is driving a car. There are multiple ways to drive, flow or conduct and countless variables that can affect those processes.

I agree that you probably can't notice the difference (note how I added probably). That doesn't change the fact that it's worse, though.

The power cable isn't transporting an analog signal subject to degradation.

Gold plating is just for corrosion resistance, btw. It has no advantage over other cheaper metals in electrical conductivity. Why almost every headphone maker uses gold plating these days? Marketing. 
I keep forgetting that about gold, I'm just so used to seeing it everywhere that I forget that it's for durability and not sound. But gold does conduct better, it just doesn't make an audible difference... likely the same as removable cables. Honestly, magnetic shielding or power conditioning would probably make more of a difference than hard wiring in terms of signal transfer. But does it really matter, what we're discussing is almost certainly beyond everyone's threshold of hearing.
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