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Meet 'Typical Headfier' Andy - Page 148

post #2206 of 2311
Makes sense. I am a graphic designer, which explains my comment about the typography and my love/hate relationship with meme generator stuff (love the humor, the typography often makes me cringe)
post #2207 of 2311

I'm an amateur web designer. Typography and layout (especially the latter) leave a lot to be desired in many places of the Internet. That demon inside me that just goes apeschiit about that sort of stuff gets tweaked every time I see, for instance, blinding white serifed font on a black background, or Comic Sans anything, or text that just wraps when it hits the edge of the screen, without padding or margins or even a semblance of layout. Oh, and centered. Can't forget that.

post #2208 of 2311
33785470.jpg

Referring to the typography, of course.
Maybe I should've said "reads great," but then...
Edited by Evshrug - 1/23/13 at 10:27pm
post #2209 of 2311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evshrug View Post

33785470.jpg

Referring to the typography, of course.
Maybe I should've said "reads great," but then...

 

I'm also a bit of a grammar nazi. Yeah, that "your" above...must...restrain...urge...to...grr...

 

Or was that intentional? wink.gif

post #2210 of 2311
Totally intentional, HAD to do that and leave "this" as a widow. Although, "this" being by itself accidentally gives it more power and almost seems to work. It amuses me that some day, someone will take it out of context and assume I went for the cheap shot, but no, I HAD to do it with memegenerator, and I had to take the über-geeky passage down the rabbit hole. I would've made the font "comic sans" if I could, totally inspired by your post.

If only I could've put "this" on his nose.
Edited by Evshrug - 1/23/13 at 10:45pm
post #2211 of 2311

post #2212 of 2311
post #2213 of 2311
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimLaroux View Post

 

oh no....oh no......no..no no no.

post #2214 of 2311

I just had to share this.... I didn't make it so credit to the person that did:

 

*

post #2215 of 2311
^ I have a friend, who I've known since 3rd Grade, who graduated with a BA degree in musical education about two years ago, who last time I saw him was swearing by the pair of beats he recently got as the best headphones ever. Sadly, I think he is more interested in working on music than enjoying music frown.gif

Last I'd heard of him, in the summer, he had stopped subbing music Ed courses and had become some sort of an assistant for a Republican politician. I say all that not because I think he's bad or dumb, in fact I admire his work ethic and I think he will do well career-wise, but personally I would be so unsatisfied with my life.
post #2216 of 2311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evshrug View Post

^ I have a friend, who I've known since 3rd Grade, who graduated with a BA degree in musical education about two years ago, who last time I saw him was swearing by the pair of beats he recently got as the best headphones ever. Sadly, I think he is more interested in working on music than enjoying music frown.gif
 

 

It's paradoxical, but the two things don't always (or often, in my experience) go together. Musical talent and experience have nothing to do with hearing acuity (i.e. Beethoven wrote some of his best music while deaf) or a sense for good sound. You need only look at the loudness wars to see this. If all musicians could judge good audio quality, they'd be appalled at what engineers and labels are doing to their music, and the more technically-minded could in fact learn how to record and mix and thus engineer their own tracks. Almost nobody does this. Most of them just sing, play, and/or write and aren't concerned about the rest of the process.

 

The ability to judge audio quality is a separate thing entirely. I'd love to see some research on the subject, but my feeling is that it has to do with the brain organizing auditory input differently (e.g. more precisely/fine grained, greater attention to detail) than most people, as well as the ability to store a prototype for natural tonal and attack/decay properties. Humans do this in other places (e.g. you know very precisely what a human should look like, and anyone who deviates significantly from that prototype produces a negative reaction). It makes sense that audiophiles' brains could just use these same cognitive abilities for audio.

post #2217 of 2311

 

Have fun, Andy nerds.

post #2218 of 2311

Oh hallo Andy's dad

post #2219 of 2311

 

 


Edited by anetode - 1/29/13 at 6:46pm
post #2220 of 2311

Typical Headfier - floats? nah. modded my t50rp.

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