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Do you really care about the "Studio" or "Professional" words on Headphones? - Page 2

post #16 of 32

I never said that a video editor would be the same kind of authority on sound as a real sound engineer or producer. The issue at hand was: are cans used in professional studios? The answer is: yes, they are a very crucial part of film/video production. I also never said cans should be used as the sole source of reference, I meant that they are a reference amongst other references and certainly an important reference considering how many people use cans to listen to music. Either way, I do believe we actually agree on most accounts, so I'm not looking for an argument here, Just trying to clear things up.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gregorio View Post



With all due respect, yes a number of video editors use cans for sound (and poor speakers in poor acoustics), that is one of the main reasons why they produce lower quality audio results than an experienced dubbing engineer in a well designed and calibrated mix room, where all mixing and dubbing is done through speakers. BTW, cans should never be used for referencing unless you are creating a product primarily designed to be listened to with cans.

To the OP: Bare in mind that a studio today is not quite what it once was. These days, anyone with a sound card, a mic and a computer in their bedroom can call themselves a "studio" and if they've charged their mates for editing and burning a CD they can also call themselves "professional". So using the title of "Studio" or "Professional" does not necessarily mean very much, beyond marketing. Jupitreas is correct that cans are used for several purposes in professional use. Recording studios always had a few pairs of Beyer DT100s around. DT100s had truly dreadful bass response, which made them ideal for providing a musician with a cue mix during recording, as there was very little bass to spill back into the microphones. Apart from a few specialist applications like this, you are right when you say that headphones are not used much in studios.

G


 

post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by jupitreas View Post

I never said that a video editor would be the same kind of authority on sound as a real sound engineer or producer. The issue at hand was: are cans used in professional studios? The answer is: yes, they are a very crucial part of film/video production.


My point was, that it's kind of irrelevant. A video editing suite is no more relevant to a "Professional Studio" (as far as audio is concerned) than say a hair studio. The only crucial part of TV/film sound requiring headphone use is during production (filming), not in picture editing or any other part of post-production. In fact, cans should never be used in post-production for anything other than a product which is primarily aimed at cans use.

Apart from this point though, I agree with you that on all the other points we are in agreement.

G
post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregorio View Post



In fact, cans should never be used in post-production for anything other than a product which is primarily aimed at cans use.
 

Please do not start with this BS...hps are great for recording vocal, and monitoring micro details of your mix and your mastering work, and those micro details you're not going to get in a bedroom studio. I think any musician, or sound/mastering engineer needs hps as a second reference system, especially those days that the music is mostly in a digital high resolution format and most of the music customers listing to mp3's from a little devices on the road or in bed.

 

The audiophile clients will have the best sounds systems on the market, and this includes a few $K hps system. Either way I think the hps will improve your work of whatever you're doing in the music business.

 

Read the, my new album Rabbit Dream thread, and see the important of using hps in music.

 

 

BTW, the post-production dudes should be the first ones to use hps, this way they can burn their brain out with the L2 before they'll burn my TV speakers with their loud/clipping, and scary sounds advertise.


Edited by Acix - 9/10/11 at 8:29am
post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acix View Post

Please do not start with this BS...hps are great for recording vocal, and monitoring micro details of your mix and your mastering work, and those micro details you're not going to get in a bedroom studio. I think any musician, or sound/mastering engineer needs hps as a second reference system, especially those days that the music is mostly in a digital high resolution format and most of the music customers listing to mp3's from a little devices on the road or in bed.

 

The audiophile clients will have the best sounds systems on the market, and this includes a few $K hps system. Either way I think the hps will improve your work of whatever you're doing in the music business.

 

Read the, my new album Rabbit Dream thread, and see the important of using hps in music.

 

 

BTW, the post-production dudes should be the first ones to use hps, this way they can burn their brain out with the L2 before they'll burn my TV speakers with their loud/clipping, and scary sounds advertise.


I'm starting to dread when you reply to one of my posts. Off you go with insults, when you have no idea what I'm talking about and even no idea what you are talking about. There is no mastering in audio post! The monitoring of mixes in audio post has to be done in a calibrated room, with calibrated speakers, you cannot use cans. It is impossible to meet broadcast or film sound specifications using cans! What on earth has your bedroom studio got to do with a professional dubbing theatre? TV is not high resolution digital format, the specifications usually call for 16/48.

You don't actually know anything about audio post do you? If you did, you would know that there cannot be any clipping in the deliverables.

So you came on this thread just to insult, demonstrate your ignorance and peddle your student level CD. Way to go!

G
post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregorio View Post



I'm starting to dread when you reply to one of my posts. Off you go with insults, when you have no idea what I'm talking about and even no idea what you are talking about. There is no mastering in audio post! The monitoring of mixes in audio post has to be done in a calibrated room, with calibrated speakers, you cannot use cans. It is impossible to meet broadcast or film sound specifications using cans! What on earth has your bedroom studio got to do with a professional dubbing theatre? TV is not high resolution digital format, the specifications usually call for 16/48.

You don't actually know anything about audio post do you? If you did, you would know that there cannot be any clipping in the deliverables.

So you came on this thread just to insult, demonstrate your ignorance and peddle your student level CD. Way to go!

G



 lol, this thread is about studio hps, and is not about hps in the post-production, but you can steer the conversation as you wish...BTW, I glad you like my music. 


Edited by Acix - 9/10/11 at 10:44am
post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acix View Post

 lol, this thread is about studio hps, and is not about hps in the post-production, but you can steer the conversation as you wish...BTW, I glad you like my music.

If this thread is about studio hps then you should have replied to the thread, instead you thought by insulting me, spouting a load of ignorant BS and peddling your CD that you'd somehow appear intelligent. Bit of a miscalculation there I think!

G

BTW: Yep, a fairly average second year student level work. I could give you a detailed professional opinion but I don't want to embarrass you (when you seem to be doing such a good job all on your own) and my professional advice is ... well professional (IE. Not free)!
post #22 of 32

 

I like the way the V6's say "STUDIO MONITOR" and the font they used.

post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregorio View Post



If this thread is about studio hps then you should have replied to the thread, instead you thought by insulting me, spouting a load of ignorant BS and peddling your CD that you'd somehow appear intelligent. Bit of a miscalculation there I think!

G

BTW: Yep, a fairly average second year student level work. I could give you a detailed professional opinion but I don't want to embarrass you (when you seem to be doing such a good job all on your own) and my professional advice is ... well professional (IE. Not free)!



lol, I think you think to much... If you have something positive to offer, like music for example I'll be glad to hear it.

post #24 of 32

Nope, to me it's all about the sound.

post #25 of 32

It sort of bothers me that my hd650's are labeled as "reference" when they would be one of the last headphone's I'd go to for reference lol


Edited by colmustard - 9/10/11 at 2:16pm
post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by colmustard View Post

It sort of bothers me that my hdt650's are labeled as "reference" when they would be one of the last headphone's I'd go to for reference lol


Haha, still better than the beat's pros. "reference headphones for audio professionals"

 

post #27 of 32

I only use headphones that say "Digital Ready" on the package because I have a digital setup and want to get the best sound possible. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by colmustard View Post

It sort of bothers me that my hdt650's are labeled as "reference" when they would be one of the last headphone's I'd go to for reference lol


 

And Ultrasones are a good reference?  Or K701 for that matter?  wink.gif

post #28 of 32

Oh god no, ultrasone's are even more colored than my hd650s, which is why I love them so much!

 

The k701 makes a good reference in my opinion if the exaggerated soundstage doesn't bother you.

post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by colmustard View Post

Oh god no, ultrasone's are even more colored than my hd650s, which is why I love them so much!

 

The k701 makes a good reference in my opinion if the exaggerated soundstage doesn't bother you.



Yes, the K-702 are a great reference hps and they fit well with my Adams monitors. About the sound stage and the depth that help a lot to get the 3 dimensional aspect of a song and specific location of instruments.  

post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhythmdevils View Post

I only use headphones that say "Digital Ready" on the package because I have a digital setup and want to get the best sound possible


i see what you did.
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