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Some OVERRATED High End Gear. - Page 14

post #196 of 330

I did not see the transparent comment, I thought ASR had blown a fuse... 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chesebert View Post

Nearly crapped in my pants.

Good one!

 

post #197 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnaud View Post

Will you build me a DIY T2 then ? wink.gif




If you give me the circuit and pay me for the parts and labor, sure.
post #198 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by InnerSpace View Post

I think the demise of DIY is more of a general cultural change, brought on by the disappearance of manufacturing industry.  Back in the day the average joe either worked a manufacturing job or had brothers or neighbors who did, and making something himself was a default instinct.  My grandfathers were typical.  They made everything themselves - toys for the kids, windows for the house, all of it - because they were totally comfortable with the process.  All day long they saw steel go in one end of the factory and finished goods come out the other.  People don't see that anymore, so the default instinct is fading away.


This ^.  I think it's largely cultural and economic.  More people today have to work longer hours for less money to support families.  Less time for personal growth and time consuming hobbies.  Today's society is all off the shelf.  People don't even cook anymore and even if they do it's hardly real cooking but tossing packages in boiling water or microwaves.  I really don't think it's all about aesthetics and psychology.  People that fall for that have never been and will never be DIY'ers.  They tend to be the newly rich, yuppy status seekers.  Granted I still want an Aston Martin as DIYing one would mean I'd be dead of old age before I finish.  So there is an argument to be made for premium products as long as they are exactly that.

 

post #199 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaxilus View Post




This ^.  I think it's largely cultural and economic.  More people today have to work longer hours for less money to support families.  Less time for personal growth and time consuming hobbies.  Today's society is all off the shelf.  People don't even cook anymore and even if they do it's hardly real cooking but tossing packages in boiling water or microwaves.  I really don't think it's all about aesthetics and psychology.  People that fall for that have never been and will never be DIY'ers.  They tend to be the newly rich, yuppy status seekers.  Granted I still want an Aston Martin as DIYing one would mean I'd be dead of old age before I finish.  So there is an argument to be made for premium products as long as they are exactly that.

 


Buy a Caterham if you want to build your own car. It's certainly possible to do so. Granted building a car on the level of an Aston Martin is a bit harder.

 

post #200 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveBSC View Post


Buy a Caterham if you want to build your own car. It's certainly possible to do so. Granted building a car on the level of an Aston Martin is a bit harder.

 


Oh that's easy.  Plus there's the Ariel Atom.  I was looking at an Austin Healey and there's always the Shelby too.  Kit cars are fun.  I was just using the Aston as a specific example for contrast.  We're talking about companies that have had 3+ generations of the same family just doing the coachwork alone.  Even if I could master that in one lifetime all I'd have is a set of seats sitting in the garage.

 

post #201 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaxilus View Post

Oh that's easy.  Plus there's the Ariel Atom.  I was looking at an Austin Healey and there's always the Shelby too.  Kit cars are fun.  I was just using the Aston as a specific example for contrast.  We're talking about companies that have had 3+ generations of the same family just doing the coachwork alone.  Even if I could master that in one lifetime all I'd have is a set of seats sitting in the garage.

 


Getting back to audio, I don't think I agree with the idea that DIY is dead. Take the Stax community. Since Stax gave up the ultra high-end market after the end of the SRM-T2, there's been some cynically overpriced garbage from manufacturers, and outstanding DIY amps (KGST, KGSS, BH, KGSSHV, DIYT2, and a few other non Gilmore designs). Considering how small the high-end Stax niche is, that's an impressive roster, and thankfully because of them we don't have to put up with junk Singlepowers and McAlisters.

 

post #202 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asr View Post

(Actually, just kidding with the above, hah!) :p
 


If audiophiles chose gear with their ears only, that would be just as misguided. Do you have any idea how easy it would be for a vendor to make a shoddy piece of gear that still sounds good to at least one person? Audiophiles need to choose gear with their eyes, ears, and brains. Don't buy blindly based on either aesthetics or sound, or both - it should be what's inside that counts.


Well, that is why I said audio enthusiasts instead of the culturally loaded "audiophiles." I was assuming an ounce of intelligence and sense on their part, my bad. Perhaps I am unusual. but I do not give a virtual rat's ass what the outside looks like. I look inside electronics to inspect the quality of components, soldering and other assembly. And yes, my local dealer lets me do that. I also look over their shoulder when they have any unit open for repair. I lift speakers up to see how heavy they are; I have been known to put a mirror into the port, and tap around the outside to check for internal integrity.  I am also allergic to thinking of speakers as furniture. My DIY Hammer Dynamics have no finish on them; I may get around to it eventually. I will probably enlarge the port a little and might as well wait anyway.

 

WAF? My late wife let me have my speakers and I let her have her expensive furniture. Everything was fine. Besides, JBL 4345s look like expensive furniture anyway. Walnut furniture with deep blue fabric, that is.

 


Edited by Clarkmc2 - 9/14/11 at 1:03pm
post #203 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveBSC View Post


Oh it's definitely not dead.  Just less prevalent and I think the trend will continue downwards.  There's always going to be folks that like learning, understanding and getting things done w/ their own hands.  

 

post #204 of 330
I blame the demise of DIY more on corporations and the culture.

Planned obsolescence is everywhere. You're "expected" to upgrade every few years and toss old products. It used to be that things were built to be repairable. Now repairs are seen as a profit center and a way to encourage people to just buy a new one.

People used to fix things. Growing up (I'm 39), every adult I knew had a workbench. No one seems to have one today.

Culturally, people are such wusses. Instead of even trying, people throw their hands up and declare that they're "not good" at something without making the slightest effort. Infuriating. The "can do" attitude and having a little confidence in figuring things out is gone. Instead, people freak out over the slightest blemish on their gear and treat the innards as some Great Mystery.

To go slightly off-topic, Clark, love those Hammer Dynamics! I've come close to impulsively buying those drivers a few times. But I have six pairs of speakers and have to hold back. As to weight and tapping on the cabs, that takes me back to building the ProAc Response 2.5 clones. I spent a lot of time lining them with Dynamat and lineoleum tiles. The cabs are awfully dead and damned heavy. And completely worth it. smily_headphones1.gif Got the crossovers mirrored and matched to about .005, too. You can't get that with commercial designs.
post #205 of 330

The funny thing is there really is no better time for DIY than now thanks to the internet. There is so much information, guides and tutorials available out there that you could become an expert at nearly anything if you want to, and the prevalence of forums dedicated to various hobbies means that advice and collaboration are only a couple mouse clicks away.

post #206 of 330

I just tried the UM Merlin, imo the downright worst custom I have heard. The mnids and highs are great (very similar to the Miracle) but the mid to bass transition is imo horrendously disjointed. It sounds not well intergrated to me.

post #207 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by dyl1dyl View Post

I just tried the UM Merlin, imo the downright worst custom I have heard. The mnids and highs are great (very similar to the Miracle) but the mid to bass transition is imo horrendously disjointed. It sounds not well intergrated to me.

 

Custom or demo?  Your description sounds like the demos they are retuning.  We had to pause the loaner program because the demos were so far off the custom signature.
 

 

post #208 of 330
I completely agree with you on all counts. BUT...in the people's defense...most of the time it really is cheaper not to bother learning how to repair something.

The "average Joe" has an $800 TV, a $400 HT-in-a-box, a $600 laptop, and a free cell phone. Why should he spend another $1800 on an oscilloscope, signal generator, variable power supply, multimeter, etc, when he can get them all repaired or replaced elsewhere for less?

Oh, and if you want a fun fact: most people can actually do everything they need to do on their computer - web browsing, emails, music, and so on - with a Pentium II with 128MB of RAM - and still have it feel fast.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

I blame the demise of DIY more on corporations and the culture.

Planned obsolescence is everywhere. You're "expected" to upgrade every few years and toss old products. It used to be that things were built to be repairable. Now repairs are seen as a profit center and a way to encourage people to just buy a new one.

People used to fix things. Growing up (I'm 39), every adult I knew had a workbench. No one seems to have one today.

Culturally, people are such wusses. Instead of even trying, people throw their hands up and declare that they're "not good" at something without making the slightest effort. Infuriating. The "can do" attitude and having a little confidence in figuring things out is gone. Instead, people freak out over the slightest blemish on their gear and treat the innards as some Great Mystery.

To go slightly off-topic, Clark, love those Hammer Dynamics! I've come close to impulsively buying those drivers a few times. But I have six pairs of speakers and have to hold back. As to weight and tapping on the cabs, that takes me back to building the ProAc Response 2.5 clones. I spent a lot of time lining them with Dynamat and lineoleum tiles. The cabs are awfully dead and damned heavy. And completely worth it. smily_headphones1.gif Got the crossovers mirrored and matched to about .005, too. You can't get that with commercial designs.

Edited by Manyak - 9/15/11 at 3:02pm
post #209 of 330

I think there's also some confusion between people's will to do something and inner complexity of nowadays devices. For instance, repairing an iPhone, I mean, even just disassembly the thing without breaking it (ifixit.com) is a feat in itself! Let alone thinking about "repairing" some component on a board. Fixing a car: yes sure 70's design could be worked on in a home garage, nowadays injection systems and many other functions are regulated by electronics and there's little you can do with a couple of wrenches...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manyak View Post

I completely agree with you on all counts. BUT...in the people's defense...most of the time it really is cheaper not to bother learning how to repair something.

The "average Joe" has an $800 TV, a $400 HT-in-a-box, a $600 laptop, and a free cell phone. Why should he spend another $1800 on an oscilloscope, signal generator, variable power supply, multimeter, etc, when he can get them all repaired or replaced elsewhere for less?

Oh, and if you want a fun fact: most people can actually do everything they need to do on their computer - web browsing, emails, music, and so on - with a Pentium II with 128MB of RAM - and still have it feel fast.
 


 

post #210 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

I blame the demise of DIY more on corporations and the culture.

Planned obsolescence is everywhere. You're "expected" to upgrade every few years and toss old products. It used to be that things were built to be repairable. Now repairs are seen as a profit center and a way to encourage people to just buy a new one.

 

^^^x100.  i also find that pushing extended warranties at extra cost in lieu of offering a quality product in the first place to be insulting. 

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