Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Help a noob out.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Help a noob out.

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Sorry if this is in the wrong section, I'm new here.

 

Does converting files(such as mp3) using the realplayer converter to WAV make it a WAV file? I've heard some people say you can't convert from lossy to lossless, though.

Same for ripping using Windows Media Player-can't I just burn the mp3 files to a disc, and than rip it as a WAV file?

 

Thanks.

post #2 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnlinePredator View Post

Sorry if this is in the wrong section, I'm new here.

 

Does converting files(such as mp3) using the realplayer converter to WAV make it a WAV file? I've heard some people say you can't convert from lossy to lossless, though.

Same for ripping using Windows Media Player-can't I just burn the mp3 files to a disc, and than rip it as a WAV file?

 

Thanks.


Try reading these links - there's an amazing amount of queries on here asking the same thing:

http://www.head-fi.org/t/568293/any-programs-to-convert-mp3-to-wma-lossless

http://www.head-fi.org/t/431221/does-converting-to-apple-lossless-from-mp3-do-anything

http://www.head-fi.org/t/125424/mp3-file-converting

 

I could have listed quite a few others - but you'll get the gist from those wink.gif

 

There is no point converting lossy back to lossless.  All you add is size - you don't get any added quality.  If there is anything you don't understand from the links - ask away.

post #3 of 11

Shorter answer, it will not improve the sound quality of your music at all, DON'T DO IT.

post #4 of 11

Try it just for kicks. If you think the wav/flac sounds better, then that's your brain telling you it is better. Good for you.

If you don't hear a difference, switch back. 

 

 

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooko View Post




Try reading these links - there's an amazing amount of queries on here asking the same thing:

http://www.head-fi.org/t/568293/any-programs-to-convert-mp3-to-wma-lossless

http://www.head-fi.org/t/431221/does-converting-to-apple-lossless-from-mp3-do-anything

http://www.head-fi.org/t/125424/mp3-file-converting

 

I could have listed quite a few others - but you'll get the gist from those wink.gif

 

There is no point converting lossy back to lossless.  All you add is size - you don't get any added quality.  If there is anything you don't understand from the links - ask away.


Okay, so I can't convert lossy to lossless, or from a lesser bit-rate to 320 kbps.

 

What about burning mp3's to a disc, than ripping it as lossless?

Is the difference between 320 kbps mp3 and lossless noticeable and worth it?

What's the difference between variable and constant bit-rate, which is better, and how do I tell which a file is?

post #6 of 11

Unless you have really good gear, 320kbps should sound the same as lossless. Discs are not an item of magic, putting lossy music on there doesn't add info to it. Think of music data as salt and the file type as a container. No matter what container you put them in, the amount of salt will no change. Unless you put them in a smaller container, then some of the salt will be lost forever. 

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
okay, bump
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

...

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnlinePredator View Post

 

What about burning mp3's to a disc, than ripping it as lossless? Same as converting MP3 to lossless - in other words, pointless.

Is the difference between 320 kbps mp3 and lossless noticeable and worth it? Depends on whether your gear is revealing enough. I can't hear the difference out of a regular DAP, but I can through my home amp/DAC setup.

What's the difference between variable and constant bit-rate, which is better, and how do I tell which a file is? Variable bit rate means the bit rate will change throughout a song, with higher bitrates for complex sections and lower bitrates for simpler sections. Constant bit rate just keeps a consistent bit rate, regardless of the complexity of the audio. You can tell which is which by viewing the 'properties' of the file (at least on Windows). Some media players, like Foobar2000, also display whether a file uses VBR or not.


 

 

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345142 View Post




 

 



 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345142 View Post




 

 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345142 View Post




 

 



But aren't files on a CD mp3 files?

So which is better, variable or constant?

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnlinePredator View Post


But aren't files on a CD mp3 files?

So which is better, variable or constant?


Nope.  Typical modern CD has wav (lossless) files in the root directory, then subdirectories containing .cda, .flac, .mp3, and .ogg + often a directory with full whole CD continuous files in each of the aformentioned formats.

 

When you're playing the CD - you're playing the uncompressed lossless files in the root directory.

 

When you burn a  CD from MP3 files, they don't magically regain the info they've already lost from their original lossy conversion.  Once the info is gone, it's gone.

 

Best is to rip lossless (for PC listening or for archiving), and convert to lossy if space needed on your portable.

 

I rip everything to FLAC, then convert to 256aac for my ipod.  I've tried blind ab testing using foobar, and I can't reliably tell the difference between 256aac (which I believe is roughly equivalent to 320mp3 quality-wise) and flac - so this gives me best mix of quality and space for portable listening.

 

As far as variable and constant bitrate goes, variable will give you better size - just make sure you transcode with reasonably good quality (V0-V2) should be fine.

 

Hope this helps.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Music
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Help a noob out.