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What specifically makes grado good/better than everything else for metal - Page 2

post #16 of 21

X2
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by eggontoast View Post

There not, it is just some people's opinion and opinions vary. I personally can't stand listening to Metal or Rock through them.



 

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_Himself View Post

I think he means that the cans have a lot of "attack" where things decay very quickly so that music notes don't "blur" together so everything can be represented as accurately as can be. Some headphones are not good at fast music for example.

Yep. This is basically what I meant. If we're talking about the way that the mechanics of transient response has an effect on what you hear, I think that the promptness of attack and brevity of decay in the grado drivers is ideal for a lot of fast music.

It's hard to get a good answer on head-fi about grados because they're pretty divisive. There is a fan-boy camp and a hater camp. I'd also like to reiterate that my feedback was based on my heavily modded sr60i and that I haven't heard a stock one in at least a year. So YMMV greatly.

post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by wind016 View Post

I disagree. Grado drivers are slow and congested. It only appears to be quick because the treble+upper mids emphasis and complete lack of sub-bass makes it seem less congested than it actually is.

 

I'm also of the opinion that Grados are terrible for metal.

Would you mind elaborating a bit on your point?

 

How does a headphone "seem" any more or less anything than it "actually" is? If a lack of sub-bass makes a given driver "seem" like it's not congested, then wouldn't it just be a fast driver lacking sub-bass rather than an "actually" congested driver that is in some way disguising itself?

What gets me hung up with your point is what process is taking place when our perception and reality become so disjunct. If a headphone "seems" good at something then isn't it? What then is the touchstone of quality if you can't trust your ears? For example, If ,my grados sound fast and uncongested to me, what then is "actual" and how can I be made to perceive it?

 

Hoping you can clarify things here,

post #19 of 21

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by acticulated View Post

Would you mind elaborating a bit on your point?

 

How does a headphone "seem" any more or less anything than it "actually" is? If a lack of sub-bass makes a given driver "seem" like it's not congested, then wouldn't it just be a fast driver lacking sub-bass rather than an "actually" congested driver that is in some way disguising itself?

What gets me hung up with your point is what process is taking place when our perception and reality become so disjunct. If a headphone "seems" good at something then isn't it? What then is the touchstone of quality if you can't trust your ears? For example, If ,my grados sound fast and uncongested to me, what then is "actual" and how can I be made to perceive it?

 

Hoping you can clarify things here,

 


Headphones have a terrible time controlling neutral sub-bass response and the other frequencies without congestion. So the primitive solution with Grados is to just get rid of it and that's what they did. Now they sound fast and things seem to be better separated without having to control slow frequencies. If you like that kind of sound, then that's not for me to criticize but don't confuse it with an achievement.

 

Even then, I still hear a lot of congestion. I've heard it with almost any amplifier I've tried from solid states to hybrids to tubes. The upper mids is congestion galore. They emphasis the upper mids, yet they can not control it. People don't seem to mind it with electric guitar, which is obviously distortion. In slower genres, people don't seem to mind the slower drivers of Grados either.

 

In comparison, the Grado SR325i ($300 which I have owned) is NOT faster than a $160 CLOSED Ultrasone HFI 780. It is also not faster and has worse sub-bass response than a Sennheiser HD598 (regularly bought for $185). The SR125i was just a mess. They're good for bringing out the guitar (over the rest of the band) in case you're trying to copy the guitar parts of a song; otherwise, I didn't bother using them to listen to music.


Edited by wind016 - 8/20/11 at 3:28pm
post #20 of 21

I haven't herd the ad700 nor do I like metal, but i have been listining to my 325s lately and love there sound. Seems that they are unique in that the driver and housing rests on the ear togethor with the semitransparent foam souround and the "by ear" tailered sound, however the totality of the aforsead propertys combined with the driver being housed in an open metal cylinder has the poteincal with the right volume adjustment to create a balanced sphere like ombiance. wich is unlike any other, the angle of the drivers also sits perfectly flat on the ears wich will give the enclosure of the dirvers a slight angle much like the toe in of a speaker set up again somthing my t1 dont do as there angle is fixed inside the encloser and given the photos, the  ad700 as well.  What i like about grados is they take advantage of the fact that they are headdphones and do things speakers cant and during use  this becomes quite evident given the aforsaid reasons. not shure the new higher end models will have this same effect given there jumbo pads hopfully i will be able to find out for myself weather this totally agreeable "ambiance" is contained as it were within these new rather quite expensive models. 

post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by wind016 View Post

Headphones have a terrible time controlling neutral sub-bass response and the other frequencies without congestion. So the primitive solution with Grados is to just get rid of it and that's what they did. Now they sound fast and things seem to be better separated without having to control slow frequencies. If you like that kind of sound, then that's not for me to criticize but don't confuse it with an achievement.

 

Even then, I still hear a lot of congestion. I've heard it with almost any amplifier I've tried from solid states to hybrids to tubes. The upper mids is congestion galore. They emphasis the upper mids, yet they can not control it. People don't seem to mind it with electric guitar, which is obviously distortion. In slower genres, people don't seem to mind the slower drivers of Grados either.

 

In comparison, the Grado SR325i ($300 which I have owned) is NOT faster than a $160 CLOSED Ultrasone HFI 780. It is also not faster and has worse sub-bass response than a Sennheiser HD598 (regularly bought for $185). The SR125i was just a mess. They're good for bringing out the guitar (over the rest of the band) in case you're trying to copy the guitar parts of a song; otherwise, I didn't bother using them to listen to music.


Thank you for clearing that up. I think most of my problems hinged on the words "seems" and "actually". I do agree that the grados are lacking in sub-bass but for such cheap cans (the sr60 and maybe sr80 are a good deal but after that the diminishing returns kick in big time in the grado line) I think they do pretty well. I agree that the 598 is a big step up for that treble emphasized sound that still retains good sub-bass.

 

Are you any more enthused by the alessandro line? I've auditioned a friend's recabled ms-1 but I didn't listen to any metal on them. I'd like to open this question to everyone also. Let's talk alessandro's as well.

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