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post #31 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric_C View Post

I see...and the hearing range shrinks from the ends, right? As in, there are no instances where a person could have perfect hearing from 20Hz-20KHz, but have trouble with frequencies within that range (e.g. can't hear 10-11KHz properly)

 

No, this could happen. For example, if a person is exposed to very loud sounds in the 10-11 kHz range for long enough, he may have damage mostly in that region and may still be able to hear frequencies higher up in the range. Loss between 2-4 kHz is very common and yet those people with the loss may still hear higher and lower frequencies OK.
 

 

post #32 of 57

Fascinating! Thanks for the explanation Pianist. 

post #33 of 57

perfect hearing from 20-20K

 

Again, no normative data. All the norms are established from 250Hz - 8KHz, so how does one define "perfect hearing?"

 

A good read on hearing loss and the ageing (presbycusis) process.  http://www.ihsinfo.org/IhsV2/hearing_professional/2003/060_November-December/080_Presbycusis_A_Look_into_the_Aging_Inner_Ear.cfm 

 

 

Question:

 

I am wondering, those that post audio reviews of various audio equipment....  do they ever post their hearing test results?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. John Moulton

Here at Noble, we craft some of the finest universal and custom in-ear monitors available today. 

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post #34 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by FullCircle View Post

Question:

 

I am wondering, those that post audio reviews of various audio equipment....  do they ever post their hearing test results?

 


No more than people who review cameras or TVs post results of their eye and colour blindness tests, I'd imagine.

post #35 of 57

Also keep in mind that tinnitus is not always associated with hearing loss.

 

I, for example, have bad enough tinnitus in my left ear that it drives me crazy at times, but apparently according to the hearing test done by my ENT I have almost perfect hearing, except for a slight dip in the mid-high frequencies.

 

I got an MRI to rule out bone growth/tumor, etc. and the results were negative, so it looks like I'm just stuck with it. No caffeine, etc. - so the most likely explanation is that I got an ototoxic ear infection (which exhibited no outward symptoms) a few months ago, and there you go - lifetime tinnitus FTL.


Edited by Psychochink - 8/14/11 at 10:37pm
post #36 of 57

is this slight dip in your left ear?

Dr. John Moulton

Here at Noble, we craft some of the finest universal and custom in-ear monitors available today. 

Reply
post #37 of 57

I have skimmed through this thread so I apologise if  I missed this.

Ipods etc and levels. Surely this has to be iem dependent? with some harder/easier to drive than others?

 

What I will say is that when/if I use my ipod touch (via the headphone output) with IE8`s, MTPC the level is 75%. Yes They ring a bit afterwards but I hate the tv being loud soo not sure what that means.

I have always worked on the principle of music sounds better loud, maybe due to being a regular clubber in my 20`s. I also find iems sound their best louder and shows which fall over before your ears do.

post #38 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinth View Post

I have skimmed through this thread so I apologise if  I missed this.

Ipods etc and levels. Surely this has to be iem dependent? with some harder/easier to drive than others?

 

What I will say is that when/if I use my ipod touch (via the headphone output) with IE8`s, MTPC the level is 75%. Yes They ring a bit afterwards but I hate the tv being loud soo not sure what that means.

I have always worked on the principle of music sounds better loud, maybe due to being a regular clubber in my 20`s. I also find iems sound their best louder and shows which fall over before your ears do.


I'm 99.99999% sure that you are playing your iPod too loud due to the fact that you have ringing in your ears afterwards.  You have passed the point where hearing damage can occur at around 90-100dB (but before the threshold of pain which is 120 dB).  This is dangerous and can lead to hearing loss.  Clubs normally run around 110dB which is dangerous to your ears. 

 

post #39 of 57

Most probably. I asked my wife a week or two a go to listen to my X10`s. She has no interest at all with my "hobby" but she has made a playlist on grooveshark finally (netbook streams, output through our Denon hifi)

 

Anyways, With my X10`s she had the volume on my P3 at about 7 o`clock. I have it about 10 o`clock with those iems. My SE535`s 8-9 o`clock. I did change the amp from gain to no gain but have reverted back.

 

I know it isn`t a good idea to listen loud but there is an X point where it sounds "right" to me, not what is "correct/safe" if you know what I mean.

post #40 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinth View Post

Most probably. I asked my wife a week or two a go to listen to my X10`s. She has no interest at all with my "hobby" but she has made a playlist on grooveshark finally (netbook streams, output through our Denon hifi)

 

Anyways, With my X10`s she had the volume on my P3 at about 7 o`clock. I have it about 10 o`clock with those iems. My SE535`s 8-9 o`clock. I did change the amp from gain to no gain but have reverted back.

 

I know it isn`t a good idea to listen loud but there is an X point where it sounds "right" to me, not what is "correct/safe" if you know what I mean.

 

You can adjust to lower levels of sound, it takes time though for that point x to lower, but if no damage is permanent, it will lower..  If you don't stop, the point x will keep going up as time goes due to the accelerated hearing loss.  This loss will become permanent, but you may not have reached that point yet. 

 

post #41 of 57

I do understand and will try a slightly lower level in increments and see how I get on. I must be/have asking a little too much from my iems in terms of cohesion. The 535`s though and I suppose all that I have do a fine job at my level. If stress testing was required they have nearly all passed.

 

Edit: You can`t tell me when something sounds spot on you have not tweaked the volume up.


Edited by Sinth - 8/15/11 at 11:20am
post #42 of 57

wtf :|

 

I often listen to my phone @ 100% volume with my earphones...

post #43 of 57

See! I am not the only freak around here.

 

Edit: that is pushing it mate, not sure what you are listening to but the combination of phone and iem cannot sound pleasant. Certainly not a purist sound. 

 

 


Edited by Sinth - 8/15/11 at 11:52am
post #44 of 57

There's variables involved with what values you set your volume knob to: like what volume the song you are listening to is recorded at (gain), and sensitivity of your IEMs.  I replayGain all my music so I don't have to experience much unintentional volume variation, but before running everything through ReplayGain, I find song volumes to be all over the place.  And I tend to have to retweak the volume knob when I plug in a different set of IEMs, sometimes by a lot.  So don't concern yourselves too much with what other people have their volume knobs set to: they aren't listening to your your music on your setup.  Rule of thumb: If you think it's too loud, turn it down.  Feel free to blast it for a favorite song or three, but then bring it back down to comfortable listening levels.

post #45 of 57

Well said. Agree.

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