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The Official Head Fi Ear Wax Thread - Page 4

post #46 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mkubota1 View Post


Me too.  I'm thinking as long as you stay on the outer canal area, around where tri-flange IEM tips end, you should be fine.  I think what often happens is people get over-zealous and go too far or rub too hard.  It's like brushing your teeth- you actually can over-do it.  I think if my inner ear started to hurt and it didn't go away within a few days, I'd seek professional help.  Same thing with the eyes or any other part of my body I value greatly.  It's too much to risk playing doctor.  Heck- if I were a photographer and I lost one eye, I could still go on.  But if you lost hearing in on ear, in this hobby that would suck to say the least.  And while you're at the audiologist, you might as well get some impressions made for customs too!


That's because photos are in 2D Lol.
 

Btw while we're on this topic what causes "ringing" in ears? after loud music I usually don't even notice it (except for a club or a concert etc.), but if I go away to the countryside or some place really quiet, then I notice my ears are ringing (from listening to music with IEM's).

 

Also right now while my right ear is blocked I notice my right ear is ringing, but my left isn't, is that because my right ear is in a nice quiet place now while the wax is blocking more sound than usual from the outside world? =P

 

Sorry for OT from insects but I find it strange.

 

 

post #47 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiteki View Post




That's because photos are in 2D Lol.
 

Btw while we're on this topic what causes "ringing" in ears? after loud music I usually don't even notice it (except for a club or a concert etc.), but if I go away to the countryside or some place really quiet, then I notice my ears are ringing (from listening to music with IEM's).

 

Also right now while my right ear is blocked I notice my right ear is ringing, but my left isn't, is that because my right ear is in a nice quiet place now while the wax is blocking more sound than usual from the outside world? =P

 

Sorry for OT from insects but I find it strange.

 

 



If it's directly after using IEMs or after the club, then it could be temporary damage (this can turn permanent though).  Lower the volume you're playing your music at.  90dB is the point where this damage can occur.  I'm normally below 80dB myself (which is still pretty loud).  You'll be surprised how easy it is to push IEMs to 90+dB.  33% is walking the 87-90dB mark.  Above that can begin to cause damage. 

 

I have had random spurts that happen while I lay down or just sit in a quiet room (I don't even have to have listened to anything that day)...  I don't know the cause of this...  It could be ear wax, since it is only my right ear (my left was the bugged one that got cleaned :p).  If it continues, go see a doctor, they'll be able to figure out for sure. 

post #48 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post





Deep insertion IEM tips can't push ear wax as deep (triflanges can't do this either) like Q-Tips can, they still can't reach in as far either.  You do make a good point though, we do push some ear wax deeper each time we use IEMs, but it's not as deep as a Q-Tip.  A Q-Tip can go much deeper than an IEM due to it's size and collapsable tip.  An IEM tip can only go so far due to the tips size or the IEM's size.  It depends on how deeply you shove the Q-Tip in.  If it passes the point of what IEMs allow (I couldn't get my Etys with small tri-flanges in as deep as I could a Q-TIp) but still not have pain involved, then it begins to become a problem.

The key word is "can". A Q-tip CAN be inserted deeper than say a triple flange tip. I just use common sense. I don't insert the Q-tips too deep, about as far as the flanges. I spin the Q-tip in a circular motion at the outer portion of the ear. Never a problem for me.
post #49 of 93

Thanks for your input, well I'm not that concerned about the actual ringing, just curious what causes it. The ringing just happens after loud music or loud IEM use and then it goes away, no problemo, what I find weird is that they seem to ring more in really quiet environments, and right now my right ear (blocked) is ringing, perhaps just because my right ear is in a quiet environment now?

People think I use IEM's at a pretty high volume, I usually use weaker DAP's close to or on max volume, but whenever I go to a concert or club I think it's extremely loud sometimes with window-shaking bass and no one is complaining? confused.gif

post #50 of 93

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RADI0HEAD View Post


The key word is "can". A Q-tip CAN be inserted deeper than say a triple flange tip. I just use common sense. I don't insert the Q-tips too deep, about as far as the flanges.

 

The Etyrapic medium size triple-flange is what has caused my ear-block, I think it's even worse than a Q-tip because it's large and a "perfect fit" so it probably pushed the wax into my ear more effectively than a Q-tip would have done.

 

Not saying Etymotic is bad or anything, just my unfortunate experience. =(

 

post #51 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiteki View Post

Thanks for your input, well I'm not that concerned about the actual ringing, just curious what causes it. The ringing just happens after loud music or loud IEM use and then it goes away, no problemo, what I find weird is that they seem to ring more in really quiet environments, and right now my right ear (blocked) is ringing, perhaps just because my right ear is in a quiet environment now?

People think I use IEM's at a pretty high volume, I usually use weaker DAP's close to or on max volume, but whenever I go to a concert or club I think it's extremely loud sometimes with window-shaking bass and no one is complaining? confused.gif


I think this might actually be due to some hearing damage then since it happens when it does.  I'd get an audiologist to confirm though.  Lower the volume of your IEMs before you do get something permanent. 

 

At the club, it's normally skimming around 100-110dB.  120dB is the threshold of pain (where you begin to feel pain).  Lots of people listen to their IEMs this loud without knowing it.  Nothing should ever be 100%, even if weak

post #52 of 93

I don't have hearing damage Lol I can pick up small sounds very well like if my mobile phone is ringing in a different room while I'm in the shower.  Perhaps you're just not familiar with this "ringing" phenonemon =p

 

I noticed you said you have "random spurts", you are probably talking about the really high pitched sound that comes and goes for about 10 seconds right? that's not what I'm talking about =p

post #53 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiteki View Post

 

 

The Etyrapic medium size triple-flange is what has caused my ear-block, I think it's even worse than a Q-tip because it's large and a "perfect fit" so it probably pushed the wax into my ear more effectively than a Q-tip would have done.

 

Not saying Etymotic is bad or anything, just my unfortunate experience. =(

 


Everyone is different. I've been using triple flange tips for years. They're my tip of choice and even use them on iems they were not designed for.
post #54 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiteki View Post

I don't have hearing damage Lol I can pick up small sounds very well like if my mobile phone is ringing in a different room while I'm in the shower.  Perhaps you're just not familiar with this "ringing" phenonemon =p

 

I noticed you said you have "random spurts", you are probably talking about the really high pitched sound that comes and goes for about 10 seconds right? that's not what I'm talking about =p



Maybe it is a different phenonemon...  Its the fact that you said it happens after being exposed to loud noises/IEMs that flaged damage causing sound. 

 

I haven't had a spurt in about the last month.  I think they went away, I have been playing IEMs at a lower volume lately too, that could be the cause of them going away.  I used to listen to my iPod at 50% volume (IDK how loud it was though, I've gone down 3-4 clicks on my iPod now) :p  They normally were only 2-3 seconds long (not 10). 

post #55 of 93

I think the high-pitched noises that last from 2s to 10s are either imaginary (example: our mind doing a test-pattern check, or turning off a filter temporarily to check if the filter still needs to be in place) or physical (example: our ear repairing itself with some kind of lubricant or enzyme that causes short high-pitched sounds).

 

 

post #56 of 93

People, please... let's keep it OT.  Crusty, hairy, sticky, smelly earwax!  tongue.gif  j/k  Did anyone see that episode of Mythbusters where they went around collecting earwax to see if it would make a good candle?  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-_ihZNrnN4  Yummy...

post #57 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiteki View Post

Thanks for your input, well I'm not that concerned about the actual ringing, just curious what causes it. The ringing just happens after loud music or loud IEM use and then it goes away, no problemo, what I find weird is that they seem to ring more in really quiet environments, and right now my right ear (blocked) is ringing, perhaps just because my right ear is in a quiet environment now?

People think I use IEM's at a pretty high volume, I usually use weaker DAP's close to or on max volume, but whenever I go to a concert or club I think it's extremely loud sometimes with window-shaking bass and no one is complaining? confused.gif


If you're experiencing ringing (tinnitus), you should definitely see an audiologist. Start getting annual hearing tests. You hear the ringing more prominently in quiet spaces because it's generated internally and there's less masking effect in a quiet space.

 

Hearing loss is usually slow-onset and thus difficult to track without a regimen of testing. The fact that it happens after a high-volume experience and then goes away is a strong indicator that you're overexposing yourself. Progressive loss can be slowed or stopped by adopting smart listening habits.

 

post #58 of 93
I recommend keeping a cat handy to dispose of large insects.

Though I cannot recommend trying to put a cat in your ear.
post #59 of 93

i wonder why the shower stream is not effective. they have the same principal as the syringe...maybe the water is not strong enough??

 

by the way , how can we know whether our eardrum was damaged?? 

post #60 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by jammerlee711 View Post

i wonder why the shower stream is not effective. they have the same principal as the syringe...maybe the water is not strong enough??

 

by the way , how can we know whether our eardrum was damaged?? 



You can only damage your ear drum by rupturing through it.  You'll know when this happens as you'll in major pain.  The ear drum will naturally let water in if there is too much pressure to avoid this happening.  A damaged eardrum requires immediate medical attention and can end in some serious hearing loss.

 

The shower/steam works in the same idea as the candle, you'll melt the wax away, it doesn't work too well unfortunately, instead, you can end up with water in your middle ear, which doesn't hurt, but is annoying and can cause bacteria growth...  It can't be removed unless it evaporates/goes through the Eustachian tube. 

 

The reason why the pressure works is because it's a lot of pressure, but for very little time.  The little time ensures you get as little water in your middle ear. When you use the syringe technique, you want the water between room temperature and body temperature to avoid burning your ear.  So it's actually a much lower temperature than steam.

 

Other notes:

  • For a small amount of ear wax (a healthy amount), steam, heat (candle), dissolving, other home remedies will work.
  • It's not healthy to remove ear wax if you have a healthy amount, ear wax is there for immune reasons, and it also keeps your ear dry to help aid against bacteria growth.
  • If you have an unhealthy amount of earwax (too much), then the home remedies that dissolve/melt the earwax away won't work (they aren't strong enough unless you physically damage the skin in your ear canal/flood your middle ear).

Edited by tinyman392 - 8/5/11 at 11:21pm
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