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Headphones for studio use.

post #1 of 41
Thread Starter 
Hey guys im new to this site but not the audio world. Im looking for some good head phones for referecing. So far I own Sony MDR7506, BD DT770, Beats by Dre, Sony MDR V700. But they arent that great for referecing, they are all closed so they sound a little boomy.

So far im looking at ($150 - $250)

Sennheiser HD595
Sennheiser HD555
Beyerdynamic DT990
Beyerdynamic DT880

I don't really know which to buy. I use Mackie MR5s as my main monitors, but I need some good cans to reference in. I will be driving the headphones through a presonus amp so amplification isnt a problem.
post #2 of 41
Thread Starter 
DT880 is out of the question, i want all the way open.
post #3 of 41

What........?

 

Do you want Headphones for studio work? Balanced and neutral

 

About the best I can think of are Sony MDR-7509HD

 

But you want Open cans that are best for Rock

 

So what do you want? Pro Audio Cans or Audiophile cans

 

Because it just sounds like you're a Audiophile here.

post #4 of 41

AKG K271's I think would suit your needs. Quite neutral, a little light on bass, but it's not boomy by any stretch of the word.

 

EDIT: Oh, just saw you want one that's open. Do you actually want open, or are you just thinking that's the only way to prevent boomy bass? If you want something that's open, I'd imagine the K601's would be good for reference, as they are very flat, though they lack a little extension on the top end.


Edited by Kukuk - 7/26/11 at 1:35am
post #5 of 41

Do you want a open neutral can? I'd say HD600 is a good choice. 

post #6 of 41

I don't think those cans you have are boomy because they're closed. They're boomy because they're boomy.

Point of information: 880 is not boomy in the slightest despite it being semi-open, and is for all intents and purposes open--I could hear outside noise with my 880 on just as easily as with my AD300 and MS-1, when I still had the latter 2.

 

Try checking out the $99 cans by KRK: http://www.head-fi.org/forum/thread/560605/krk-kns-6400-review-impressive-99-giant-killer

post #7 of 41
Thread Starter 
Ok thanx for all the suggestions. To clear somethings up, I produce and mix audio so i would like some good cans to reference in. I hear open headphones arw the best because the bass doesnt feel trapped and you dont get the clogged sound effect. I will chech out some of your suggestions.
post #8 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric_C View Post

I don't think those cans you have are boomy because they're closed. They're boomy because they're boomy.

Point of information: 880 is not boomy in the slightest despite it being semi-open, and is for all intents and purposes open--I could hear outside noise with my 880 on just as easily as with my AD300 and MS-1, when I still had the latter 2.

 

Try checking out the $99 cans by KRK: http://www.head-fi.org/forum/thread/560605/krk-kns-6400-review-impressive-99-giant-killer


"boomy"

 

I'm thinking that's what "impact" is also

 

So OP needs a very boring headphone then

 

Apple Earbuds?

 

post #9 of 41
Thread Starter 
No I need/want something flat, or nearly flat. No dramatically boostef frequencies.
post #10 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keyflo View Post

No I need/want something flat, or nearly flat. No dramatically boostef frequencies.


AKG are the flat-est you can find around your price, but they necenssarily balanced

 

But I think a neutral balanced can works a lot better.

 

With a flat can, there is no play with the audio

 

With a balanced can, there is no play that might intrude upon the music

 

This can be argued, but I know that people would rather listen to a Balanced can then a flat can because it doesn't add anything to the music but shows it as it should be. 

post #11 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keyflo View Post

DT880 is out of the question, i want all the way open.


Don't fall for that "semi-open" crap.  They are open, and they might be your best choice--they are really neutral, with a wide soundstage and just the right amount of bass for getting a reference feel.

post #12 of 41

For my studio use, Shure SRH940. Great for checking mixes on, great for their relatively flat response. Now remember NEVER mix on headphones they don't tell you the truth to what you are mixing. So with that said, as you know it is all about translation, how do your mixes translate from your studio monitors to apple ear buds, to Martin Logan speakers, to computer speakers, to car stereos etc. Ideally you want it sounding good on everything you can play it back on. Yes headphones is one of your targets, but headphones lie like a rug, when mixing in relation to translation to other systems. 

post #13 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by BotByte View Post





AKG are the flat-est you can find around your price, but they necenssarily balanced

 

But I think a neutral balanced can works a lot better.

 

With a flat can, there is no play with the audio

 

With a balanced can, there is no play that might intrude upon the music

 

This can be argued, but I know that people would rather listen to a Balanced can then a flat can because it doesn't add anything to the music but shows it as it should be. 


I'm sorry, but I really don't follow what the difference is between flat and balanced. Could you give examples of what you consider flat, and what you consider balanced?

post #14 of 41

The K-702 is the best studio monitor hps... reference hps can be basically any hps...because reference hps are very open to various interpretations, can be a reference to classic music, or to club music, or even a reference to boom box.

 

Here is more info: http://www.head-fi.org/forum/thread/393139/k702-in-the-studio


Edited by Acix - 7/26/11 at 8:40am
post #15 of 41

Quote:Originally Posted by Acix 

"The K-702 is the best studio monitor hps... reference hps can be basically any hps...because reference hps are very open to various interpretations, can be a reference to classic music, or to club music, or even a reference to boom box.
Here is more info: http://www.head-fi.org/forum/thread/393139/k702-in-the-studio"


The thing not mention was what amp or DAC the OP will be using. The K70x is amp dependent. Other headphones mentioned in this thread are also somewhat dependent on an amp but the AKG is particularly picky.

I would also suggest using two different cans for your purposes since no two headphones will be the same. No matter how flat/balanced/neutral they claim to be.


Edited by baka1969 - 7/26/11 at 11:02am
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