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Asian music (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) - Page 103

post #1531 of 2137
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

...

 

But all in all, I find the sounds interesting and I don't judge the compositions holistically because I realize they are what they are. I take out of it what I enjoy and leave the rest of it alone, pretentious attitude and all. As long as the experience is an interesting one. I understand what you're saying though.

I can enjoy my more "normal" compositions, and I can enjoy these fun little sounds as well, and I can make a reasonable discernment between the two.

 

Everything else, I'm glad you enjoy. I'm going to continue posting weird things though - partly because I don't have a clear definition on where the threshold between you and me would fall apart and I don't think it should affect anything that I do anyways. The other part - well, there are a couple of like-minded people out-of-the-forums that seem to react rather positively to it.

 

...

 

On the other hand; obscurity for the sake of obscurity, or diversity for the sake of diversity isn't cool either. I don't think anyone's trying to do that though. I think the problem is that some people find it hard, at a deeper level, to accept that other people might enjoy other things, and that those things can be enjoyable in the first place.

Great response. 

 

I wouldn't want anyone to stop positing the music they like. My comment was really just making conversation about the music in the thread, since part of the fun of the thread is to discuss how we feel about the music itself (along with other things, like the visuals, the stylistic choices, the cultural idiosyncrasies, the time periods, etc). 

 

A musician friend of mine from way back in high school--he is a great example of someone who can play more conventional styles (he's a keyboard player), but chooses to do really avant-garde stuff, such as musique concrète, ambient noise, and combining that modern dance, and he is still doing that now, in his 40's. To have remained deeply in that avant-garde mindset all these years, there must be something about it that fascinates him, and I can totally understand the intellectual motivations behind it. It's basically the aural equivalent of the whole modern art debate. So much of modern art lives and dies by the intellectual ideas behind them, but the work themselves are often not what anyone would want to have prolonged contact with. Yes, the pieces have sociopolitical messages, and as delivery vehicles for those ideas, they're effective, but I wouldn't want a print of it or put the original piece in my home, or have it as a wallpaper on my desktop, or even own a book about the works. With music, it's the same. The really oddball experimental stuff that lacks musicality--I can appreciate whatever intellectual point the musicians wanted to make, but I wouldn't listen to it for enjoyment.

 

I'm definitely not one of those people who resists music that's not "pleasant." As a composer, I do listen to a lot of very complex and challenging stuff, and there's a lot of music in my collection that most people would never think of listening to for leisure, such as really terrifying cues from horror movies and games--music that messes with you psychologically and freaks you out. There's also avant-garde, death metal, really experimental IDM, obscure ethnic music, etc--most are not what the average person would want to ever listen to, because most of it is not pleasing the way conventional genres are. But there's always a certain level of musicality in all of them, and whatever ideas behind them are conveyed with enough musical quality to still be unmistakably music.

 

I think the threshold for me, is how much the basic building blocks of musical quality are used--elements like rhythm, melody, harmonic structure, arrangement, as well as exploration of timbre, texture, and progression. Even if only very few of those elements are used, if they are used in a musical manner, it still works (for example, factory noises used as rhythmic element, and the various noises are used for their unique timbre and texture, and there's a sense of musical development). If it's just random factory noises, then musically it become pointless to me, because it simply sounds like field recording of a factory, and if I wanted to listen to that, I would buy one of those "Hollywood folly effects/sound design" libraries instead of buying music. Adding aimless distorted guitar feedback noises to it, and maybe the ghostly moaning of some drugged out guy, would only add more layers of unmusical elements. But if the factory noises, the guitar feedback, and the ghostly moans were to be given to let's say an electronic musician that likes to cut up samples and arrange/layer them in a musical manner that's very clever, then those exact same elements would now take on a whole new life that's much more musical than just random/aimless noises without any sense of interesting development. Now, I know some of the experimental stuff you posted does fall into that category, where there's a certain sense of musicality, but (and this is where personal bias comes in), the musical sensibility just didn't appeal to me.

 

Anyway, just making conversation. :) 

 

BTW, I actually have a list of the music I love on my website (along with my favorite movies, TV shows, books, artists, photographers, etc), and anyone interested could take a look here: http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/about_me/influences.htm  


Edited by Lunatique - 2/22/14 at 11:59am
post #1532 of 2137

And the prize for actually not making music with musical instruments goes to:

I actually thought this was an asian MUSIC thread.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post
 

post #1533 of 2137
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShooterMacG View Post

And the prize for actually not making music with musical instruments goes to:

I actually thought this was an asian MUSIC thread.

Hey now, I like some ambient noise when I'm very focussed on work and don't want any lyrics or melodies messing with my zen.

post #1534 of 2137

Sam Kim

 

 

 

 

Bernard Park

 

 

 

 

post #1535 of 2137
Gackt is pretty awesome sometimes. I saw his newest singles album at a local bookstore today and I thought I'd post some of my favourite songs from him.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P.S._I_Love_U_%28Gackt_song%29

This is brilliant.


And this:


So catchy!


And this:


This was the music video that got me interested in his music when I saw it for the first time on the big screen at Sakura-Con a few years ago. Gackt really brings music videos to a whole new level in my opinion; you don't get the same experience with other artists.




You can't forget about his time with Malice Mizer either.



This is quite simply one of the best and most beautiful songs I've ever heard! R.I.P. Kami...

Edited by miceblue - 2/24/14 at 1:57am
post #1536 of 2137

lol Gackt...when I saw that name, I immediately thought of a silly video clip where he demonstrated the use of a "crotch splitter." I'm not going to post that here...but it gave me a good chuckle.

post #1537 of 2137

post #1538 of 2137

2013 - HURRICANE MIXER

 

 

Enjoying this one very much atm! 

 

Sakamoto Masayuki and Matsu Takako - Kemono no Souja Erin Original Soundtrack 2

 

 

Also really liking this one! 


Edited by Mshenay - 2/25/14 at 6:50pm
post #1539 of 2137
Quote:
Originally Posted by L0SLobos View Post
 

Hey now, I like some ambient noise when I'm very focussed on work and don't want any lyrics or melodies messing with my zen.

I was going to give you some recommendations for music that's especially good for concentrating on mental-intensive work, but then I thought I should just start a new thread for it. You can check out my recommendations here: http://www.head-fi.org/t/708111/non-distracting-ambient-music-to-help-with-concentration-when-doing-mental-intensive-work

post #1540 of 2137
Speaking of which, I should really focus on some work at the moment instead of tapping along to this song:



Wow, that fast part is just incredible! notbad.jpg

Edited by miceblue - 3/5/14 at 8:35am
post #1541 of 2137
Two of my recent favorites

 


Edited by infam0ussteven - 3/5/14 at 12:52pm
post #1542 of 2137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunatique View Post
 

Great response. 

 

I wouldn't want anyone to stop positing the music they like. My comment was really just making conversation about the music in the thread, since part of the fun of the thread is to discuss how we feel about the music itself (along with other things, like the visuals, the stylistic choices, the cultural idiosyncrasies, the time periods, etc). 

 

A musician friend of mine from way back in high school--he is a great example of someone who can play more conventional styles (he's a keyboard player), but chooses to do really avant-garde stuff, such as musique concrète, ambient noise, and combining that modern dance, and he is still doing that now, in his 40's. To have remained deeply in that avant-garde mindset all these years, there must be something about it that fascinates him, and I can totally understand the intellectual motivations behind it. It's basically the aural equivalent of the whole modern art debate. So much of modern art lives and dies by the intellectual ideas behind them, but the work themselves are often not what anyone would want to have prolonged contact with. Yes, the pieces have sociopolitical messages, and as delivery vehicles for those ideas, they're effective, but I wouldn't want a print of it or put the original piece in my home, or have it as a wallpaper on my desktop, or even own a book about the works. With music, it's the same. The really oddball experimental stuff that lacks musicality--I can appreciate whatever intellectual point the musicians wanted to make, but I wouldn't listen to it for enjoyment.

 

I'm definitely not one of those people who resists music that's not "pleasant." As a composer, I do listen to a lot of very complex and challenging stuff, and there's a lot of music in my collection that most people would never think of listening to for leisure, such as really terrifying cues from horror movies and games--music that messes with you psychologically and freaks you out. There's also avant-garde, death metal, really experimental IDM, obscure ethnic music, etc--most are not what the average person would want to ever listen to, because most of it is not pleasing the way conventional genres are. But there's always a certain level of musicality in all of them, and whatever ideas behind them are conveyed with enough musical quality to still be unmistakably music.

 

I think the threshold for me, is how much the basic building blocks of musical quality are used--elements like rhythm, melody, harmonic structure, arrangement, as well as exploration of timbre, texture, and progression. Even if only very few of those elements are used, if they are used in a musical manner, it still works (for example, factory noises used as rhythmic element, and the various noises are used for their unique timbre and texture, and there's a sense of musical development). If it's just random factory noises, then musically it become pointless to me, because it simply sounds like field recording of a factory, and if I wanted to listen to that, I would buy one of those "Hollywood folly effects/sound design" libraries instead of buying music. Adding aimless distorted guitar feedback noises to it, and maybe the ghostly moaning of some drugged out guy, would only add more layers of unmusical elements. But if the factory noises, the guitar feedback, and the ghostly moans were to be given to let's say an electronic musician that likes to cut up samples and arrange/layer them in a musical manner that's very clever, then those exact same elements would now take on a whole new life that's much more musical than just random/aimless noises without any sense of interesting development. Now, I know some of the experimental stuff you posted does fall into that category, where there's a certain sense of musicality, but (and this is where personal bias comes in), the musical sensibility just didn't appeal to me.

 

Anyway, just making conversation. :) 

 

BTW, I actually have a list of the music I love on my website (along with my favorite movies, TV shows, books, artists, photographers, etc), and anyone interested could take a look here: http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/about_me/influences.htm  

Sorry for the (late) response, but since your response was so thorough I was hesitant to post something since it'd likely would have been forced and of little value. All in all, I can only say that I agree wholeheartedly with the above.

 

And I've enjoyed it a lot as well. There's been a lot of banter and nowhere near the amount of discussions as was earlier on in the thread. I'm not harshing on banter or on the mood of the thread, and I'm not intending to put pressure on anyone to always have intellectually stimulating conversations. That's something that a lot of the music threads, on and off the forum, do - take themselves too seriously. And it's not at all enjoyable. No one likes ot when that elitist and pretensious overtone looms over the thread. Light-hearted is always good and so is not taking anything on the internet too seriously. But when people stop having discussions, it's almost as if we've run out of things to say. I hope that isn't the case. This is one of the more interesting topics available on the subforum.

 

I've also worked through the list on your site (I remember reading through that list and your site in general. quite a while back, but I can't recall exactly why). I just had to crack open my copy of A Clockwork Orange afterwards. Great movie. Very enthralling.

post #1543 of 2137

I like Lee Sang Eun (or Tzsche, whatever you want to call her). But I would also go and check out the stuff from other artists this guy has uploaded. Very soothing, the ones with English lyrics are quite beautiful as well. A great collection of stuff that's otherwise hard to find overseas because of the age.

 

 

post #1544 of 2137

I feel old school today. Nothing beats old school anime sound tracks.

 

Slam Dunk!

 

 

Dragon Ball Z

 

 

post #1545 of 2137

Here is another from golden years of Anime.  An anime that was way ahead of it's time in 1984 n terms of animation production.  "do you remember love?"  Mari Iijima 1984 Live Ai oboedeimasuka

 

 


Edited by SilverEars - 3/8/14 at 6:21am
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