Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Asian music (Chinese, Japanese, Korean)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Asian music (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) - Page 70

post #1036 of 1602

The Back Horn is a great band.

I listened to LEOs debut album some month ago but not one of the songs caught my attention, too bad :/

post #1037 of 1602

Just found out about this thread. Maybe I should share some of my personal all-time favs, mostly mainstream stuff

 

I just love her...

 

This song made me enter the audio scene. When I was at 7th grade, I bought an iPod Nano because of this MV lol. It was my first ever audio-related purchase.

 

This song made me cry for so many times..

 

Really love the meaning of this song, while they managed not to make it too sad and boring.

 

At least to me, the first album of Brown Eyed Girls is AMAZING!!!!!

 

They're just so amazing.. yet so underrated


Edited by W1CKED - 7/30/13 at 11:57am
post #1038 of 1602

Can attest to the old BEG R&B stuff being gold. Shame people only know them from those songs about Pokemon (haha puns).

 

Don't hate me for loving Mong back in the day....

post #1039 of 1602

Listening to the new BEG album now and I love it, reminds me of the older releases with a bit more electronics around

post #1040 of 1602

Yep, Black Box brings back that good ol' image. Been finding new stuff coming out left and right, very happy with it all.

 

Also shifting my weight from L.E.G.O into Secret Time territory. Both are my favourite current groups (which is saying a lot), but dug up old Secret videos and have been really binging on them ever since.

 

But enough about shallow ol' k-pop...

 

post #1041 of 1602
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

But enough about shallow ol' k-pop...

 

 

 

As much as I enjoy the catchy, mindless, sugary taste that is K-Pop's allure, I wish the other segments of the Korean music market would be noticed as well, such as the indie and rock scene.

 

Unfortunately, the average human being has been proven to prefer mindless music wallpaper instead of thought-provoking and creatively complex music, and that is why K-Pop has taken the world by storm. It is also the reason why mainstream pop has historically always dominated the charts around the world--it's just the law of the lowest common denominator. Exceptions are few and far between, and only in countries that are highly advanced and sophisticated in their entertainment and art and overall taste would you see non-mainstream music regularly top the charts alongside the pop acts.

 

What's interesting is that Korea is an advanced country in many ways, yet its music industry has always been quite shallow, and now they've honed that shallowness to a laser-point and made it into a science, and the rest of the world is eating it up like it's crack. 

 

I can't help but think all the Korean indie/rock artists/bands are saying to themselves, "What the hell? What about us? We make great music and the world doesn't give a ****, yet all the corporate-funded, systematically trained, PR-managed to death idols with songs that are conceptually at the level of middle-school children are being worshiped by millions around the world."

post #1042 of 1602

I picked up a lot of great music while in Japan! These are only a few of my favorites:

 

Sekai no Owari just came out of nowhere and blew everyone away, including me. biggrin.gif

 

 

The singer from Sekai no Owari collaborated with livetune on this song, and the result is great!

 

 

One of the sweetest love songs I've heard yet...

 

post #1043 of 1602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunatique View Post

As much as I enjoy the catchy, mindless, sugary taste that is K-Pop's allure, I wish the other segments of the Korean music market would be noticed as well, such as the indie and rock scene.

 

Unfortunately, the average human being has been proven to prefer mindless music wallpaper instead of thought-provoking and creatively complex music, and that is why K-Pop has taken the world by storm. It is also the reason why mainstream pop has historically always dominated the charts around the world--it's just the law of the lowest common denominator. Exceptions are few and far between, and only in countries that are highly advanced and sophisticated in their entertainment and art and overall taste would you see non-mainstream music regularly top the charts alongside the pop acts.

 

What's interesting is that Korea is an advanced country in many ways, yet its music industry has always been quite shallow, and now they've honed that shallowness to a laser-point and made it into a science, and the rest of the world is eating it up like it's crack. 

 

I can't help but think all the Korean indie/rock artists/bands are saying to themselves, "What the hell? What about us? We make great music and the world doesn't give a ****, yet all the corporate-funded, systematically trained, PR-managed to death idols with songs that are conceptually at the level of middle-school children are being worshiped by millions around the world."

I'm not speaking for everyone, but there are cases where these indie bands have members who grew up, or actually originated from overseas (the lead singer of the Black Skirts being an example, Clazzi going to college right up north would be another more recognizable example). They get the view of their country's music from an international stance. And yet they still go back and stick with the smaller market. To them it's more about grabbing hold of a smaller niche and gaining a more dedicated fanbase. Some music is simply not for modern consumption. They can adapt to that.

 

And of course there are always positives to a niche market (and a niche market within a niche market, well..). Elitism being lampooned as being a bad thing, can be a bad thing. The more largely populated, consumptuous, but fleeting fanbase who pick up on these new exotic fad, are simply that - fleeting. And while in the end they'll still accumulate the higher revenue, there's no consistency from person to person. The system is what's consistent, not the individuals. So in a sense these bands play it out smarter by sticking to a local consumer base, intentional or not.

 

Then there's cultural differences. Pop, in a lot of respects, is westernized. If I were to go outside right now and stand in the streets playing Mongolian-classical experimental ambient drone....exactly. But if I were to go out, churn out a KARA song, without the lyrics, and start dancing, it'd probably garner a more palpable response.

 

If people wish to simply indulge in the idea, and subculture of music, power to them. And that's really what's happen on many levels - fact is that not everyone really likes music. That's where the advance-ness has gone and went. They've created an industry that churns out another world unto itself and it's ingenious in many ways.

 

There also seems to be some sort of unspoken rule that everyone must enjoy music, and on a deeply psychological and primal level I'm sure they do. But there's really no reason why this should be true on a more shallow level.

Take this - I for one have absolutely no interest in car. No particular agenda, bias, just never had the opportunity to do so. But they fulfill my need for transportation, and I am content with that. A person can just as well feel the same with music. 

 

In short: I'm fine with people liking what they like, and if they happen to not like things I like. Let them eat cake.


Right, right, music - 


Edited by TwinQY - 8/3/13 at 7:42pm
post #1044 of 1602
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunatique View Post

As much as I enjoy the catchy, mindless, sugary taste that is K-Pop's allure, I wish the other segments of the Korean music market would be noticed as well, such as the indie and rock scene.

 

Unfortunately, the average human being has been proven to prefer mindless music wallpaper instead of thought-provoking and creatively complex music, and that is why K-Pop has taken the world by storm. It is also the reason why mainstream pop has historically always dominated the charts around the world--it's just the law of the lowest common denominator. Exceptions are few and far between, and only in countries that are highly advanced and sophisticated in their entertainment and art and overall taste would you see non-mainstream music regularly top the charts alongside the pop acts.

 

What's interesting is that Korea is an advanced country in many ways, yet its music industry has always been quite shallow, and now they've honed that shallowness to a laser-point and made it into a science, and the rest of the world is eating it up like it's crack. 

 

I can't help but think all the Korean indie/rock artists/bands are saying to themselves, "What the hell? What about us? We make great music and the world doesn't give a ****, yet all the corporate-funded, systematically trained, PR-managed to death idols with songs that are conceptually at the level of middle-school children are being worshiped by millions around the world."

I'm not speaking for everyone, but there are cases where these indie bands have members who grew up, or actually originated from overseas (the lead singer of the Black Skirts being an example, Clazzi going to college right up north would be another more recognizable example). They get the view of their country's music from an international stance. And yet they still go back and stick with the smaller market. To them it's more about grabbing hold of a smaller niche and gaining a more dedicated fanbase. Some music is simply not for modern consumption. They can adapt to that.

 

And of course there are always positives to a niche market (and a niche market within a niche market, well..). Elitism being lampooned as being a bad thing, can be a bad thing. The more largely populated, consumptuous, but fleeting fanbase who pick up on these new exotic fad, are simply that - fleeting. And while in the end they'll still accumulate the higher revenue, there's no consistency from person to person. The system is what's consistent, not the individuals. So in a sense these bands play it out smarter by sticking to a local consumer base, intentional or not.

 

Then there's cultural differences. Pop, in a lot of respects, is westernized. If I were to go outside right now and stand in the streets playing Mongolian-classical experimental ambient drone....exactly. But if I were to go out, churn out a KARA song, without the lyrics, and start dancing, it'd probably garner a more palpable response.

 

If people wish to simply indulge in the idea, and subculture of music, power to them. And that's really what's happen on many levels - fact is that not everyone really likes music. That's where the advance-ness has gone and went. They've created an industry that churns out another world unto itself and it's ingenious in many ways.

 

There also seems to be some sort of unspoken rule that everyone must enjoy music, and on a deeply psychological and primal level I'm sure they do. But there's really no reason why this should be true on a more shallow level.

Take this - I for one have absolutely no interest in car. No particular agenda, bias, just never had the opportunity to do so. But they fulfill my need for transportation, and I am content with that. A person can just as well feel the same with music. 

 

In short: I'm fine with people liking what they like, and if they happen to not like things I like. Let them eat cake.


Right, right, music - 

 

Wow...that was beautiful.

post #1045 of 1602

^^ It's a very nice song, yep.

I'm not a fan of when they insert lyrics into stuff with that sort of vibe arbitrarily, but sometimes it works out.

And if you don't mind the lyrics, i-dep might work out. Not as spatial or chilled-out (it's FreeTEMPO after all).

Takeshi (guy behind FreeTEMPO) does OSTs as well-

 

And this one's really not similar, but still putting it out there - 


Edited by TwinQY - 8/3/13 at 8:54pm
post #1046 of 1602
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

I'm not speaking for everyone, but there are cases where these indie bands have members who grew up, or actually originated from overseas (the lead singer of the Black Skirts being an example, Clazzi going to college right up north would be another more recognizable example). They get the view of their country's music from an international stance. And yet they still go back and stick with the smaller market. To them it's more about grabbing hold of a smaller niche and gaining a more dedicated fanbase. Some music is simply not for modern consumption. They can adapt to that.

 

And of course there are always positives to a niche market (and a niche market within a niche market, well..). Elitism being lampooned as being a bad thing, can be a bad thing. The more largely populated, consumptuous, but fleeting fanbase who pick up on these new exotic fad, are simply that - fleeting. And while in the end they'll still accumulate the higher revenue, there's no consistency from person to person. The system is what's consistent, not the individuals. So in a sense these bands play it out smarter by sticking to a local consumer base, intentional or not.

 

Then there's cultural differences. Pop, in a lot of respects, is westernized. If I were to go outside right now and stand in the streets playing Mongolian-classical experimental ambient drone....exactly. But if I were to go out, churn out a KARA song, without the lyrics, and start dancing, it'd probably garner a more palpable response.

 

If people wish to simply indulge in the idea, and subculture of music, power to them. And that's really what's happen on many levels - fact is that not everyone really likes music. That's where the advance-ness has gone and went. They've created an industry that churns out another world unto itself and it's ingenious in many ways.

 

There also seems to be some sort of unspoken rule that everyone must enjoy music, and on a deeply psychological and primal level I'm sure they do. But there's really no reason why this should be true on a more shallow level.

Take this - I for one have absolutely no interest in car. No particular agenda, bias, just never had the opportunity to do so. But they fulfill my need for transportation, and I am content with that. A person can just as well feel the same with music. 

 

In short: I'm fine with people liking what they like, and if they happen to not like things I like. Let them eat cake.


Right, right, music - 

 

 

i dont like the music you posted, now give me cake

post #1047 of 1602

post #1048 of 1602
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

I'm not speaking for everyone, but there are cases where these indie bands have members who grew up, or actually originated from overseas (the lead singer of the Black Skirts being an example, Clazzi going to college right up north would be another more recognizable example). They get the view of their country's music from an international stance. And yet they still go back and stick with the smaller market. To them it's more about grabbing hold of a smaller niche and gaining a more dedicated fanbase. Some music is simply not for modern consumption. They can adapt to that.

 

And of course there are always positives to a niche market (and a niche market within a niche market, well..). Elitism being lampooned as being a bad thing, can be a bad thing. The more largely populated, consumptuous, but fleeting fanbase who pick up on these new exotic fad, are simply that - fleeting. And while in the end they'll still accumulate the higher revenue, there's no consistency from person to person. The system is what's consistent, not the individuals. So in a sense these bands play it out smarter by sticking to a local consumer base, intentional or not.

 

Then there's cultural differences. Pop, in a lot of respects, is westernized. If I were to go outside right now and stand in the streets playing Mongolian-classical experimental ambient drone....exactly. But if I were to go out, churn out a KARA song, without the lyrics, and start dancing, it'd probably garner a more palpable response.

 

If people wish to simply indulge in the idea, and subculture of music, power to them. And that's really what's happen on many levels - fact is that not everyone really likes music. That's where the advance-ness has gone and went. They've created an industry that churns out another world unto itself and it's ingenious in many ways.

 

There also seems to be some sort of unspoken rule that everyone must enjoy music, and on a deeply psychological and primal level I'm sure they do. But there's really no reason why this should be true on a more shallow level.

Take this - I for one have absolutely no interest in car. No particular agenda, bias, just never had the opportunity to do so. But they fulfill my need for transportation, and I am content with that. A person can just as well feel the same with music. 

 

In short: I'm fine with people liking what they like, and if they happen to not like things I like. Let them eat cake.


Right, right, music - 

Agree'd this is really nice :D, loving it on my w1000xs too ^^. But alas darn it my RATIO my RATIO, it's about to die xD. 

post #1049 of 1602

Still catching up with this thread (read up to August 2011!) but wanted to acknowledge the extra effort they go to with packaging music in the East

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/steven2509/sets/72157634925747447/

post #1050 of 1602

That's some nice packageing! 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Music
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Asian music (Chinese, Japanese, Korean)