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Help me, for I have sinned! (Snapped a can off)

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I posted this in the headphone section, but was advised to try here.  

 

I have a pair of Ultrasone Pro 750s that I recently dismembered by accidentally snapping one of the cans off.  I'm wondering if anyone here can guide me through the best way to go about fixing them.  I have soldered before and have decent tech ability in general but am not entirely versed in wiring or audio areas.  What concerns me is that the cable going through the headband to the can actually has two wires, a red and a bronze separated by nylon, running through it.  Do I need to resolder the disconnected end from each to the other?  I'm concerned that the remaining wire coming off the can may not be long enough.  Would it be better for me to find a wire of this type and completely rewire the headphones?  If so my biggest concern is finding the right kind of wire.  Thanks in advance for any help.

 

IMG_20110630_182539.jpg

 

IMG_20110630_183242.jpg

post #2 of 14

It looks like the actual yokes (the half-circle things holding the pain cups to the headband) have broken as well. 

 

Im sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but if they are under warranty that's your best bet. 

If they are not under warranty, sell them for a few bucks as parts-headphones and move on. 

 

Maybe someone will need new driver(s) for their headphones, or wants to experiment... Fixing busted plastic parts is nearly impossible. 

post #3 of 14

You could try some epoxy to glue the plastic back together. I don't know if it will hold under the day to day stress that the headband assembly is under but it's worth a try. 

 

For the wires you will want to reconnect red to red and bronze to bronze. Type of wire is not critical if you completely replace the cable, you can probably find lots of good options in the DIY cable thread

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 

I actually wasn't too worried about the plastic work because I have some pretty good epoxy and the piece that allows the headphones to swivel is unharmed, so I thought it should bond fairly well.  I'll check the DIY cable thread for options, thanks.

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

Well im back resurrecting this ancient thread.. I've finally found time in the last month to repair these.  As I assumed the plastic part was no trouble at all, the can is reconnected and swivels just as the unharmed one.  My problem is I feel like there's quality loss going to the right can.  I just reconnected the split wires with some solder and other wire I had.  The signal gets there but it feels weak.  I think I need to completely rewire this can, but I can't find a length of this kind of wire at this gauge anywhere (it needs to fit through some small holes in the band).

 

Please does anyone have any idea where I might find a length of this wire capable of carrying this signal correctly?  Thanks.

post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 

Bump 1 time!

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

Going to resurrect this one last time.  I'm curious if anyone would be willing to take on this project for monetary compensation.  It requires new wire being soldered to the can and being ran through the headband.  I simply don't have the time and don't want to mess it up but I really miss these cans.

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Photonik View Post
 

Going to resurrect this one last time.  I'm curious if anyone would be willing to take on this project for monetary compensation.  It requires new wire being soldered to the can and being ran through the headband.  I simply don't have the time and don't want to mess it up but I really miss these cans.

 

It's probably impossible to reuse the old headband assembly. Measure the width of the yoke, then look for a cheap headphone of similar form factor and the same yoke width.

 

You'll have to look for a new cable running through the headband as well. I did something similar with a pair of Beats Executive not so long ago:

 

post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

It's possible in my case.  I've had it fixed with epoxy and soldering the wire from where it was disconnected but there's definitely quality loss.  That's why I'd like to just run an entire new wire through the headband.  Was hoping to find someone willing to take the project on, fix them and return them to me.  Would you happen to be interested?

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Photonik View Post
 

It's possible in my case.  I've had it fixed with epoxy and soldering the wire from where it was disconnected but there's definitely quality loss.  That's why I'd like to just run an entire new wire through the headband.  Was hoping to find someone willing to take the project on, fix them and return them to me.  Would you happen to be interested?

Judging from this picture:

 

 

It looks like the Pro 750s use pretty standard 2 core enameled wire. You can find it pretty much anywhere, most commonly in cheap earbuds. 

post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 

That's actually exactly what I used when fixing it but I couldn't find a length long enough to go all the way through the headband so I did a splice job that I'm pretty sure resulted in quality loss.

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Photonik View Post
 

That's actually exactly what I used when fixing it but I couldn't find a length long enough to go all the way through the headband so I did a splice job that I'm pretty sure resulted in quality loss.

Was it actual audible quality loss though, or was it a placebo effect? Solder joints typically don't interfere with audio quality.

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

Unfortunately it was definitely audible.  I was thinking it was because the wire I used to patch with didn't carry the signal as well.  You could flip the cans around or put them on blind and easily notice which was the one getting a weaker signal.

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Photonik View Post
 

Unfortunately it was definitely audible.  I was thinking it was because the wire I used to patch with didn't carry the signal as well.  You could flip the cans around or put them on blind and easily notice which was the one getting a weaker signal.

 

Sounds like one side has had its signal de-earthed or something.

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