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Lucky to be alive... Hope this helps someone. - Page 2

post #16 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Borgbox View Post

Thank you for posting this. I may show this to my girlfriend as she has chronic anxiety, panic attacks, and (since our apartment fire) PTSD. She and I both know the dangers involved in even the benign use of benzos and having a story of the dangers will help us keep the doses, and those dangers, in perspective. I'm sorry you had to go through such an ordeal and I wanted you to know that your story will help many people.

 

as an aside, the pharmaceutical industry is a legal drug racket to be wary of. Exercise, diet, and meditation are incredibly effective at relieving symptoms of anxiety... never rule them out of your day to day treatment.

 

It is funny you should mention to be wary of the pharmaceutical industry, and that your girlfriend has PTSD because this is a prime example of the dark nature of these companies:

 

MDMA has clinically shown to have a near 100% efficacy rate of CURING PTSD in one single clinical session, and is not any more neurotoxic than readily available medications and generally only needs 1 session... but why sell something that works the first time? The money is in the repeats, and the dependance.

 

Not a lot of scholarly articles on it, but there are at least 3 I know of and they were mind blowing. Basic concept is that MDMA is one of the only things that can quickly and safely cause behavior and fear extinction which is what CBT tries to do over long periods of time with less than stellar success rates. You should check it out.

 

I am short on time but here is one to look at http://www.maps.org/mdma/spain_MDMA_JOPD.pdf

 

However, the one I was referencing I will dig out for you and PM you should you desire.

 

post #17 of 82

Dam thats pretty dangerous. We never realize the side effects of a drug until we/another person go thru it. Im glad you are doing fine, take care of yourself. 


Edited by fabio-fi - 6/27/11 at 2:59pm
post #18 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by sokolov91 View Post


Great to hear you found support through a group. I never really had social anxiety though, just panic attacks but I can certainly appreciate your situation and how hard it is to deal with those feelings.

 


I never had social anxiety either.  Just general anxiety + panic disorder.  The lady that I ran into the other day that couldn't leave her home without her husband was agoraphobic.

 

 

 

 

post #19 of 82

Thanks very much for the link! I've heard rumors to the effect but I've yet to see peer-reviewed articles to back it up. I have heard the same for certain psychoactive substances such as the mystical DMT.

 

I trust many an effective treatment has been axed by pharmaceutical companies in lieu of more profitable measures and the bottomless pockets they have keep many other treatments on the black market.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sokolov91 View Post



 

It is funny you should mention to be wary of the pharmaceutical industry, and that your girlfriend has PTSD because this is a prime example of the dark nature of these companies:

 

MDMA has clinically shown to have a near 100% efficacy rate of CURING PTSD in one single clinical session, and is not any more neurotoxic than readily available medications and generally only needs 1 session... but why sell something that works the first time? The money is in the repeats, and the dependance.

 

Not a lot of scholarly articles on it, but there are at least 3 I know of and they were mind blowing. Basic concept is that MDMA is one of the only things that can quickly and safely cause behavior and fear extinction which is what CBT tries to do over long periods of time with less than stellar success rates. You should check it out.

 

I am short on time but here is one to look at http://www.maps.org/mdma/spain_MDMA_JOPD.pdf

 

However, the one I was referencing I will dig out for you and PM you should you desire.

 



 

post #20 of 82

Wow sokolov, I hope you're feeling better; I know I'm replying months later, but I just felt that I had too.

 

I just think we have too much in common XD

 

I'm 19, from Montreal, and have been struggling with medical procedures due to crohn's disease for a while O_o. Oh, and I'm an audiophile of course :P

 

Ain't that ironic or what?!

post #21 of 82

 

Wow.

 

OK I agree with you some of this stuff seems to be handed out like candy and that is less good.

 

Please don't say MDMA can cure PTSD with near 100% success rate that is just pure b/s imho ok, you can't give a Vietnam veteran MDMA and then all of a sudden all his mental horrors are gone ok.

 

If you search the internet I'm sure you'll find a paper supporting x drug in x way and people put their shades on and just read the papers they want to read to self-justify whatever it is they happen to like, and that is just idiotic.

 

post #22 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiteki View Post

 

Wow.

 

OK I agree with you some of this stuff seems to be handed out like candy and that is less good.

 

Please don't say MDMA can cure PTSD with near 100% success rate that is just pure b/s imho ok, you can't give a Vietnam veteran MDMA and then all of a sudden all his mental horrors are gone ok.

 

If you search the internet I'm sure you'll find a paper supporting x drug in x way and people put their shades on and just read the papers they want to read to self-justify whatever it is they happen to like, and that is just idiotic.

 


 

Yup. The ability for anyone to publish information to the Internet is a double edged sword. On the one hand, it allows new approaches and ideas to gain exposure that would have otherwise been stifled due to prevailing prejudices and academic climates. On the other hand finding clinical studies on the Internet often means next to nothing, sorry to say. If you have any knowledge of experimental design and efficacy, these "studies" tend to have more holes than swiss cheese. Finding something in a scholarly journal on the other hand is another matter, as they have high standards for publication. Standards are a good thing.


Edited by MuppetFace - 12/17/11 at 2:47am
post #23 of 82
i use to take medicine when i was little for my heart and stuff but i got tired of it. decided to push myself far beyond any human limitations and when i hit 18 and got final check-up i'm the most healthiest person in the world. no more meds. i haven't gotten sick for over 10 years. very adaptable in sub-zero temps running in nothing but t-shirt and shorts(i still wear hat and gloves cause my fingers and ears are only parts of my body still get cold) and very hot humid conditions. got tired of people telling me i couldn't do anything and would get no where when i was younger. now it's people coming to me for advice and they're catching colds,flus and everything left and right while i stay healthy. i don't diet. i eat what i want but more active then other people my age(that's the secret there. it's not what you eat really but on what you do).
post #24 of 82

 

Also thought I should add that I also agree psychoactive medication is becoming too much of a prevailing solution in mental healthcare. On the one hand, there are people who LEGITIMATELY NEED psychoactive medication. If you're psychotic and hear voices, see things that aren't there, talk to your dead grandpa... then you really can't "find the root of your problem and solve it." You need chemical intervention to maintain any sort of quality of life. Also some people can have anxiety so crippling they literally can't function without chemical help. In a lot of cases however medication is prescribed when it's not necessary, when the individual in question would be better off working through his or her problems and developing coping strategies. Psychoactive medication rarely if ever cures a disorder--- it merely manages it. I've been told by some clinicians that benzos are preferred as "temporary" solutions, since long term they're going to do more harm than help in a lot of cases. I mean, one has to look at the big picture. If all we were wanting to do was CURE depression, for instance, then no better solution would exist than prescribing opiates like morphine. But that's a poor solution in the long run, since the side effects (unavoidable mental and psychical dependance, respiratory depression, etc.) are going to be a bigger detriment than the benefits. The person's quality of life would be worse in the end, not better.

 

Unfortunately a lot of clinicians seem to want to just keep patients on them indefinitely. I suppose that's the difference between PSYCHIATRY and PSYCHOLOGY. Sadly these psychiatrists who keep patients on meds tend to not want to bother with psychologists and non-medicative therapeutic solutions in my experience, dismissing them as not sound science.

post #25 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post


I'll agree with the others about caffeine withdrawal.

i never experience that. but then again i don't drink sodas or coffee. i wake up fine and all i have in the mornings is big breakfast like pot of rice with some eggs and even meat(mmmmmm,bacon) and drink glass of milk. only caffine i get is from my pre-workout stuff i take before i hit the weights,but it's different type of caffine(like a more potent,longer lasting caffine. i forgot what it's called). i drink like 2 gallons of water a day as well to stay hydrated.
post #26 of 82

I wanted to add one more sentiment (I'd just edit my post above, but my browser and the forums don't get along):

 

Problems arise when doctors treat the symptoms and the disease, rather than the patient.

post #27 of 82

Medications sucks. I have to remember to take it and i usually forget to. Also i am pretty antisocial when on medication.

post #28 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post

Medications sucks. I have to remember to take it and i usually forget to. Also i am pretty antisocial when on medication.



And how would your life be without it? I mean, you're on it for a reason, right? Even though I'm on medication that has terrible side effects for my Crohn's disease (for instance, it can cause cancer), I'd hate to think of how poor my life would be without it. I'd probably be in the hospital every other month.

post #29 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post



And how would your life be without it? I mean, you're on it for a reason, right? Even though I'm on medication that has terrible side effects for my Crohn's disease (for instance, it can cause cancer), I'd hate to think of how poor my life would be without it. I'd probably be in the hospital every other month.



I haven't taken my meds for 2 days and i am fine. I honestly feel my meds are worthless. Why do i need medication because of a stupid disability i have doubts about. Stupid aspergers. Ah well not much i can do about it. I refuse to pay $60 a week for my meds so i am pretty much dropping them.

post #30 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post

I haven't taken my meds for 2 days and i am fine. I honestly feel my meds are worthless. Why do i need medication because of a stupid disability i have doubts about. Stupid aspergers. Ah well not much i can do about it. I refuse to pay $60 a week for my meds so i am pretty much dropping them.


If you're an adult then I see no reason why you can't decide whether to take your meds or not. So long as it's an informed decision. You should at least talk to your doctor about it first. Present your case for thinking you don't need them and see what he / she says. Ultimately it's your decision (if you're an adult), but it helps to get another opinion in case there are long-term effects you don't know about.

 

Better safe than sorry.

 

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