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Anyone young that have experience with custom IEM? - Page 2

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3602 View Post

Ah... Well, none of my local audiologists have experience molding ears for the specific purpose of getting custom IEMs so. None of them know that such a thing exists.

What I do know is that my grandfather needs to have his hearing-aids refit every two years.



All audiologist make molds for hearing aids, it's the same mold used for custom IEM's, maybe you should make yourself a bit clearer to the audiologist next time you tallk to them, ALL audiologists make ear molds, that's part of beign an audiologist.

 

post #17 of 29
I'd also recommend you read up on the thread debating whether or not customs are worth their weight, because they have surpassed the point of diminishing returns IMO. Instead of dishing out close to $1k on impressions and the actual monitors, use the money towards something else. Because you will most likely get around 50% (if not less) back if you decide to resell them.
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cybertec69 View Post


All audiologist make molds for hearing aids, it's the same mold used for custom IEM's, maybe you should make yourself a bit clearer to the audiologist next time you tallk to them, ALL audiologists make ear molds, that's part of beign an audiologist.


Please, I have specified "for the specific purpose of getting custom IEMs". Whatever custom hearing aids I have ever seen do not have the prominent sound-tube as custom IEMs do. Do they take molds? Yes, that at $150 a pair. When I mention "custom IEMs" or "écouteurs intra-auriculaires sur mesure" if you will, they do not know what that is. None of them have taken molds "two to three millimeters pass the second curve" or something similar. Quebec is not a hifi-centric city. If you want to play the blame game then it is actually my fault.

post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by average_joe View Post



 

Thanks for your open minded and great post (as well as your other posts).  As you know, head-fi is not short on difference of opinion, and I too feel the same about reading your posts.  Many people feel the need to fight for their equipment; I am fortunate to own a lot of great gear and have found my hierarchy as have you!  I am actually thinking of selling my LCD-2 and getting a HD800 to see how that competes against my current top 3 custom IEMs.

 

And as far as loud listening, I completely agree, hearing is a gift that many young people are abusing these days.  However, since I have climbed up the quality ladder I find it easier to listen at quieter volumes due to the enhanced clarity of the presentation, hopefully others will also.

 


You are very kind to make such comments and I thank you.  If you care to see an interesting series of exchanges, take a look at a thread called "does anyone still love their PS1000".  I won't say anything else about it.  However, if you would care to share your thoughts with me after reading the posts, I'd be very glad to benefit from your opinion.  

 

I enjoy trying to help these young people learn to appreciate the gift of music (I'm not really sure that these very eloquent young people need any help from me on that point) and to protect their ability to enjoy it, as many young people don't appreciate what this new technology can do to their hearing until it's too late.

 

Regarding the LCD2 and HD800, I own them both.  I like them both but I don't think you'll gain much from the switch from the LCD2 to the HD800.  The HD800 is very bass heavy (as the LCD2 can also be) but not in the same way as the LCD2.  Without going into detail because it's all a matter of opinion, I enjoy both units immensely but reach for the LCD2 more than the HD800.  If comparisons with the IEMs are what you're looking for, before shelling out the many hundreds more the HD800 costs versus what you're going to get on an LCD2 sale, please permit me to suggest trying the HD800 at a meet or audio store.  Once you take the loss on the LCD2, you'll miss that unit and won't get your money back.  However, if you decide to go that route, the HD800 is also wonderful so it's only money that you really stand to lose.

 

post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cybertec69 View Post





All audiologist make molds for hearing aids, it's the same mold used for custom IEM's, maybe you should make yourself a bit clearer to the audiologist next time you tallk to them, ALL audiologists make ear molds, that's part of beign an audiologist.

 

 

All things being equal (are they ever?) I would still choose to use an audiologist recommended by the company whose custom IEM I was purchasing.  Even if all audiologists know how to make an IEM mold by virtue of knowing generally how to make ear canal molds, in case the fit wasn't right, I'd want to be able to argue to the IEM company that I used the audiologist they recommended, rather than someone else.  If I used my own audiologist and the fit wasn't right, the IEM manufacturer might well say "too bad" because I didn't use an audiologist they recommended.  If I use one they recommend, what's their defense going to be in that case?  I think I'm in a better position using their recommended audiologists for that reason.
 

 

post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyberspyder View Post

I'd also recommend you read up on the thread debating whether or not customs are worth their weight, because they have surpassed the point of diminishing returns IMO. Instead of dishing out close to $1k on impressions and the actual monitors, use the money towards something else. Because you will most likely get around 50% (if not less) back if you decide to resell them.


This is a very interesting point.  I also own a Shure SE535, considered one of the best off-the-shelf IEMs.  They costs less than 1/2 my JH-16 Pro.  Are they worth it?  I don't really know for sure. The SE535 is so good that I think they are, at the very least, 90-95% as good as my 16.  That's just one person's opinion but it's as valid as anybody else's, I think.  So why did I get the 16 (I purchased it after the 535)?  I got the custom mold because I couldn't wear the 535 for any length of time without discomfort.  Somewhere else in this thread, I think I mentioned that my ear canals are different and kind of "funny".  My left canal is virtually straight while my right canal takes a sharp upward turn.  So the 535 kept falling out of my left ear, no matter which molds I used and the right ear stayed in but started bothering me after a while.  The 535 just wasn't comfortable for me.  So, if you agree with the assessment that the best off-the-shelf models are just about as good as the best custom IEMs (and I come close to agreeing with this point of view - maybe not all the way but close), then the extra money is worth it only if, like me, you experienced physical issues or discomfort with off-the-shelf models.  Keep in mind the differences in cost are not small.  As the poster stated, you can easily double (or more) your costs going with the custom IEM.

 

post #22 of 29

Customs are expensive but i think they are worth it. I'm 17 and i have had my customs for about 2 years now. Yes i admit my ears have grown a bit, but with advice from my friend, i added a fine layer of clear nail polish to increase the size of the customs. Now they feel just as good as 2 years ago. hopefully they will last me another 2+ years since i am practically done my Growth spurt of youths

post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by planx View Post

Customs are expensive but i think they are worth it. I'm 17 and i have had my customs for about 2 years now. Yes i admit my ears have grown a bit, but with advice from my friend, i added a fine layer of clear nail polish to increase the size of the customs. Now they feel just as good as 2 years ago. hopefully they will last me another 2+ years since i am practically done my Growth spurt of youths


You have an interesting solution to the "growth" issue. Has the nail polish caused any irritation to the skin?
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ricmiclaw View Post



You have an interesting solution to the "growth" issue. Has the nail polish caused any irritation to the skin?


None at the moment! I have been using it for about a month now and none! Only problems are the smell and accuracy. Its hard estimating how much to put on so put on less than you think you should and be sure to try multiple times before re-applying

post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by planx View Post





None at the moment! I have been using it for about a month now and none! Only problems are the smell and accuracy. Its hard estimating how much to put on so put on less than you think you should and be sure to try multiple times before re-applying


Well, I think your solution is very clever. Be careful about the interaction of the chemicals in the nail polish and the polymer used to make the molds. Some of the chemicals used in nail polish can soften or melt certain plastics. If you haven't experienced this, you probably don't have an issue but be especially mindful if you change the nail polish brand or if the brand you're using changes it's ingredients. Have fun!
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ricmiclaw View Post



Well, I think your solution is very clever. Be careful about the interaction of the chemicals in the nail polish and the polymer used to make the molds. Some of the chemicals used in nail polish can soften or melt certain plastics. If you haven't experienced this, you probably don't have an issue but be especially mindful if you change the nail polish brand or if the brand you're using changes it's ingredients. Have fun!


Thanks! I was worried about that but i did some High School Chemistry and found out there wasn't going to be any reactions of some sort. Chances are, i'm not going to be changing any nail polish brands anytime soon. Only minus i see with using nail polish is it makes the customs rather uglier. instead of the smooth, flawless surface you usually get in UM products, its more rough and bumpy. Might have something to do with my accuracy... As long as the fit is good, i'm happy

post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by planx View Post





Thanks! I was worried about that but i did some High School Chemistry and found out there wasn't going to be any reactions of some sort. Chances are, i'm not going to be changing any nail polish brands anytime soon. Only minus i see with using nail polish is it makes the customs rather uglier. instead of the smooth, flawless surface you usually get in UM products, its more rough and bumpy. Might have something to do with my accuracy... As long as the fit is good, i'm happy


That's all that counts.
post #28 of 29

Heres my take on customs for young people. If you already passed puberty(usually <15) you most probably wont have any fit issues outgrowing your customs in short term. I did ask a audiologist when i did mine, and she simply said that the ear will constantly change as you age, just not as extreme as the change during puberty. So, for a typical teenager at lets say 18 years old, a normal custom should be able to hold the fit for a couple of years(4-5) before it becomes loose. Of course there are still factors contributing to the situation like weather,lifestyle and metabolism but those are negligible for the most part. I also discover that once u start wearing customs, you ear will grow larger. Take it like you are wearing a new jeans. After some time wearing it becomes wider and wider. The same can be told for the customs, just that for the most part its your ear growing bigger and bigger.

post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by poliact View Post

Heres my take on customs for young people. If you already passed puberty(usually <15) you most probably wont have any fit issues outgrowing your customs in short term. I did ask a audiologist when i did mine, and she simply said that the ear will constantly change as you age, just not as extreme as the change during puberty. So, for a typical teenager at lets say 18 years old, a normal custom should be able to hold the fit for a couple of years(4-5) before it becomes loose. Of course there are still factors contributing to the situation like weather,lifestyle and metabolism but those are negligible for the most part. I also discover that once u start wearing customs, you ear will grow larger. Take it like you are wearing a new jeans. After some time wearing it becomes wider and wider. The same can be told for the customs, just that for the most part its your ear growing bigger and bigger.



Also you forgot to mention, your ears will not only grow bigger but will be happier. wink.gif

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