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I truly believe these are one of the best Classical Music headphones I've ever heard - Page 17

post #241 of 249

Just recently repurchased my DT 660s. Here is to hoping they don't break again.

post #242 of 249

I've seen the DT860 go for under £50 used, decent condition. Are they similar to the DT660 except open?

post #243 of 249

guys, do you think that dt860 is actually a perfect refinement of dt660?

i heard that it is even better than dt660...

post #244 of 249

Here's a review on the both of them from another forum in 2004. Looks like DT860 is a bit better:

 

DT660 (close-back design)
Circumaural cans are generally more comfortable and duly so with both DT660/860 but material of black pads are not as lush and smooth as those silver ones on DT770-990 series. If this matters to you, I believe the pads are interchangeable.

DT660 offers good isolation as close-design should and the first noticeable aural aspect which is very different from most Beyer cans is the mid range. Vocals are very full, forward and lush. Those who complains about recessed mids should look here. In fact, it reminds me of Senn HD600 (jaded memory though). So involving is this characteristic that I just kept inserting different discs with vocals and listen intently, totally disregarding the rest of the aural spectrum. Until such a time I reached satisfaction, I began to ponder those who are used to DT880/990 will deem it as bright sounding. I disagree however.

Next under the microscope is bass quality for quantity is never an issue with close-back design. Do we have the overpowering (to me, that is) sort exhibited by DT770 or the deep and tight nature that of DT150 (my favourite monitor cans)? I'm glad to say DT660 is in the middle of the road. I always felt claustrophobic with DT770 owing to the overwhelming boom in my head but never so with DT660. It may not have the bass quality of DT150 but in no way is it bass shy or inferior. In fact, it sounds very similar to DT831 but a few rungs higher in bounce and punch. There's a flaw (in my opinion) and that is extension when compared to DT880 for I often felt air movement but unable to hear anything on very low bass notes eg. organ rolls.

Finally, the highs are sweeter that DT150 and simply brush DT770 aside. It may not have the extension to that of DT880/990 but in some ways, upper mid range to treble is quite similar to DT831. Once again, some will say treble brightness is evident but I feel differently albeit sensitive to bright sound. I reckon the main difference is the full bodied mids that changed the equation of similarity between DT660 and DT831.

Referring to my claustophobic experience with DT770, DT660 never exhibited this trait and in fact, it never sent out a constant reminder I was listening to close-back cans except for the increased isolation. Soundstaging wise, I didn't expect it to pan wide and duly so but to a degree that is not worth quibbling. However, I was astonished by the projection of soundstaging depth. So much so I have to remove the cans and peer for any angling of the drivers to create such an effect. It's almost akin to listening with some amount of crossfeed.

DT860 (open-back design)
There's is a slight loss of bass thickness and volume with this pair but in return, I heard much better bass definition and extension over DT660. Although the end result is still nowhere near to DT150 (definition) and DT880 (extension), proximity to these benchmarks is significantly reduced. Nonetheless, the same bouncy bass of DT660 is still evident and adds up to a more enjoyable bass performance over DT831/931. 

What is deemed neutral on DT150 and recessed on DT880 is full bodied, up close and personal where mid range is concerned on DT860. I'm convinced Beyer is trying to achieve a different sound with the new Premium Line and targets the mid range which is constantly being challenged by Sennheiser and AKG. It's so different compared to all the Beyer cans in my arsenal that I'm most captivated by this sonic trait. After successfully tearing myself away from this "light", I travelled to the other end of the tunnel where the upper-mid to treble range resides.

DT860 betters its closed counterpart for the same improvement in definition and extension in the lows is also evident in the highs. As a result, airiness is significantly greater than DT660 and possibly the same as DT931. The latter excels in piano presentation and I observed the same prowess but with more articulation and ambience surrounding each note when the ivory key strikes while cymbals sheen is more sparkling. Now I understand why DT860 costs a premium price over DT660. 

In which case, I expected wider soundstaging from open-back DT860 but I was surprised it isn't so. It's slightly wider than DT660 but never what I've experienced with DT880/990 when the width can span more than 180 degrees. I felt that soundstaging width of DT860 is about 140 degrees and before you jeer, focus on the amazing depth it projects. So deep it sounds to me that once again, I thought there's a crossfeed circuitry in the link. Play "Buena Vista Social Club" and you can share the same perception as I did. Hey, some may say there's contradiction when I mentioned vocals are forward but soundstaging depth is deep. Allow me to explain myself, on most well recorded cds with jazz vocals I've tried, the voices are very close and involving; almost smelling the singer's breath. At the same time, layering behind the singer where the musicians play on their respective instruments are easily pin pointed and differentiated in 3D depth. If I have to peg the forte of DT660/860 in a nutshell, I would pick mid range and soundstaging depth.

 

http://www.sgheadphones.net/index.php?showtopic=2147

post #245 of 249


Yeah, but see, I bought 660's because they are closed.

post #246 of 249
I tried the 660 a few times at an old hifi spot in Boston. Almost bought it on the spot. Great balance, I love my 770s but if I ever wanted a more neutral closed can, I'd buy the DT660 without thinking. It's what the senn HD280 wishes it was.
post #247 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilly87 View Post

I tried the 660 a few times at an old hifi spot in Boston. Almost bought it on the spot. Great balance, I love my 770s but if I ever wanted a more neutral closed can, I'd buy the DT660 without thinking. It's what the senn HD280 wishes it was.

 

Do you think the 660 would be better (or even or worse) for classical than the T90? 

post #248 of 249
If these headphones are exceptionally good for classical music, can we also say the same to its brother dt860? Are they EXCEPTIONALLY good too?
If not why? After reading reviews i didnt read any major differences( only that it has more bass)
If yes, why no one who is writing online is fan of this headphones while big crowd adores dt660?
Any suggestions?
I dont have answers to these questions smily_headphones1.gif)
post #249 of 249

Me neither. If someone drops a pile of money on my head, I'll buy the DT 440 and DT 860 and do a review of all three comparing them.

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