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Can I get better than 320kbps sound quality? - Page 5

post #61 of 134

That's a nice way of putting it. 

post #62 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradhyper View Post

Quote:



I just delete the files (so they are essentially 0kbps) and re-rip them about a dozen times. The CD needs some burn in time before it rips properly.



Just use EAC paranoid mode twice and it'll be ok.

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

The difference between high bitrate lossy and lossless is more a matter of what you believe than what you can actually hear.

I like how people believe the difference is greater with the type of music they personally listen to than the types they don't.


it is noticeable especially in the 20-22khz department and busy music

 

post #63 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunBakedEmoKid View Post





Just use EAC paranoid mode twice and it'll be ok.

 


 


it is noticeable especially in the 20-22khz department and busy music

 



people generally can't hear those frequencies.

post #64 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post

people generally can't hear those frequencies.


I thought people can't hear those frequencies at all.

post #65 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric_C View Post




I thought people can't hear those frequencies at all.


ya well some people with superhuman hearing might. like blind people.

 

post #66 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post

ya well some people with superhuman hearing might. like blind people.

Don't say that or the nut job audiophool folks will start poking out their peepers to improve their hearing!
post #67 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric_C View Post


I thought people can't hear those frequencies at all.

It isnt necessarily heard but effects the music as a whole making treble crisper. Human hearing range is generally between 20-20k hz. I personally can hear up to about 20khz
 

 

post #68 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunBakedEmoKid View Post



It isnt necessarily heard but effects the music as a whole making treble crisper. Human hearing range is generally between 20-20k hz. I personally can hear up to about 20khz
 

 


ya well most people me included can't make it past 18khz

 

post #69 of 134

If you can't hear those frequencies, I fail to see how you can notice the difference in that region. 

Note that I'm not saying the data in that >20KHz region has no effect on the audible region--it might, and though I don't know for sure, I accept the possibility exists--but let's not kid ourselves by discounting placebo effect being at play.

post #70 of 134

Now we are getting off topic...

 

Simpily Can I get better than 320kbps sound quality? Yes you can

post #71 of 134

It's more about the way the music was actually recorded in the study. If it was recorded properly, even low bitrates can sound very good. It also depends on the type of music you listen to.

 

I'd say as long as your stuff is for the most part in 160/256/320, it'll sound almost all the same. 128 sounds like garbage to me, though if I didn't have anything to compare it to, I don't think I would be complaining.

 

Lossless is cool and since you can get a 1TB for like $50 now, you can probably rip your entire library in lossless at a very cheap price.

 

I guess if you lose a CD or break it somehow, a lossless copy would be nice, since you retain everything.

 

 

post #72 of 134

*buzzer sound effect*

Hold on there! That's oversimplifying the problem and the solution. 

 

OP's first post actually posed the question: Will I be able to tell that FLAC is better than 320? This naturally begs questions of one's ability to hear format/bitrate-inherent differences--and if there are any--and whether his equipment will reveal these differences--again, if there are any.

post #73 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunBakedEmoKid View Post

It isnt necessarily heard but effects the music as a whole making treble crisper. Human hearing range is generally between 20-20k hz. I personally can hear up to about 20khz

No offense, but if you are talking about hearing 20kHz in music, you're blowing smoke. 20kHz is right at the edge of hearing. It isn't the frequency where treble occurs. It's a full octave above that. The only thing in music that exists up that high is upper level harmonics at a very low volume and the occasional stronger harmonic from a cymbal crash. The odds are, if you have absolutely perfect hearing, you would be able to perceive sound pressure with a 20kHz test tone cranked up to the threshold of pain. But if you did a direct comparison between music with 20Hz to 20 kHz and the same music with 20Hz to 18kHz, you wouldn't be able to perceive a difference. The reason has less to do with your ability to hear and more to do with the fact that there is very little sound up in that frequency range in music.

The fundamental frequencies in music are almost all in the range of 40Hz to 10kHz. There is an extra octave on the top to allow for harmonics, but it is not really needed above 15kHz because musical instruments don't go that high. Commercially recorded music isn't mixed to go that high. If there is anything up there at all it is most likely noise.

Don't believe me? Open your favorite music track in a sound editing program and set up a high pass filter at 18kHz. Listen to the sounds of silence.
Edited by bigshot - 6/22/11 at 9:21pm
post #74 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by SunBakedEmoKid View Post

It isnt necessarily heard but effects the music as a whole making treble crisper. Human hearing range is generally between 20-20k hz. I personally can hear up to about 20khz



No offense, but if you are talking about hearing 20kHz in music, you're blowing smoke. 20kHz is right at the edge of hearing. It isn't the frequency where treble occurs. It's a full octave above that. The only thing in music that exists up that high is upper level harmonics at a very low volume and the occasional stronger harmonic from a cymbal crash. The odds are, if you have absolutely perfect hearing, you would be able to perceive sound pressure with a 20kHz test tone cranked up to the threshold of pain. But if you did a direct comparison between music with 20Hz to 20 kHz and the same music with 20Hz to 18kHz, you wouldn't be able to perceive a difference. The reason has less to do with your ability to hear and more to do with the fact that there is very little sound up in that frequency range in music.

The fundamental frequencies in music are almost all in the range of 40Hz to 10kHz. There is an extra octave on the top to allow for harmonics, but it is rarely needed above 15kHz.


hence why i prefer 320kbps mp3s.

 

post #75 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post

hence why i prefer 320kbps mp3s.

People talk about "listening fatigue". The best way to induce listening fatigue is to wear sealed headphones and listen to tracks with boosted ultra high frequencies. It won't sound any different than a balanced frequency response, but you'll get a headache quick.

When I was a kid, I hated to go to Sears because the whole store was lit by banks of fluorescent lights as far as the eye could see. I could barely hear the squeal of all of those ballasts, but I sure could feel them in my head! That squeal is somewhere around 14-15kHz. Pain!
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