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do iem,s burn in? - Page 6

post #76 of 88

If you give a person who is allergic to roses, a plastic rose, they will get the same allergic reaction that a real rose would cause. Maybe burn ins are a mental thing, if it sounds better to you whats the harm.

post #77 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyworld View Post

If you give a person who is allergic to roses, a plastic rose, they will get the same allergic reaction that a real rose would cause. Maybe burn ins are a mental thing, if it sounds better to you whats the harm.


 

that's what you would call a "Placebo Effect"

 

Anyway, to answer the OP's post... IMO, Burn-In, along with other very sensitive topics like "God Exists" and Einstein's e=mc2 theory, is very hard to proof/disproof...

 

Everyone has a different opinion on almost everythng.... me myself, I believe in Burn-In, simply because I have experienced, or "feel" it some would say...

 

Many highly regarded HeadFi-ers here usually burn-in their phones before the review, typically 48-100 hours...

And some Manufacturer's actually advice you to burn-in your phones....

 

Again, all depends on the person you're asking

 

I think the best advice I can give to you now is to test this theory yourself...


Edited by Xinn3r - 3/15/12 at 8:22am
post #78 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyworld View Post

If you give a person who is allergic to roses, a plastic rose, they will get the same allergic reaction that a real rose would cause. Maybe burn ins are a mental thing, if it sounds better to you whats the harm.


I should try that. Sounds interesting.

 

post #79 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyworld View Post

If you give a person who is allergic to roses, a plastic rose, they will get the same allergic reaction that a real rose would cause. Maybe burn ins are a mental thing, if it sounds better to you whats the harm.



Or they won't have a reaction because they aren't allergic to plastic.  You are testing a placebo effect.  You can't assume they will get the same allergic reaction.  Now, even if they do (due to a mental disease), you proved the placebo can set them off.  You didn't prove the actual thing won't.  An anxiety attack can cause many things my friend...


Edited by tinyman392 - 3/15/12 at 9:17am
post #80 of 88

I don't have much hope in my tf10's sounding any better with burn in. Using my galaxy s due to impedance, the tf10's are not really listenable without eq. Using the cmoybb amp they are listenable without eq but again eq = big improvement.

post #81 of 88

Violins also have a burn-in phenomenon.

After some years of playing, new violins generally become better.


Edited by john65537 - 3/22/12 at 6:34pm
post #82 of 88

I'm not going to wonder into the discussion of burn in.

I do believe my headphones / IEMs sound sound better after a week of solid use.

I found this earlier, a complete ready to use player of burn in samples... it's really easy to use.

JLab Audio - Earphones, Headphones, Earbuds, USB Laptop Speakers, Cases & Accessories

post #83 of 88

Just ordered my IE80s. They'll be my first pair of decent IEMs and I can't wait to get them.

One thing I never really understood about burning in though, should I burn them in before listening to them for the first time? I CANT DO THAT! I'll be too excited!

post #84 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiisp View Post

Just ordered my IE80s. They'll be my first pair of decent IEMs and I can't wait to get them.

One thing I never really understood about burning in though, should I burn them in before listening to them for the first time? I CANT DO THAT! I'll be too excited!

 

If you want to play this burn-in game, you should listen to a specific song over and over a few times. Then burn them in on pink noise for 50 hours and see if the sound changed. My personal experience is that burn-in does change some of my headphones, and does nothing to others. My JVC S400 on-ears sounded very messy and extremely dark so I stopped listening to them for 50+ hours, burning them in on pink noise. They sound much tighter now and have opened up some (though they are still dark). My Yamaha EPH-100's have sounded perfect since I first put them in and after over 100 hours have not changed. Also the RE-262s did not change in any significant way to burn-in, but my RE0's did have some nice treble smoothing after burn-in. My experience says it helps sometimes and should not be discounted as if its the Flying Spaghetti Monster. Though I would only do it if there was something seriously lacking in the sound (ie: bloated bass, sibilance) to give the headphone another shot before it goes back to the manufacturer for a refund.

post #85 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhima View Post

 

If you want to play this burn-in game, you should listen to a specific song over and over a few times. Then burn them in on pink noise for 50 hours and see if the sound changed. My personal experience is that burn-in does change some of my headphones, and does nothing to others. My JVC S400 on-ears sounded very messy and extremely dark so I stopped listening to them for 50+ hours, burning them in on pink noise. They sound much tighter now and have opened up some (though they are still dark). My Yamaha EPH-100's have sounded perfect since I first put them in and after over 100 hours have not changed. Also the RE-262s did not change in any significant way to burn-in, but my RE0's did have some nice treble smoothing after burn-in. My experience says it helps sometimes and should not be discounted as if its the Flying Spaghetti Monster. Though I would only do it if there was something seriously lacking in the sound (ie: bloated bass, sibilance) to give the headphone another shot before it goes back to the manufacturer for a refund.

 

I actually compare with another IEM that has burned in (few hundred hours already) and listen for changes that way.  It's easier to spot and doesn't go entirely off of memory since one of the IEMs is more or less a constant.  With that said, I've heard some sort of break in with the majority of my IEMs, whether it be a BA or dynamic or even headphones.  What breaks in?  Well we don't know.  Could be the tips, could be driver, or it could be some other thing.  

post #86 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

 

I actually compare with another IEM that has burned in (few hundred hours already) and listen for changes that way.  It's easier to spot and doesn't go entirely off of memory since one of the IEMs is more or less a constant.  With that said, I've heard some sort of break in with the majority of my IEMs, whether it be a BA or dynamic or even headphones.  What breaks in?  Well we don't know.  Could be the tips, could be driver, or it could be some other thing.  

 

Yeah I could see that being a better way since you'll most likely forget how the IEM sounded 50 hours ago UNLESS you were able to pinpoint the problem to begin with and the burn-in actually remedied it (sibilance is the easiest one to notice a change if there is one).

post #87 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhima View Post

 

Yeah I could see that being a better way since you'll most likely forget how the IEM sounded 50 hours ago UNLESS you were able to pinpoint the problem to begin with and the burn-in actually remedied it (sibilance is the easiest one to notice a change if there is one).

You're right about that, the only other headphones I own are DT 990 pros and when I first got them I noticed that the highs were really harsh, after ~100 hours of burn in I noticed that it's gone - I kinda miss that now.

I guess I'll enjoy my IEMs out the box and for a couple weeks when I'm not listening I'll make sure they're burning in.

post #88 of 88

For my experience I do believe in burn-in but the changes will not be a lot, and I do believe your ears also need sometime to get use to a new headphone or iem sound

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