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Recommend me a car - Page 3

post #31 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by burk992 View Post

OP, I'm not quite sure how old you are or what your budget is, but time and time again I've seen bulletproof choices in fourth to fifth generation Honda Accords (that would be, 1990-97 model years) or pretty much and turbo diesel Volkswagon you can find for cheap. The older the better, as far as insurance and personal property taxes go, of course. 

 

And I suppose, I'll add to the Scoobaru pile, just because you'll pick up so many chicks driving an Impreza... no, I'm kidding. Get an Outback wagon, be the friend that gets 25 mpg+ and can carry the whole pack around town on Friday night. Nobody cares what you're driving as long as you keep it clean, make sure the interior smells relatively nice, and won't strand everyone out on the highway in the middle of the night.

 

(Then again, disregard everything I've said - I drive a '65 Chevelle Malibu.)


15 going on 16 in April, my budget is less than $7000. For insurance purposes it cant be older than 2003, so for Michigan weather (snow, etc) it needs to be AWD or FWD. Im taking in all considerations
 

 

post #32 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by lbj View Post

My first car was a Honda (a 96 Civic).  Drove that for 6 years until I bought the WRX in 2002.  Both were/are reliable cars, though I had to replace the clutch once in the Civic.  The Civic aged less gracefully than the Subaru - I experienced more creaks and rattles in that car, and the trim and plastic pieces wore out faster.  Aside from a couple of minor recalls, WRX has been bullet-proof.



To offer a different perspective, we have owned a '96, '97, and currently have a '98 Civic, all of which are the same model. All three were great to us (the first two were totaled by idiots, hence why we only have one), and the clutches will easily last 150k or beyond, that is, if you can put up with it slipping a little bit. A replacement clutch and flywheel only cost us $250 on the '97 when we did that, and like $200 in labor. Compared to other cars, that's very cheap. The current '98, we've put 70k miles on it, it's at 200k right now and still drives like it's brand new, and none of the plastic paneling has worn out, nothing rattles to this day and it drives much more quietly than other compact cars of that era. The only thing is that right around the 10-11 year mark both the '97 and the '98 had their original mufflers rust out, other than that the only thing we've done is change the oil and replace a slowly leaking radiator on the '98 a couple years ago.

 

The newer Hondas don't have very impressive gas mileage from what I hear, but mine will get upwards of 40 MPG if I'm taking a road trip on the highway, and it's never below 35 around town, even under the worst stop-and-go traffic conditions with the air conditioning blasting. Considering you could buy a slightly newer Honda than mine and still spend less than $5k, it's an excellent value in terms of the money you'll spend on it.

 

I think between Honda, Toyota, and Subaru, you really can't go wrong...those three brands have proven reliability for decades now. You'll probably want to avoid most of the European cars. BMW's and Mercedes are expensive and have rear wheel drive, and VW has a bad track record with electronic components in their cars (I am echoing VW owners' opinions on this, not generating my own opinion).


Edited by MD1032 - 6/23/11 at 5:41pm
post #33 of 77

1999 Honda Civic Si Coupe. You can get one for around $5000.

htup-0803-07-z-2b1999-honda-civic-si-coupe-2bjdm-mugen-rear-wing.jpg


Edited by TheLaw - 6/23/11 at 6:20pm
post #34 of 77

2003 Volkswagon Golf GTi. Yours for around $7000.

 

2002.volkswagen.gti.10737-E.jpg


Edited by TheLaw - 6/23/11 at 6:24pm
post #35 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by cifani090 View Post

15 going on 16 in April, my budget is less than $7000. For insurance purposes it cant be older than 2003, so for Michigan weather (snow, etc) it needs to be AWD or FWD. Im taking in all considerations
 

 


HHHNNNNNNNNG seven grand?! Jesus Christ!

 

post #36 of 77

Is this car going to be part of the raffle? blink.gif

post #37 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MD1032 View Post





To offer a different perspective, we have owned a '96, '97, and currently have a '98 Civic, all of which are the same model. All three were great to us (the first two were totaled by idiots, hence why we only have one), and the clutches will easily last 150k or beyond, that is, if you can put up with it slipping a little bit. A replacement clutch and flywheel only cost us $250 on the '97 when we did that, and like $200 in labor. Compared to other cars, that's very cheap. The current '98, we've put 70k miles on it, it's at 200k right now and still drives like it's brand new, and none of the plastic paneling has worn out, nothing rattles to this day and it drives much more quietly than other compact cars of that era. The only thing is that right around the 10-11 year mark both the '97 and the '98 had their original mufflers rust out, other than that the only thing we've done is change the oil and replace a slowly leaking radiator on the '98 a couple years ago.

 

The newer Hondas don't have very impressive gas mileage from what I hear, but mine will get upwards of 40 MPG if I'm taking a road trip on the highway, and it's never below 35 around town, even under the worst stop-and-go traffic conditions with the air conditioning blasting. Considering you could buy a slightly newer Honda than mine and still spend less than $5k, it's an excellent value in terms of the money you'll spend on it.

 

I think between Honda, Toyota, and Subaru, you really can't go wrong...those three brands have proven reliability for decades now. You'll probably want to avoid most of the European cars. BMW's and Mercedes are expensive and have rear wheel drive, and VW has a bad track record with electronic components in their cars (I am echoing VW owners' opinions on this, not generating my own opinion).


Really? I was liking the VW Jetta, if i could only find one with heated leather seats. Those seem to be the hardest to find.
 

 

post #38 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesMcProgger View Post

Is this car going to be part of the raffle? blink.gif



I hope so... my ugo won't last much longer, wheels, transmission, everything breaking down, cept the chassis, fyi...t34/t72 tank chassis are damn durable, last time i was driving it through the sahara, i got shot at so many times, they brought out flak guns from wwII and crap, but it bounced off it like it was butter on mashed perderders. finally, i had to stop when the liter large fuel tank ran outta gas, send me a PM if a new raffles coming up

 

jimjambonks321@gmail.com if you need it  

post #39 of 77

Si doesn't sound like the best idea in snowy weather ;)

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLaw View Post

1999 Honda Civic Si Coupe. You can get one for around $5000.

htup-0803-07-z-2b1999-honda-civic-si-coupe-2bjdm-mugen-rear-wing.jpg


 

My friend's got an 03 WRX STi that he built from the ground up, ran him alot more than 7K, but he loves it. He races, kills everyone at the track.

 

Newer Hyundai Sonatas might be a good option. Their resale is terrible, which I guess is an advantage for me (plus they've got a nice warranty)...Mustangs are nice too.

 

post #40 of 77
The Si would be OK. It's FWD and if you have a stick, it'll go through bad weather. The problem is finding one that hasn't been thrashed and insurance costs would be vicious for a 16 year old.

I would not buy a Mustang. They're RWD and will swap ends when it's slippery.

Speaking of handling danger, you ought to sign up for a MSF course, cifani. I can't recommend a motorcycle to a 16 year old (wait until you're 25 or so), but MSF does a great job of preparing you for road hazards and highly defensive driving. Plus the riding course is super fun and you'll love every minute. I'm giving my 16 year old a MSF course gift certificate for his birthday in September and a biker jacket. Take the course. And get a jacket, they're cool.

But about cars, I'd look for something like a Civic, Corolla, Accord, Sentra, etc. with a stick. The insurance won't be ridiculous, they're reliable, and you can always get another car later. Or a motorcycle. smily_headphones1.gif
post #41 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by buffalowings View Post





I hope so... my ugo won't last much longer, wheels, transmission, everything breaking down, cept the chassis, fyi...t34/t72 tank chassis are damn durable, last time i was driving it through the sahara, i got shot at so many times, they brought out flak guns from wwII and crap, but it bounced off it like it was butter on mashed perderders. finally, i had to stop when the liter large fuel tank ran outta gas, send me a PM if a new raffles coming up

 

jimjambonks321@gmail.com if you need it  

okay, i admit, I laughed.
 

 

post #42 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

The Si would be OK. It's FWD and if you have a stick, it'll go through bad weather. The problem is finding one that hasn't been thrashed and insurance costs would be vicious for a 16 year old.

I would not buy a Mustang. They're RWD and will swap ends when it's slippery.

Speaking of handling danger, you ought to sign up for a MSF course, cifani. I can't recommend a motorcycle to a 16 year old (wait until you're 25 or so), but MSF does a great job of preparing you for road hazards and highly defensive driving. Plus the riding course is super fun and you'll love every minute. I'm giving my 16 year old a MSF course gift certificate for his birthday in September and a biker jacket. Take the course. And get a jacket, they're cool.

But about cars, I'd look for something like a Civic, Corolla, Accord, Sentra, etc. with a stick. The insurance won't be ridiculous, they're reliable, and you can always get another car later. Or a motorcycle. smily_headphones1.gif


Thanks for the advice Unclecool.gifMy brother was all over a motorcycle and my parents cant justify him getting one until hes out of the house. A STICK? Thats not how they teach us drivers trainingbiggrin.gifWhat do you guys think of a VW?

 

post #43 of 77
Do not buy a VW. They're notoriously unreliable. Even more frightening is that most VW owners know their car is unreliable and simply don't care. Avoid anything from Europe unless you're earning six figures and have an American or Japanese (or possibly Korean) car as a backup vehicle. European cars are expensive hobbies, not something you can rely on.

And forget driver's ed. You can learn to drive a stick in a few days. After a week, you'll forget you're driving a stick. After a month, you'll refuse to drive anything but a stick. I'm closing in on 250k miles on a stick. Not only are they more fun, they get better mileage and are cheap to repair. Get an older Japanese car with a stick. You'll save heaps of money while having a great time. You'll also find the transition to a motorcycle easy. Two wheels is as much fun as you can have with your clothes on.
post #44 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

Do not buy a VW. They're notoriously unreliable. Even more frightening is that most VW owners know their car is unreliable and simply don't care. Avoid anything from Europe unless you're earning six figures and have an American or Japanese (or possibly Korean) car as a backup vehicle. European cars are expensive hobbies, not something you can rely on.

And forget driver's ed. You can learn to drive a stick in a few days. After a week, you'll forget you're driving a stick. After a month, you'll refuse to drive anything but a stick. I'm closing in on 250k miles on a stick. Not only are they more fun, they get better mileage and are cheap to repair. Get an older Japanese car with a stick. You'll save heaps of money while having a great time. You'll also find the transition to a motorcycle easy. Two wheels is as much fun as you can have with your clothes on.


L3000.gifIm looking at Japanese cars Uncle, ill report back.

 

post #45 of 77
Japanese cars are great. But so are some American and Korean cars.

As for two-wheelers, I just love them. Even leaning through curves at 25MPH is hugely fun. One cousin races motorcycles semi-professionally up in Washington State. He rips around tracks at 150 MPH or faster. I love talking bikes and cars with him. Though he loves the track, he really enjoys taking ordinary bikes out and riding at the speed limit. He just wants to be on two wheels. I totally agree.

I don't know if it is true, but some say that riding a motorcycle requires as much skill and attention as flying a jet fighter. I haven't flown a jet fighter, but a motorcycle is entirely engaging. Just you and the road. Always fun. Though I don't recommend it to younger people. You nedd the protection of a car for a few years to learn how to read traffic. You'll get a sixth sense about what other cars are going to do. You have to understand that before you make yourself vulnerable on a bike.
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