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Looking for budget bookshelf speakers + power amp - Page 3

post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by brasewel View Post

Nice article Peete.

I will definitely consider getting a sub if I don't have to add a receiver to my current setup.

My preamp is a RSA Apache http://www.raysamuelsaudio.com/products/apache and power amp is a Rotel RB-970BX http://www.rotel.com/content/manuals/rb970bx_eng.pdf .

I have used the RCA line out from the preamp to feed the power amp while the preamp is fed with balanced outputs from my DAC.

The preamp has a set of balanced outputs as well that are not being used.

 

Cheers



Nice preamp....you can do this 1 of 2 ways. If the RSA's balanced outs are active at the same time as the SE'd outputs are then look for a Sub that can accept balanced input (ideally speaking a set of L/R subs in true stereo mode )....the second method is to use the SE'd outputs to the subs ( again 2 of them would ideal) and with the signal pass through of the sub plate amps (you'll need a pass through as feature of the sub amp in order to do this)  you then run those on to your Rotel amp. The best method is to get a hold of an outboard xover (active) like the Paradigm X-30 or the Velodyne SMS-1 system (for use with your choice of sub).

 

This is another excellent article worth reading  http://sound.westhost.com/project48.htm

 

Peete.


Edited by Pricklely Peete - 6/20/11 at 1:12pm
post #32 of 39
Thread Starter 

The pre-amp's balanced outputs are simultaneously active at the same time. If I go by the first method would I need to set the sub's crossover at it's lowest setting to just output the lowest frequencies since I don't have a receiver to manage the frequencies?

post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by brasewel View Post

The pre-amp's balanced outputs are simultaneously active at the same time. If I go by the first method would I need to set the sub's crossover at it's lowest setting to just output the lowest frequencies since I don't have a receiver to manage the frequencies?



Depends on the bass extension of main L/R speakers (if say 60 hz ) then set the sub plate xover at 60 hz...using the Paradigm X-30 or the SMS-1 system allows for more precise tuning ( the latter also EQ's with room response) and proper blending with your mains speakers. You also relieve the main amp (Rotel) of having to spend power on deep bass freq's which are now handled by the sub amps.

 

Peete.

post #34 of 39

My favorite budget speaker by far is the Silverline Minuet.  It has huge sound and amazingly deep bass for such a small bookshelf monitor.  These go for ~$350 used on Audiogon.  I've owned a handful of smaller (<10" high) bookshelf speakers and the Minuet's are far and away my favorites.  As a bonus, they are also made in USA (most inexpensive speakers come from communist China).

 

As for a budget amp, well, I can't recommend any solid state ones.  I really really like the Zen Triode from Decware (http://www.decware.com/newsite/tubes.html) they are an absolute bargain at that price, however with only 2 watts of output, they will require a very high sensitivity speaker (i.e. not the Minuets).  If you want solid-state, you have to spend some money to get a decent one.  Maybe look for a used Bryston 2B or something like that.


Edited by lupin..the..3rd - 6/22/11 at 7:53am
post #35 of 39
Thread Starter 

^^ The tweeter and woofer look awfully similar to the ones I got.

I've tried playing some 30-40hz frequency tones and surprisingly they were able to play them although not with the same authority a subwoofer would.

Mine are also manufactured in the US which is an added incentive.

post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackmccabe View Post

Studio stuff provides far better value equipment than the audiophile market, in which you mostly pay for the shiny finish and status that comes with it.

I would definitely go with active speakers because they are much more simplistic and are generally better value.

I have also found that expensive amps provide no audible improvement over any half decent well suited amplifier.

 

Amps that do make an audible difference are producing a large amount of distortion.


Active speakers and studio monitors are great for near field listening, if you're sitting at a desk, with your head 2 feet from the speakers.  They're not great for whole room listening.  And really?  You don't think the studio monitor market charges for their "shiny finish" either?  lol.  Guess you've never heard of Genelec or the like, where you can easily spend $8,000 on a single speaker.  Studio monitors are great for their intended purpose - for audio engineers in a recording studio.  They are not great for home use.  I know- I've owned several pairs including some from Adam Audio and Focal.  They sound "accurate" sure, but they also sound very cold and flat, no depth to the music whatsoever.  Fine if you're listening for some specific detail or note to master an album, but not at all fine when you want to kick back, close your eyes, put your feet up, and listen.  I'll never have a pair of active speakers in my home again.

 

post #37 of 39
Thread Starter 

Very interesting lupin. I think my opinion would mirror yours since I prefer to have some color to my music. 

post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by lupin..the..3rd View Post

Active speakers and studio monitors are great for near field listening, if you're sitting at a desk, with your head 2 feet from the speakers.  They're not great for whole room listening.  And really?  You don't think the studio monitor market charges for their "shiny finish" either?  lol.  Guess you've never heard of Genelec or the like, where you can easily spend $8,000 on a single speaker.  Studio monitors are great for their intended purpose - for audio engineers in a recording studio.  They are not great for home use.  I know- I've owned several pairs including some from Adam Audio and Focal.  They sound "accurate" sure, but they also sound very cold and flat, no depth to the music whatsoever.  Fine if you're listening for some specific detail or note to master an album, but not at all fine when you want to kick back, close your eyes, put your feet up, and listen.  I'll never have a pair of active speakers in my home again.

 

I find a lot of monitors are overpriced, but there are some great deals and I think you get better value for your money.

I also like to use an EQ to colour the sound rather than have the speakers do it.

 

I can't understand what you dislike about active speakers there are some really great "musical" actives out there, my dynaudio bm15s are fairly "musical".

 

post #39 of 39

I picked up a pair of Wharfedale Diamond 9.1s and a Linn Intek, which seem to work just fine.  : )

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