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Favorite Jazz album (50's/60's) and why? - Page 3

post #31 of 264
500
Another obvious, obvious is The Birth of the Cool, but like most of the obvious picks, it's known because it's amazing, both for the instrumentation and how it defines part of the jazz landscape in the post-bop period.

I think it's a flawless album, except for "Darn That Dream", which was added in 1971.
Edited by rroseperry - 5/15/11 at 2:45pm
post #32 of 264


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post

1. Kind Of Blue (Davis)

2. A Love Supreme (Coltrane)

3. Saxophon Collosus (Rollins)

4. Pithenonthropus Erectus (Mingus) 

5. The Black Saint and Sinner Lady (Mingus)

6. Brilliant Corners (Monk)

7. Giant Steps (Coltrane)

8. Milestones (Davis)

9. Soul Station (Mobley)

10. Something Else (Adderly/Davis)

 


All the folks here have several obvious, obvious ones, with the possible exception of Hank Mobley. For Charles Mingus, another huge one is Mingus Ah Um, which was kinda his breakthrough. I'm gonna chime in again with a little curveball, though, a tribute to one of the greatest singers ever, by one of the greatest singers ever: Carmen McRae Sings Lover Man and Other Billie Holiday Classics. It's genius…enjoy…

 

Carmen_McRae-Carmen_McRae_Sings_Lover_Man_2.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

post #33 of 264
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tru blu View Post


 


All the folks here have several obvious, obvious ones, with the possible exception of Hank Mobley. For Charles Mingus, another huge one is Mingus Ah Um, which was kinda his breakthrough. I'm gonna chime in again with a little curveball, though, a tribute to one of the greatest singers ever, by one of the greatest singers ever: Carmen McRae Sings Lover Man and Other Billie Holiday Classics. It's genius…enjoy…

 

Carmen_McRae-Carmen_McRae_Sings_Lover_Man_2.jpg

 

 

 

 

 



I think I may have been guilty of a little subjectivity with Mobley, it is a classic album but probably not quite as classic as the others. It was a toss between Ah um and Erectus with Mingus so I went for erectus because I think it was such a groundbreaker for the time. Also Blakey's "Moanin" could possibly replace Soul Station in the list.

 

I'm going to check out Carmen I'm intrigued!

 

post #34 of 264


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post

I think I may have been guilty of a little subjectivity with Mobley, it is a classic album but probably not quite as classic as the others. It was a toss between Ah um and Erectus with Mingus so I went for erectus because I think it was such a groundbreaker for the time. Also Blakey's "Moanin" could possibly replace Soul Station in the list.


I will not take responsibility for you ditching Hank Mobley etysmile.gif…he's a keeper, just maybe not quite as "obvious, obvious" to me as some of the others. I was gonna suggest Hank Mobley and His All Stars, just because it's like an Art Blakey record with the added treat of having vibraphonist Milt Jackson, one of the most natural blues improvisers in the history of jazz. But then I thought, why not just go straight for the source of Jackson's stardom, the Modern Jazz Quartet.

 

the-modern-jazz-quartet-the-modern-jazz-quartet.jpg

 

…a chamber-jazz classic for the wee-small hours, this is their eponymous album (it's sometimes referred to as "the album with no title")…I had it as an LP and wore out the 2nd side in particular…last thing: I noticed that up above TJ Elite mentioned the Swedish pianist Jan Johansson, a fine player (died too young in a car accident) whose jazz style was influenced in a big way by the MJQ's resident pianist John Lewis…and Lewis is also one of the pianists on Miles Davis' Birth Of The Cool, rroseperry's selection…clearly, that cat got around…

 


Edited by tru blu - 5/17/11 at 8:12am
post #35 of 264
Thread Starter 

Ofcourse the Modern Jazz Quartet! brilliant! I've just thought... I left out Coleman's "The Shape of Jazz to come" mmmm...

 

 

coleman.jpg

post #36 of 264


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post

Ofcourse the Modern Jazz Quartet! brilliant! I've just thought... I left out Coleman's "The Shape of Jazz to come" mmmm...


Yeah, when you think about it, it's pretty cool that the MJQ's John Lewis was among the first people to really champion Ornette. Their music's soooo different, but Lewis could hear it when a lot of folks from his generation couldn't…

 

post #37 of 264
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tru blu View Post


 


Yeah, when you think about it, it's pretty cool that the MJQ's John Lewis was among the first people to really champion Ornette. Their music's soooo different, but Lewis could hear it when a lot of folks from his generation couldn't…

 



I've been getting into this little gem lately. "New York is Now!" It's a one off collaberation with Ornette, Dewey Redman and the classic Coltrane rythm section, Garrison and Jones.

 

Now wether you think this quartet works or not, it is certainly an interesting listen. At first I was undecided who is following who... but It is now clear who the leader is Elvin Jones! He turns this into a brilliant sesion. There is some great interplay (if a little subdued for Ornette) between the 2 tenors. But you can almost feel Elvin's mind ticking away, thinking of where to go next. An extraordinary drummer. 

 

A new favortie of mine!

ornette new york.jpg

 

post #38 of 264


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post

I've been getting into this little gem lately. "New York is Now!" It's a one off collaberation with Ornette, Dewey Redman and the classic Coltrane rythm section, Garrison and Jones.

 

A new favortie of mine!


Then you'll probably want its companion, Love Call…it's from the same sessions. Great playing on that one, too.

 

post #39 of 264

OK, since I'm feeling like my digital rant may have dampened a good thread, here's where I try to keep it cookin'. But which way to turn? "Obvious, obvious"? Brilliant but a bit obscure? Well, how about tram-bone-phone player Grachan Moncur III?

 

evolution.jpg

 

…fantastic record…one of those post-bop, out-there-but-in-there masterpieces. Hell, if the personnel doesn't at least make y'all curious, there ain't nuthin' else I can say…'cept maybe that, unbelievably, drummer Tony Williams (that's Anthony) had just turned 18…how kray-zy is that?

 

 

post #40 of 264
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tru blu View Post

OK, since I'm feeling like my digital rant may have dampened a good thread, here's where I try to keep it cookin'. But which way to turn? "Obvious, obvious"? Brilliant but a bit obscure? Well, how about tram-bone-phone player Grachan Moncur III?

 

evolution.jpg

 

…fantastic record…one of those post-bop, out-there-but-in-there masterpieces. Hell, if the personnel doesn't at least make y'all curious, there ain't nuthin' else I can say…'cept maybe that, unbelievably, drummer Tony Williams (that's Anthony) had just turned 18…how kray-zy is that?

 

 



hah! now I have heard this one, and it is a belter! I'm a huge fan of Williams.  Your digital rant didn't dampen the thread, in fact you have been the most helpful out of all the posters! you were just pointing out that I originally wanted a little description of why a recording is a fave.

 

I managed to get Colemans "Love Call" and its marvelous!  

 

Cheers

post #41 of 264

This is a great thread.  I may be at where the op was three years ago; on the cusp of falling headlong into this thing..

 

keep pushing it, good people

 

popcorn.gif

post #42 of 264

Some really great albums listed on this page. 

 

This selection is a bit of a cheat. It's technically not "essential, essential", but then all of these songs can be found on the Complete Quartets With Sonny Clark disc, which is fairly "essential, essential" in my opinion.

 

Grant Green - Nigeria

 

Nigeria

 

This features fantastic synergy and interplay between Grant Green and Sonny Clark, the best of which can be found on It Ain't Necessarily So. While he's not the most technically proficient, Grant Green plays with such soul and swagger that makes him an undeniable guitar giant, in my eyes. He, and this album, completely epitomize the Blue Note house sound. 

 

post #43 of 264
Thread Starter 

 

This one is for the noobs, One of the best Blue Note recordings (if not the best!!) Its classic modern Jazz from 1964 and contains so many original ideas with incredible performances. Dolphy and Dorham work brilliant together. Another great early performance from Williams aswell. Every Andrew hill recording is different, especially his early recordings for blue note. I've collected most of his releases throughout his career and he is unjustifiably underrated.  

 

 

andrew.jpg

post #44 of 264

Beautiful!

post #45 of 264

If anyone likes Dixieland check out http://www.saltcity56.com/

This was a band my Dad was in during the late 50s, I know I'm a bit biased but they blow the Dukes out of the water when it comes to technique.

I'm pretty sure all their albums are up on the site to download for free.  The only issue is that some of them are pretty low quality, 192kbs and 128kbs.

My favorite album (the one dad is most prominent on, he plays trumpet) is here: http://www.saltcity56.com/roundtable
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LFF View Post

That recording of "Portrait of Frank Sinatra" by Oscar Peterson is awesome. It's another one of my favorites. "Oscar Peterson Trio - Live From Chicago" is also worth mentioning as is "Louis Armstrong Meets Oscar Peterson".

 

If you like the New Orleans Dixieland jazz, I would also recommend the original vinyl pressings of Louis Armstrong and The Dukes of Dixieland. The CD's suck which is unfortunate, but the vinyl LP's are fantastic. "Louis Armstrong Plays King Oliver" is another gem on vinyl.

 

An offbeat album I really enjoy is "Lyle Ritz - How About Uke". A great little album.



 

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