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Favorite Jazz album (50's/60's) and why? - Page 2

post #16 of 264
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post

Art Blakey - Free for All

Bill Evans - Waltz for Debby

Charles Mingus - Blues & Roots

Dexter Gordon - Go

Grant Green - Green Street

Herbie Hancock - Takin' Off; Empyrean Isles

Horace Silver - The Cape Verdean Blues

Jan Johanson - Jazz på ryska

Joe Henderson - Page One

John Coltrane - Coltrane Jazz; Coltrane's Sound; Crescent; Interstellar Space

Miles Davis - 'Round About Midnight; E.S.P.

Ornette Coleman - Free Jazz

Thelonious Monk - Monk's Music; Solo Monk

Tina Brooks - True Blue

 

It wasn't easy for me to stick just to the 50's and 60's while avoiding the best known albums. Most of these albums are likely familiar to serious jazz fans, but other people might find new favorites.



Very good list. I've got most of them but there is a few I'm definately going to check out because I can see you have taste! Jan Johanson, Tina Brooks haven't heard before. I have a real soft spot for Dextor Gordon, I think he is highly underated.

 

and Coltane's "Crescent" well.. it doesn't get much better!

post #17 of 264
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tru blu View Post

Well, if you want albums full of ideas and you like Monk, Bud and Andrew Hill, your next stop might be my man Jaki Byard.

 

c69717b1nr8.jpg

 

(…he does "'Round Midnight" on this one)

 

 

OJCCD-1913-2.jpg

 

(…wild and woolly…and this one opens with Bud's "Parisian Thoroughfare" and has Monk's "Evidence")

 

 

…and he makes a fine contribution to this one by Rahsaan Roland Kirk…hell, the title alone gets me halfway in the door: Rip, Rig and Panic

 

0000432423_182.jpg



All new to me, so I'm over the moon with these recomnendations. I've heard a bit of Kirk but not much, mostly his later stuff.  

 

Brilliant thanks

 

post #18 of 264
Thread Starter 

If I could just add a certain female at this point ....

 

This is a great album, big John Coltane influence at the time but with something extra. Maybe a feminine touch? I think she is amazing anyway, This is just inside the 60's before she ventured completely into fusion.  Alice has always had a certain "soul" (for look of a better word) in whatever she recorded and this is my favorite recording. Very spiritual just like her late husband.

alice.jpg

 

 

This is one of my current favorites, Dextor Gordon "One flight Up" Theres not much to say... its all in the laid back style of Dextor, Art Taylor on drums is just brilliant. I would also add that is another brilliant hifi recording for the time (1964) warm , lush and very good stereo imaging considering that most Blue Note recordings from the time were generally dry and small roomed.

 

 dextor.jpg

 

Just to add.. I hope I'm not coming across as a "know it all" on Jazz because I'm certainly not. I love music thats all. smile.gif

 


Edited by LugBug1 - 5/14/11 at 12:34pm
post #19 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by LFF View Post

Great recommendations but to me...those are obvious favorites.


Obvious or not, they're still my favorites. The Shorty Rogers selection isn't that obvious. I like his nontette work better than that much more famous nontette guy.


LOL! They are all my favorites as well. Shorty Rogers is awesome and the sound quality on his recordings aren't too shabby either. Even the list posted by TJ Elite seems like obvious favorites to me. Not complaining though. I figured I would post something more obscure but judging from the OP's following posts, I guess he is looking for obvious favorites, IMHO.

 

post #20 of 264
Well, obvious for some values of obvious. wink.gif The OP's relatively new to jazz so some "obvious" choices (like my Bud Powell suggestion) are going to revelations and new paths to him.
post #21 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post

 The OP's relatively new to jazz so some "obvious" choices (like my Bud Powell suggestion) are going to revelations and new paths to him.


I see that now but I didn't see that at all from his first post.

 

I would have skipped the obscure recommendations and gone to someone like Bud Powell, Jackie McLean, etc etc. Anyway....here are some more recommendations:

 

Clifford Jordan - Cliff Craft

Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers - Buhaina's Delight

Elvin Jones - The Ultimate

Elvin Jones - Puttin' It Together

Freddie Redd - Shades of Redd

Gil Melle - Patterns In Jazz

Horace Silver - Six Pieces of Silver

Kenny Burrell - Freedom

Jackie McLean - Jackie's Bag

Jackie McLean - High Frequency

Jackie McLean - Capuchin Swing

Lee Morgan - Candy

Freddie Roach - Good Move!

Cannonball Adderley - In the Land of HiFi

Barney Kessel - Some Like It Hot

Bill Evans - Quintessence

John Patton - Along Came John

Monica Zetterlund feat. Bill Evans Trio - Waltz For Debby

Coleman Hawkins - Coleman Hawkins And Confrères

Bill Evans Trio - Moonbeams

Bill Evans Trio - Portrait In Jazz

Cannonball Adderley - Know What I Mean

Clifford Brown - With Strings

Hampton Hawes - Hampton Hawes Trio, Vol. 1

Gerry Mulligan - Night Lights

George Wallington Quintet - Jazz For The Carriage Trade

Oscar Peterson Trio - We Get Requests

Wes Montgomery - Boss Guitar

Ike Quebec - It Might As Well Be Spring

Art Farmer & The Benny Golson Jazztet - Here and Now

Sonny Rollins - Way Out West

Art Pepper - Art Pepper + Eleven

Barney Kessel - The Poll Winners

Benny Carter - Jazz Giant

Chet Baker & Art Pepper - Playboys

 

and I have many more if anyone else wants more....

 

 

post #22 of 264
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LFF View Post




LOL! They are all my favorites as well. Shorty Rogers is awesome and the sound quality on his recordings aren't too shabby either. Even the list posted by TJ Elite seems like obvious favorites to me. Not complaining though. I figured I would post something more obscure but judging from the OP's following posts, I guess he is looking for obvious favorites, IMHO.

 


Just not obvious, obvious favorites! Really appreciate your contribution, thats why I added that I'm not a Jazz expert. Been collecting for about 3 years or so, thats why I wanted people to add personal faves as well. Please keep them coming as I am genuinely checking them out. 

post #23 of 264

Man..hard to believe not much mention on Oscar Peterson except LFF's mention of We Get Requests(fantastic recording).

 

Here are a couple of my favs....

Stan Getz And The Oscar Peterson TrioPlays the Cole Porter SongbookThe Oscar Peterson Trio at the Stratford Shakespearean FestivalThe Trio Live From ChicagoSound of the Trio: Vme Series
Portrait of F
Product Detailsrank SinatraSmokin at the Half NoteFull House

 

 

 

 

and the list goes on.....

 

 

 

post #24 of 264

That recording of "Portrait of Frank Sinatra" by Oscar Peterson is awesome. It's another one of my favorites. "Oscar Peterson Trio - Live From Chicago" is also worth mentioning as is "Louis Armstrong Meets Oscar Peterson".

 

If you like the New Orleans Dixieland jazz, I would also recommend the original vinyl pressings of Louis Armstrong and The Dukes of Dixieland. The CD's suck which is unfortunate, but the vinyl LP's are fantastic. "Louis Armstrong Plays King Oliver" is another gem on vinyl.

 

An offbeat album I really enjoy is "Lyle Ritz - How About Uke". A great little album.

post #25 of 264
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LFF View Post




I see that now but I didn't see that at all from his first post.

 

I would have skipped the obscure recommendations and gone to someone like Bud Powell, Jackie McLean, etc etc. Anyway....here are some more recommendations:

 

Clifford Jordan - Cliff Craft

Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers - Buhaina's Delight

Elvin Jones - The Ultimate

Elvin Jones - Puttin' It Together

Freddie Redd - Shades of Redd

Gil Melle - Patterns In Jazz

Horace Silver - Six Pieces of Silver

Kenny Burrell - Freedom

Jackie McLean - Jackie's Bag

Jackie McLean - High Frequency

Jackie McLean - Capuchin Swing

Lee Morgan - Candy

Freddie Roach - Good Move!

Cannonball Adderley - In the Land of HiFi

Barney Kessel - Some Like It Hot

Bill Evans - Quintessence

John Patton - Along Came John

Monica Zetterlund feat. Bill Evans Trio - Waltz For Debby

Coleman Hawkins - Coleman Hawkins And Confrères

Bill Evans Trio - Moonbeams

Bill Evans Trio - Portrait In Jazz

Cannonball Adderley - Know What I Mean

Clifford Brown - With Strings

Hampton Hawes - Hampton Hawes Trio, Vol. 1

Gerry Mulligan - Night Lights

George Wallington Quintet - Jazz For The Carriage Trade

Oscar Peterson Trio - We Get Requests

Wes Montgomery - Boss Guitar

Ike Quebec - It Might As Well Be Spring

Art Farmer & The Benny Golson Jazztet - Here and Now

Sonny Rollins - Way Out West

Art Pepper - Art Pepper + Eleven

Barney Kessel - The Poll Winners

Benny Carter - Jazz Giant

Chet Baker & Art Pepper - Playboys

 

and I have many more if anyone else wants more....

 

 



Brilliant! I've only got the Jackie Mclean and Blackey stuff from that list.. I'm going to be busy! Hope this is helpful for other collectors too.

 

Thanks

post #26 of 264

OK, so here's my pet peeve: The OP says specifically to name an album or two and state what you find interesting about it, but what we end up with are tons of lists. Personally, if I was just looking for that, I could Google any number of them. This kinda ties into my personal frustration with how in the digital age it seems like folks collect music without really interacting/living with it…music-appreciation measured by the space it takes up on your hard-drive. From reading, say, bigshot's posts, my sense is that he doesn't deal with music that way, so hearing his thoughts on Shorty Rogers might be really cool for everyone. Rant over…

 

…seeing Stan Getz above made me think of a fave that rarely gets namechecked…it's a late '60s disc, so it follows his bossa nova period, but what it shows is that even though Brazilian music had made him rich he hadn't been sleeping on the avant-garde stuff that was going on elsewhere…and it comes through in his sound. It's 1967 and Ron Carter and Chick Corea are in the rhythm section, so you know the swing was up-to-the-minute…"Litha", the first track, has surprised many people I've introduced to it, as has the version of Dizzy Gillespie's "Con Alma". 'I didn't really know he played like that' is usually what they say…

 

 

c0322872ars.jpg


Edited by tru blu - 5/15/11 at 7:23am
post #27 of 264
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tru blu View Post

OK, so here's my pet peeve: The OP says specifically to name an album or two and state what you find interesting about it, but what we end up with are tons of lists. Personally, if I was just looking for that, I could Google any number of them. This kinda ties into my personal frustration with how in the digital age it seems like folks collect music without really interacting/living with it…music-appreciation measured by the space it takes up on your hard-drive. From reading, say, bigshot's posts, my sense is that he doesn't deal with music that way, so hearing his thoughts on Shorty Rogers might be really cool for everyone. Rant over…

 

…seeing Stan Getz above made me think of a fave that rarely gets namechecked…it's a late '60s disc, so it follows his bossa nova period, but what it shows is that even though Brazilian music had made him rich he hadn't been sleeping on the avant-garde stuff that was going on elsewhere…and it comes through in his sound. It's 1967 and Ron Carter and Chick Corea are in the rhythm section, so you know the swing was up-to-the-minute…"Litha", the first track, has surprised many people I've introduced to it, as has the version of Dizzy Gillespie's "Con Alma". 'I didn't really know he played like that' is usually what they say…

 

 

c0322872ars.jpg



Yeah, thats what I was originally looking for. A little write up of why it is any good, so that it could be helpful or worth a little friendly debate with Jazz lovers. But I've just been pleased with any posts. You're totally right about the digital age and the fact we can get pretty much anything music wise and a lot of it for free..Its certainly not the same as when we used to save up for records (I'm 40 by the way) and you would play them to death. We can now have access to a recording in moments and moments later it can be forgotton about if we don't like it on first listen. And that is a shame because most great recordings for me tend to be grower's.  I remember buying my first album The Clash- London Calling, when I was 8 years old- I've still got it!  

 

Thanks.

 

I've never heard much Stan (and I really should!) but I'm familiar with the rythm section on that disc, Chick was miles late 60's drummer, different style to the amazing Tony Williams. Sounds interesting,      

 

post #28 of 264


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post


…Chick was miles late 60's drummer, different style to the amazing Tony Williams. Sounds interesting.    

 

 

…actually, tasty pro Grady Tate is the drummer…Chick Corea's a pianist, but yes, he gigged with Miles Davis…replaced Herbie Hancock in the touring band. For jazz purposes, piano is also considered part of the rhythm section…pianists kinda do double duty…harmonies as well as momentum…
 

…and for the record, I think London Calling should be in everyone's collection…both discs are perfect…


Edited by tru blu - 5/15/11 at 9:19am
post #29 of 264
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tru blu View Post


 

 

…actually, tasty pro Grady Tate is the drummer…Chick Corea's a pianist, but yes, he gigged with Miles Davis…replaced Herbie Hancock in the touring band. For jazz purposes, piano is also considered part of the rhythm section…pianists kinda do double duty…harmonies as well as momentum…
 

…and for the record, I think London Calling should be in everyone's collection…both discs are perfect…



Hah! well spotted... Shows how much I know ha ha (nervous laugh) thats why I need you guys to help me!  redface.gif

 

post #30 of 264
Thread Starter 

I think it may be fun to list the obvious, obvious favorites from 50's/60's and get them out of the way.  Also to see if you guys agree, or if you think that I've missed any out. Because you never know.. I might have missed an "absolute classic" during my first few years collecting Jazz. and also this will be helpfull for anyone starting out.  I own all of these and know them well.

 

Remember these are "Obvious, Obvious" favorites, because it could be argued that everything by say... Miles, Coltrane, Mingus for example, would be obvious.

 

Here is your starter for ten then (I've added the composer, just to be helpful for Jazz noobs, Not to insult intelligence) 

 

1. Kind Of Blue (Davis)

2. A Love Supreme (Coltrane)

3. Saxophon Collosus (Rollins)

4. Pithenonthropus Erectus (Mingus) 

5. The Black Saint and Sinner Lady (Mingus)

6. Brilliant Corners (Monk)

7. Giant Steps (Coltrane)

8. Milestones (Davis)

9. Soul Station (Mobley)

10. Something Else (Adderly/Davis)

 

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