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Why all HDMI cables are the same... from cnet news - Page 2

post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by upstateguy View Post

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-20056502-1.html?tag=nl.e702

 

From the article:  (it does, however, mention that it's possible that PCM data could be influenced by the different amounts of jitter inherent in all different cables.) 

 

Why all HDMI cables are the same

 

 

There's lots of money in cables. Your money.

 

Dozens of reputable and disreputable companies market HDMI cables, and many outright lie to consumers about the "advantages" of their product.

 

Worse, the profit potential of cables is so great, every retailer pushes high-end HDMI cables in the hopes of duping the buyer into spending tens, if not hundreds, of dollars more than necessary.

 

Here's the deal: expensive HDMI cables offer no difference in picture quality over cheap HDMI cables.

 

<snip>

 

So when the salesman tries to up-sell you on $300 HDMI cables that are the "only way to make your new 240 Hz TV work," politely tell him he is incorrect and to move on with the sale.

 

Or let me put it another way, if you're paying more than $5 for a two-meter HDMI cable, you're overpaying.


 

 


Saw that Eric a few days ago and with my experiences, I agree completely. My $3 monoprice HDMI cables are as good (and actually better constructed) than my 1 and only expensive HDMI cable.
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by cifani090 View Post

I somewhat have to disagree. A price of a cable is determined with labor, and material cost. Some people like to charge $60 an hour, while others will charge $.30 an hour for a cable. Last time i checked most things nowadays are not made in the U.S. I do understand that the people who charge $600+ for a cable are very unreal, and promise things that are almost impossible. People like me that are sick of there crappy "brand-name" products breaking, will understand to have a reputation and a company that will stand behind there product is quite hard to find nowadays. With that said i think its not hard to say that me as well as several others will pay a bit extra for a nice quality cable, which does what it should do, and will have a good ma and pa customer service that will help you out.

 


Wrong, the price of an item is determined by the market, ie how much people are willing to pay for it. If an item's production costs are higher than its market price, it won't get produced, period. If there's still is someone to produce if and sell it at a price superior to market price, it won't get sold, and the producer will go bankrupt.

 

The exception to this rule is luxury items, where the higher the item is priced, the more prestige it gains. The "value" of the item is arbitrarily set by its price, in total decorrelation with its production costs, R&D costs...A higher price becomes an asset.

 

One of the reason audiophilia has become marginalized is precisely this: in a lot of aspects, audiophile products are luxury items, especially when cables and tweaks are concerned.

post #18 of 25
The price of a cable does not determine quality. Sure, you can pay someone $60/hour to build one. But that does not mean the quality betters a $1.50 one off Monoprice.
post #19 of 25

Yeah  my 2 dollar hdmi cables seem to have the same quality as the 100+ dollar monster ones.

post #20 of 25

I have seen technical comparisons, though, that show that extremely long HDMI cables may not work properly under certain situations, and that cheapo HDMI cables probably won't work for 3D 4K video.  Though that's still a ways off in the future yet.

post #21 of 25

This same thing can be applied to USB cables as well.

 

Essentially the only differences that matter is durability and not having a short in it. Bottom line you can get this with $3 or $300. As was said before HDMI and USB are digital, either the bits get there or they don't  and its either a 1 or a 0. Its not like analog where a signal might get there but get warped and change how it sounds. There are very few things which would could cause a 1 and 0 be be confused and therefor effect sound quality: 1 very long distances because the signal becomes so weak the recieveing hardware can't determine if its a 1 or 0. 2. High voltage EMF. So if your hdmi cable passes your homes transformer then you need to both up your budget from a $3 cable to a $4.50 that a little better shielded, and get your tv out of your backyard. For indoors you could strip the wires and there still wouldn't be enough interference to mess with the signal. The other thing is that when you computer discovers a missing data or that the data has errors in it, it does an amazing thing....it corrects it. Thats right it either ask for the a resend (so maybe your preformance is slowed by 5 Planck seconds) or it just fixes it on its own because it already knows what it was supposed to be. Your computer believe it or not is making 100s of transfer errors every second but your computer corrects them.

 

As I said th same snake oil practice is given to usb cables. Next time you go to the store look at some of these "high quality" usb cables. Many of them claim the usb shell (aka the part of the usb protects the 4 pins that make the connection) are gold plated. Well the problem is that part  doesn't even do anything except protect the pins from getting dust on them or getting crushed! Why would you gold plate that, it doesn't have anything to do with the quality of your connection! But they are hoping most customers are are not tech savvy enough to know this. Complete and utter false advertisement!

post #22 of 25

lmao
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dsf3g View Post

The article is wrong. I replaced my cheap $10.00 HDMI cable with a $300.00 Parabrum Exoticom MKIV and went back and watched some of my old DVDs and suddenly all my favorite actresses were naked in some scenes in which they hadn't been naked before. I'm never going back to cheap cables.

 

I've read quite a few monoprice vs boutique-ish cable (>$30) comparisons on the web, professional and amateur, and they all mostly say monoprice and boutique hdmi cables are the same at short lengths (but still much longer than the average consumer needs), while the boutique hdmi cables edged out the monoprice cables at higher lengths.
 

 

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by rymd View Post

lmao
 

 

I've read quite a few monoprice vs boutique-ish cable (>$30) comparisons on the web, professional and amateur, and they all mostly say monoprice and boutique hdmi cables are the same at short lengths (but still much longer than the average consumer needs), while the boutique hdmi cables edged out the monoprice cables at higher lengths.
 

 



However, I'm pretty sure these tests are mostly theoretical tests with advanced testing equipment, the only differences you can see are ones that'd be blatantly obvious, like weird artifacts on the screen, a double image or nothing at all.  Still though, 99.9% of people out there would be perfectly fine with a monoprice cable.

post #24 of 25

Here are two sources of interesting information regarding this topic.  The first mentions the HDMI standard includes two error correction bits per byte which likely helps significantly to reconstruct degraded signals regardless of cable quality:

 

http://www.audioholics.com/education/display-formats-technology/hdmi-interface-a-beginners-guide

 

The other article discusses issues with long cable runs:

 

http://www.bluejeanscable.com/articles/whats-the-matter-with-hdmi.htm

 

It seems to me that a repeater system would help for long cable runs.  I have an active switch which also functions as a repeater.  It cost $25.

 

I know when I first got into HDTV, Frys tried to sell me a $100 cable to go with my TV/DVD player combination.  I pointed out they had a DVD on sale that day for $80 which included the HDMI cable.  The sale person was floored and thought it was such a great deal.  I told him he was trying to sell me an over priced cable, went to the computer cable section of the store, and got a 4 m cable for $20.

 

I've never had any issues with any of my low cost HDMI cables.

post #25 of 25

MONSTER CABLES ARE EATING OUR MONEY?!?!

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