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post #2941 of 3424
I feel we are getting onto semantics here, and someone is jumping in the trenches to defend his choice of words...

Rega is a very decent manufacturer that has done the record industry a tremendous deal of good, not just by it's designs but also by it's attitude. And how this proves to be the smart choice in the end. The Rega arm (+fitting) is a de facto standard, and since copying is the ultimate compliment, it is also good publicity for them. In the end it helps their reputation as well as their sales. Manufacturers (of confectioned goods, not customwares) that allow customers to tweak and upgrade their products to this extent (selling parts and thus service) is a rare thing - in the whole world! I think it is marvelous that a manufacturer generously allows competitors to buy parts and improve their ideas. And in the process helps them get new ideas and feedback on their products.

That all said, Rega is still a UK manufacturer. And that means; reputation. Just like German, Italian or Japanese. Or US.
Warning: sarcastic generalisations ahead! (take with a rock of salt and a sense of humor wink.gif ).
German often means: sturdy, well designed, no frills. Italian means; "oh look at me" "Oh no it broke". Japanese: this is perfect, you can buy, only this price (until there is a defect, than an executive takes all the blame in a filled pressroom while bending over and crying profoundly and heartfelt). In the US (do I dare say this?) we are biggest, best, strongest and the intelligentest of the whole world. Big bold and cluncky. But it (doesn't) allways work(s). And then there is the English way. They are smart thinkers and bright tinkerers. But shoddy manufacturers and finishers (is the pub open yet?). Oh, and I forgot Chinese: You want this? We can make it for you (and copy your designs and sell them + QC fails on the black market).
All over the world there are dreamers, thinkers, artists, craftsmen, merchants and conmen. Unfortunately one can't do without the other. And don't forget transport...

Most of the time I must agree with analogsurviver. Like up^
Just, a few posts back where he commented on belts... that was kind of a booboo. The belt has nothing to do with the right speed. You can use a rubberband, a fishingline, a rope or a cable, the speed is determined only by the speed of the motor devided by the ratio of the two wheelsizes ((sub)platter / pulleysize).
Pulleysize x motorspeed == plattersize x platterspeed. No strings attached. :P

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post #2942 of 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by ]eep View Post

Just, a few posts back where he commented on belts... that was kind of a booboo. The belt has nothing to do with the right speed. You can use a rubberband, a fishingline, a rope or a cable, the speed is determined only by the speed of the motor devided by the ratio of the two wheelsizes ((sub)platter / pulleysize).
Pulleysize x motorspeed == plattersize x platterspeed. No strings attached. :P

I used to believe that about belt as well. Then I ended up working for a company that was one of the two largest suppliers of replacements belts for VCRs Cassette decks, turntables etc. across Europe. It's actually easy to test once you know how to. By just varying a belt size between -5 to +5% and then measuring the speed of rotation of a turntable with an accurate enough strobe, you can clearly see the speed of rotation of the platter changing by quite a large margin. The reason for that turns out to be the slippage experience by the motor pulley when the belt tension is too slack.  

post #2943 of 3424

Just wanted to share another mod I did to my P3-24. I put some sorbothane (a shock absorbing and vibration damping material) between the platter and sub-platter. The stuff relies on having a certain load so I had to weigh the platter first and then calculate the right amount of sorbothane needed. The result is most notable in the highs which are clearer now. I did have to shim the arm a little as I was using a 3mm thick sheet to cut pieces from. Another good thing about this material is that because it is malleable and thanks to gravity the platter will end up exactly level. 

 

 

Also, here is a nice video on sorbothane. I though it was kinda funny.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVN98EwM3l0


Edited by Jasper9395 - 3/6/14 at 8:07am
post #2944 of 3424
'kinda funny' biggrin.gif
I call it hilarious. Talk about product confidence... letting a hulk hammer away with a mallet on your own fingers.

As long as the platter stays perfectly level... but that depends on the distribution of the pieces. That needs to be quite even. It's just like balancing a car tire.
Quote:
The reason for that turns out to be the slippage experience by the motor pulley when the belt tension is too slack.
Yes, but with a belt that doesn't slip it doesn't affect speed. Only wow and flutter. Slipping occurs when friction on the platter is greater than the force the belt can transmit. On a good TT friction is minimal, depending on choices. For instance a Dr Feickert has a high friction axle on purpose. And not counting spin-up (F=M*a).
Edited by ]eep - 3/6/14 at 9:24am
post #2945 of 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by ]eep View Post

'kinda funny' biggrin.gif
I call it hilarious. Talk about product confidence... letting a hulk hammer away with a mallet on your own fingers.

As long as the platter stays perfectly level... but that depends on the distribution of the pieces. That needs to be quite even. It's just like balancing a car tire.
 

 I guess 'kinda funny' was an understatement :normal_smile :.

 

Your quite right about the distribution of the pieces being important. However, it is much easier to get it right when using sorbothane compared to rubber. Before there was a rubber band inside the groove in the sub-platter which made the platter a bit wobbly. It made me have to spend way to much time adjusting it. With the sorbothane as long as the distribution is roughly equal everything stays level.

post #2946 of 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by parbaked View Post
 
 

You are still not getting my point: The RP6 is a "better" TT without modification. In fact the RP6 does not require or really benefit from further modifications. 

 

What you perhaps don't understand is that all these aftermarket modifications e.g. Groovetacer, Origin Live, Mr. Lim etc, are designed to bring the lower Rega models up to the RP6 level, not to improve the RP6. 

The RP6 already has a fantastic machined sub-platter and a very sophisticated 2-piece glass platter that interface perfectly. 

The only way to improve an RP6 is to replace the tonearm or the plinth in which case you have an RP8. 

 

Please consider how much technology is packed into the RP6.

It takes the Rega model of 1) light stiff plinth, 2) quiet motor, 3) light stiff one piece tone arm almost as far as it can go without really hitting diminishing returns:

http://www.needledoctor.com/Rega-RP6-Turntable_2?sc=2&category=353

 

If the RP3 is a Golf, the RP6 is 3 Series...Cheers!

Perhaps if the RP8 had been available when I bought the RP6, I might have been tempted.  Part of me just wanted to "trick out" the unit but I think the benefits are real.    Why wouldn't I think that, I must justify the bucks spent.:regular_smile :  After fifty years of dealing with sprung turntables, I'm loving the simplicity of Rega so I'm gonna show the love by "improving" the table.

 

The Ortofon cartridge is better than the whatever they call it that is recommended for the RP6.  Rega cartridges have very little street cred.  I always liked the Ortofons I've had in the past although they were MCs.

 

I believe (you gotta have faith) that the underslung counterweight is an improvement over stock.

 

The GT jewel bearing is an improvement over stock.

 

The GT subplatter is all aluminum as opposed to the plastic wonder underbelly of the stock subplatter.  "Fantastic" does not come to mind.

 

  AppleMarkAppleMark

 

 

 

Althought the stock glass platter is nice, I prefer the slightly heavier delrin platter (gives a little more of the flywheel effect) and I don't need a platter mat.  The center of the GT platter is dished to accomodate the record label.  Mats are a pain, don't you agree?

 

The white belt is at least 2X thicker than the stock black.  I notice more torq is available when running my Hunt carbon fiber brush over the record for one last swipe at the dust bunnies.

 

Does my RP6 sound better now?  

 

I think so. 


Edited by bbophead - 3/6/14 at 11:36am
post #2947 of 3424
Quote:
Does my RP6 sound better now?  

 

I think so. 

I am with you on that all the way.

post #2948 of 3424

I have the same experience with my p3-24, the upgrades make a huge differance. The table I have now is so much better than the one I started off with!

post #2949 of 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbophead View Post
 

The GT subplatter is all aluminum as opposed to the plastic wonder underbelly of the stock subplatter.  "Fantastic" does not come to mind.

  

Althought the stock glass platter is nice, I prefer the slightly heavier delrin platter (gives a little more of the flywheel effect) and I don't need a platter mat.  The center of the GT platter is dished to accomodate the record label.  

 

Mats are a pain, don't you agree?

 

The white belt is at least 2X thicker than the stock black.  I notice more torq is available when running my Hunt carbon fiber brush over the record for one last swipe at the dust bunnies.

 

Does my RP6 sound better now?  

Sorry to confuse! Rega has upgraded models. It looks like your RP6 is like the new RP3 with an upgraded outboard power supply???

The RP6 NOW comes with a much better sub-platter/platter than any after-market combination. Hence my raving description as fantastic!

 

All this for $1500 = pretty cool.

The key is the interface between platter and sub-platter but please read description for yourself.

ttp://www.needledoctor.com/Rega-RP6-Turntable_2?sc=2&category=353

 

One silly thing about the beautifully machined after-market sub-platters is most need rubber feet or grommets between the metal and glass (or Delrin) platters.

The cheap plastic stock sub-platter don't need that. 

Also some machined subs don't grip the belt like the textured plastic and require special belt or the white one.

The bearings etc are much better on the pimp sub-platters but the rubber feet bug me, especially as far as being level...

 

The bad thing about mats is you can't see your pimping sub-platter!!

 

Yes better belt is great for brushing!!

 

I have experience modifying Regas. In my experience these are the key mods/upgrades to the older P-2/3/5 series, with which I am familiar:

1. Cartridge - yes the Ortofons are perfect whatever color you can afford!

2. Stable platform or shelf.

3. Isolate motor (de-couple from plinth using a separate base) 

4. Replace RB250 plastic stub/counterweight - RB300/303 are fine...

 

The ones that are most often regretted/reversed are:

1. re-cabling tone-arm

2. acrylic platters

 

 

 

Your RP6 is pimping! I love it...cheers!

I was only saying that if I had the new one, I wouldn't change anything...just spend my money on the cartridge and music...just my 2 cents.

post #2950 of 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by parbaked View Post

 

Your RP6 is pimping! I love it...cheers!

I was only saying that if I had the new one, I wouldn't change anything...just spend my money on the cartridge and music...just my 2 cents.

I think your quite right! I drooled over the RP6, 8, and 10 tables when they came out. Rega seems to have incorporated so many things which the people modifying the older tables are doing.

 

It will be very interesting to see how people are going to improve on these new tables.

 

BTW, I think I am going to de-couple the motor from the plinth of my p3 next. It seems like such a obvious yet cheap upgrade!


Edited by Jasper9395 - 3/6/14 at 1:19pm
post #2951 of 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasper9395 View Post
 

I drooled over the RP6, 8, and 10 tables when they came out.

 

Rega seems to have incorporated so many things which the people modifying the older tables are doing.

 

BTW, I think I am going to de-couple the motor from the plinth of my p3 next. It seems like such a obvious yet cheap upgrade!

 

It looks like Rega put the RP8 sub platter/platter on the new RP6 and put the braced plinth from the RP6 on the new RP3...so many upgrades they should have re-named the RP6 and RP3. 

 

Yes, even the plinth brace was done by modifiers years ago. Mr. Lim's blog is a great resource: http://lpturntables.blogspot.com/2013/02/top-metal-bracing-for-rega-turntables.html

 

He also makes a fine motor isolation base: http://lpturntables.blogspot.com/2010/11/motor-isolation-base-for-rega.html

 

I use his feet which are very good, no wobble: http://lpturntables.blogspot.com/2011/10/standing-and-singing-better-on-new-feet.html

post #2952 of 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by parbaked View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasper9395 View Post
 

I drooled over the RP6, 8, and 10 tables when they came out.

 

Rega seems to have incorporated so many things which the people modifying the older tables are doing.

 

BTW, I think I am going to de-couple the motor from the plinth of my p3 next. It seems like such a obvious yet cheap upgrade!

 

It looks like Rega put the RP8 sub platter/platter on the new RP6 and put the braced plinth from the RP6 on the new RP3...so many upgrades they should have re-named the RP6 and RP3. 

 

Yes, even the plinth brace was done by modifiers years ago. Mr. Lim's blog is a great resource: http://lpturntables.blogspot.com/2013/02/top-metal-bracing-for-rega-turntables.html

 

He also makes a fine motor isolation base: http://lpturntables.blogspot.com/2010/11/motor-isolation-base-for-rega.html

 

I use his feet which are very good, no wobble: http://lpturntables.blogspot.com/2011/10/standing-and-singing-better-on-new-feet.html

Where can I buy this "wobble" you speak of?  I don't have any.:D

post #2953 of 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by parbaked View Post
 

Yes, even the plinth brace was done by modifiers years ago. Mr. Lim's blog is a great resource

Yep, I'm aware of the Mr. Lim stuff. His blog has so many interesting ideas on it and his products have a great reputation indeed. I got my sub-platter, dual pulley, extra belts, new bearing and oil from an Argentinan guy called Gus though. The whole package was only 65 pounds!

 

This is his ebay shop:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/crimson_ml_1969


Edited by Jasper9395 - 3/6/14 at 2:28pm
post #2954 of 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbophead View Post
 

Where can I buy this "wobble" you speak of?  I don't have any.:D

 

That hasn't been a problem since the early Planar series, if I recall correctly. Hell, even the original MDF platter on my P2 was dead on.

post #2955 of 3424
Quote:
Originally Posted by calipilot227 View Post
 

 

That hasn't been a problem since the early Planar series, if I recall correctly. Hell, even the original MDF platter on my P2 was dead on.

We were referring to the self-leveling stock rubber feet, not the platter.

I remember that platter wobble was a reason to upgrade the sub-platter. 

I actually have an P-5 sub-platter on my P-2 as Rega supposedly selected the closest tolerance plastic parts for the P-5...

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