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Post A Photograph Of Your Turntable - Page 189

post #2821 of 3417

I have a whole separate thread on this but it was suggested I post this here....

 

This is a Pioneer PL-600 I restored from trash worthy to a modern looking beauty. She now runs and sounds flawless, full auto, and not bad to look at either..Please note...ShE IS RED...Some of the pictures give it a pink caste...That's my camera phone NOT the table. I post a picture from my wife's phone so you can see the real color..LOL

 

 

This is how bad she started out when I bought it for $40 bucks...LOL

 

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post #2822 of 3417

Great restore job arcorob! It looks great!

post #2823 of 3417
Quote:
Originally Posted by longbowbbs View Post
 

Great restore job arcorob! It looks great!

+1.

post #2824 of 3417

Just traded in the entry-level kit for an Ariston RD-11S.  Grace 747 tonearm, Shure M91ED cart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beautiful, innit?


Edited by Delirious Lab - 1/24/14 at 7:52pm
post #2825 of 3417

Wow...beautiful is a tame word for it !!! Congratulations...

post #2826 of 3417

Sure is nice.  Enjoy!

post #2827 of 3417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delirious Lab View Post
 

Just traded in the entry-level kit for an Ariston RD-11S.  Grace 747 tonearm, Shure M91ED cart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beautiful, innit?

Beautiful it ain't.

 

Just joking - RD-11S was a designed by Hamisch Robertson http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linn_Products - there is very little difference from the early Linn Sondek LP12 - square section belt/motor pulley being the most notable. It has classic, timelessly good appearence.

 

Grace G 747 ( a detacheable headshell version of more known/popular G 707 ) is, if and when working properly ( bearing adjustment(s)) , still a formidable tonearm. Despite being low mass, it can accomodate all but lowest compliance MCs - but its real forte is with high/highish/medium compliance MMs. It can be further improved by counterweight - but that is something to consider at a later stage.

 

Shure 91, although nothing to write home about, is a decent performer at least.

 

I guess this TT in its present form has all but removed issues with high pitched female voices in your operas :atsmile:.

I am still using main bearing and platter from the RD-11S - since late 70s. It is a durable piece of kit - take good care of it - and enjoy :beerchug:.

post #2828 of 3417
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post
 

Beautiful it ain't.

 

Just joking - RD-11S was a designed by Hamisch Robertson http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linn_Products - there is very little difference from the early Linn Sondek LP12 - square section belt/motor pulley being the most notable. It has classic, timelessly good appearence.

 

Grace G 747 ( a detacheable headshell version of more known/popular G 707 ) is, if and when working properly ( bearing adjustment(s)) , still a formidable tonearm. Despite being low mass, it can accomodate all but lowest compliance MCs - but its real forte is with high/highish/medium compliance MMs. It can be further improved by counterweight - but that is something to consider at a later stage.

 

Shure 91, although nothing to write home about, is a decent performer at least.

 

I guess this TT in its present form has all but removed issues with high pitched female voices in your operas :atsmile:.

I am still using main bearing and platter from the RD-11S - since late 70s. It is a durable piece of kit - take good care of it - and enjoy :beerchug:.

 

I haven't tried it with Wagner yet.  Thanks for (apparently) confirming what I already suspected, that the Shure cart seems to be the weak point in this kit.

 

Funny, my wife (who doesn't give a rat's ass about SQ) doesn't like the looks of this turntable.  And here I thought this one had a pretty high WAF...

post #2829 of 3417
Now THAT is vintage.
post #2830 of 3417
Quote:
Originally Posted by ]eep View Post

Now THAT is vintage.

You can say that again.  The platter weighs a ton and the power switch is almost as hard to push as the main breaker in my house.  I read that the recommended thing, to help the motor live a long life, is to 1) give the platter a manual push before hitting the switch, and 2) leave it spinning bewteen sides.

 

The suspended platter makes a very, very quiet TT.  I can rap my knuckles on the dust cover and not hear a thing from the speakers.

post #2831 of 3417
Quote:
Originally Posted by ]eep View Post

Now THAT is vintage.

It is only 40 years YOUNG - and quality never becomes obsolete.

post #2832 of 3417

Very nice! Glad they moved to wood trim option. From what I have read these are solid tables. I considered an Ovation when getting back into vinyl.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by arcorob View Post
 

Wow..a friend just showed me a picture of my Clearaudio Concept table with the new wood trim (instead of my brushed aluminum) .. I like it !

 

post #2833 of 3417
I normally spin the platter up with the last twist of the puck. It helps saving the belt from slipping. And I hardly ever turn the motor off. When I had a Linn I always kept the platter spinning while changing. This is quite easy with the felt mat.

I don't really know why this is (maybe because I keep modding my phonoamp to ever increasing heights), but I keep hearing hum from the motor/belt when I play. If I take off the belt and spin it by hand it's dead quiet. Now that I hear it I keep noticing it. I just can't unhear it. mad.gif
post #2834 of 3417
Quote:
Originally Posted by ]eep View Post

I normally spin the platter up with the last twist of the puck. It helps saving the belt from slipping. And I hardly ever turn the motor off. When I had a Linn I always kept the platter spinning while changing. This is quite easy with the felt mat.

I don't really know why this is (maybe because I keep modding my phonoamp to ever increasing heights), but I keep hearing hum from the motor/belt when I play. If I take off the belt and spin it by hand it's dead quiet. Now that I hear it I keep noticing it. I just can't unhear it. mad.gif


It's probably your motor transferring vibration through the belt. Your transparent phonoamp might be revealing too much about the table? Bring it to someone with a better table and test it out.

post #2835 of 3417
The vibration from the motor has to go somewhere. Some designs mount the motor solidly to the chassis, allowing it to act as a vibration sink of sorts, while isolating the plinth from those elements. Others use an opposite approach, and then there's everything in between. If the plinth is isolated, for example, the motor vibrations will still (likely) reach the stylus. My current 'table is similar. So, how did I lessen the noise to the point where it's virtually inaudible? First step, drain the vibration from the motor housing. This can be done mechanically by using something as simple as a firmly attached spike (at the bottom of the housing) resting on a proper material. This, with returning of the suspension yielded excellent results (in my case). Dampening the motor housing, I found, to be difficult in terms of effectiveness. YMMV
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