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Post A Photograph Of Your Turntable - Page 114

post #1696 of 3517

How are you liking it?

post #1697 of 3517

You gotta say YES to another excess : record weight tres particuler ( mistook it for the Tour de Eiffel )

 

http://www.vinylengine.com/turntable_forum/gallery/image.php?mode=large&image_id=20377


Edited by analogsurviver - 4/26/13 at 4:48pm
post #1698 of 3517

If they do one shaped like a Lightsaber (with glow to aid the needledrop) i'm sold.

post #1699 of 3517
Quote:
Originally Posted by calipilot227 View Post

How are you liking it?

So far so good, so very good. I'm still burning in the cartrigde, but i already can see a improvement from the day i unboxed it, i'm discovering things and samples in my vinyl that my old technics couldn't bring up. I totally recommend the RP1, master bang for the buck.

post #1700 of 3517
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post

You gotta say YES to another excess : record weight tres particuler ( mistook it for the Tour de Eiffel )

 

http://www.vinylengine.com/turntable_forum/gallery/image.php?mode=large&image_id=20377

 

Wouldn't too much weight screw up D/D and belt-drive systems?

post #1701 of 3517

It really all depends on the turntable.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BLACKENEDPLAGUE View Post

 

Wouldn't too much weight screw up D/D and belt-drive systems?

post #1702 of 3517
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLACKENEDPLAGUE View Post

 

Wouldn't too much weight screw up D/D and belt-drive systems?

I thought it to be more joke than anything else, but since it was on a still normally looking suspended subchassis Thorens, it must be relatively low weight. My personal preference is for clamps that usually do not weigh more than 100 or so grams - unlikely to cause any ill effects even in low mass subchassis designs. Record weight has to be more massive than that in order to have a chance to perform, but more strain put on the main bearing of lesser turntables can lead to premature use etc.

It can also disrupt the subchassis adjustment, in more extreme cases platter/subchassis might sink

enough to brush against the plinth, etc . 

 

It really depends on the characteristics of the turntable.

post #1703 of 3517

don't forget increased bearing noise

post #1704 of 3517
Quote:
Originally Posted by s4s4s4 View Post

don't forget increased bearing noise

You are correct. However, if 100 gram additional mass is going to increase bearing noise, that bearing was designed with next to zero tolerance for increased mass - and a heavy LP pressing of say 200 gram is 80 gram more than "regular" 120 gram pressing. That 80 gram is more of a difference than some light clamps on the market.

 

Now very much  TTs are built like Melco from Japan ( something describable in superlatives only, if a tank and a Melco crash, likelihood of tank coming out of this encounter unscaved is slim ... ), but any reasonable bearing should be capable of supporting at least additional 100 - 500 gram without ill effects. Check with the TT manufacturer to stay on the safe side.

post #1705 of 3517

Can 100 gram weights make a difference? I'm holding my coin box which is 99.5 grams and it feels too light to flatten the record.

post #1706 of 3517
Quote:
Originally Posted by penmarker View Post

Can 100 gram weights make a difference? I'm holding my coin box which is 99.5 grams and it feels too light to flatten the record.

that's probably why many people shoot for threaded clamps

post #1707 of 3517

There is a bit of misconception that found its way into the clamp weight market and method of use. The weight can only keep the center of the record flat. If you got a light weight vinyl and a soft mat, a heavy weight will actually cause the record to buckle upwards at the outer edge.

post #1708 of 3517

Record weights placed over label area only can go so far - they can not flatten a "concave dished" record, they can achieve flattening only with "convex dished". In most cases, they will make situation of perfectly flat record that would have been in contact with rhe platter/mat across the whole surface, as it should have been supported, worse - by lifting the record at its outer edge.

 

Threaded clamps are basically the same thing - IF they do not use some kind of washer around the spindle, stressing the record across label area and usually sucessful in flattening even "concave dished" rercords. For those with normal unthreaded spindles - if there is a reasonable amount of spindle protruding above the record label, there are a few commercially available clamps that grab on whatever reasonably available spindle and achieve the goal by using some washer under the spindle. Usually, this amount of spindle is very limited and the thickness of the washer under the spindle must be meticulously adjusted to just achieve flattening and still hold well enough not to loose grip during one side of the record, say 30 minutes. If your case happens to be on the verge of achieving this with normal 120-140g records, you will curse 180 g and heavier pressings - usually, they can not be clamped using unthreaded clamp with washer under the spindle. 

 

THE MOST BASIC RULE : whatever you are using in order to flatten the record and bring it in contact with the platter/mat across the whole surface - if you look from the profile and can see any gap between the platter/mat and record itself - this whatever is not doing its job properly. 

Record weights are particularly prone to doing this, one of the solutions adopted by some manufacturers was to use slightly concave dished platter and/or mat, most commonly used without any weights or clamps.

 

All that said - once you hear - or better live with vacuum hold down system - for at least a weekend, you will grasp that no weight/clamp can give so good results. It would have to weigh some 200 kg, evenly distributed across the entire record surface - Mission Impossible.

 

Vacuum hold down  is NOT without drawbacks ( besides being pricey ) - it will force you to scrupolously clean the

UNPLAYED surface of the record and platter/mat - any debris caught in the middle can get imbeded//pressed into vinyl leading from increase in noise to skipping. Although it is the only method of getting severely warped records ( short of record flattener devices ) into playable condition, its greatest forte is with normally warped/flat discs - once heard, it is hard to go back to non vacuum hold down system.

post #1709 of 3517

Well, back to square one. Lost the ebay auction...Time to re-evaluate what I want since I was not willing to up the bid on the unit I was trying for....

post #1710 of 3517
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post

You are correct. However, if 100 gram additional mass is going to increase bearing noise, that bearing was designed with next to zero tolerance for increased mass - and a heavy LP pressing of say 200 gram is 80 gram more than "regular" 120 gram pressing. That 80 gram is more of a difference than some light clamps on the market.

 

Now very much  TTs are built like Melco from Japan ( something describable in superlatives only, if a tank and a Melco crash, likelihood of tank coming out of this encounter unscaved is slim ... ), but any reasonable bearing should be capable of supporting at least additional 100 - 500 gram without ill effects. Check with the TT manufacturer to stay on the safe side.

I meant the big big heavy weights not the 100g ones

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