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Post A Photograph Of Your Turntable - Page 95

post #1411 of 3359

The partial story of 

 

 

                                                              The Sleeping Beauty

 

It is the Technics SL-DL 1 linear tracking direct drive turntable. A direct descendant of the SL-7, in normal footprint size, with which it does share most of its vital components, such as direct drive motor and pick up arm, which are identical for the two. SL-7 itself rectified many of the terminal teething troubles SL-10 is pleagued with, SL-DL 1 went yet few more steps in the right direction. It is perhaps the best sounding of the whole family of linear tables that derived from the original SL-10 - in stock, unmodified form. It is also the only one in the line without quartz speed regulation - it has strobe on the lower platter rim visible through usual mirror arangement. This feature makes it appealing to those who might want vary the speed for some reason , like musicians. And those who are haunted by the notion that direct drive hunts for speed all the time, especially with quartz control. The time constant with which SL-DL1 does it is very well chosen and it is absolutely nothing wrong with its speed once the whole thing stabilizes in temperature - it may run a bit slower or faster than dead zero speed selected for a half or so hour from the cold start, but a really small correction of the speed control potentiometer takes care of that.

 

This sample came off ebay and was from the start meant for one of my friends. It came packed astonishingly well - in fact better than original packaging.

 

 

dedicated mat between two newspapers

 

styrofoam pieces CUT TO SIZE in order to secure the position of the TT during transport preventing possibility of the demage to the maximum

 

 

TT wrapped into usual food film - preventing scratches, offering the last protection in unhappy possibility of the package is subjected to misture or rain.

 

 

The only thing I did not like about packaging - lid secured to the plinth with tape.

 

 

The way to SLOWLY peel off remove tape - if you are careful and lucky, there will be no residue or even paint removal that can happen.

 

 

SL-DL 1 without the dedficated mat

 

 

Lighting sources underneath the platter TT uses to establish what type of record is on the platter and automatically adjusts for speed and size of the record for 7, 10 and 12 inch records - it is manually adjustable for odd combinations, like 33 1/3 RPM single and 45 RPM maxi single

 

This particular sample was bought defective. Given my vast experience with these turntables, nothing to worry about. They are actually very tough to knock out for good.

 

The most common defect or failure is that the linear arm, built into the lid , does not move at all or hangs at some point or does not travel past certain point, making playback impossible. The culprit is always somewhere here

 

Here is motor that drives the larger pulley through the belt missing on this pic that drives the worm that drives the cogwheel that drives the thread line that actually drives the arm trolley. This belt can be torn, can become too loose, can get glued to either pulley, can get greasy - in short, it is the usual troublemaker. But in this case, motor that drives the arm mechanism in order to keep it parallel to the groove was dead - no motion at all, belt itself being OK. It is kind rare, but not impossible - the TT must have stood unused for real long time, during which the oil in the motor bearing must have dried, seizing the motion. This sample could be unlocked with finger force - but I can remember one that required pliers to do it . If it is that stuck, please use some rubber or leather around the brass pulley on the motor and pliers - you do not want to demage the pulley. If seizure occurs, I always oil the axle properly and let the motor run without the belt attached ( it runs at high speed in the outward direction only for the travel of the arm, which takes about 7 seconds, as at the end of the travel is switch that cuts the motor ) FOR AT LEAST HALF AN HOUR - which should take care of the trouble in the forseeable future.

 

 

Here the belt in place on well oiled and run-in motor. You can see the remnants of the original yellowish grease 30 or so years old - it has to be cleaned off and replaced with fresh one.

 

 

Here the entire pick up arm drive system ( without the drive belt )

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post #1412 of 3359

heres a picture of the platter and close up of how motor is mounted to turntable analogsurviver,iam thinking of changed arm maybe in the future?

post #1413 of 3359
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post

The partial story of 

 

 

                                                              The Sleeping Beauty

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

It is the Technics SL-DL 1 linear tracking direct drive turntable. A direct descendant of the SL-7, in normal footprint size, with which it does share most of its vital components, such as direct drive motor and pick up arm, which are identical for the two. SL-7 itself rectified many of the terminal teething troubles SL-10 is pleagued with, SL-DL 1 went yet few more steps in the right direction. It is perhaps the best sounding of the whole family of linear tables that derived from the original SL-10 - in stock, unmodified form. It is also the only one in the line without quartz speed regulation - it has strobe on the lower platter rim visible through usual mirror arangement. This feature makes it appealing to those who might want vary the speed for some reason , like musicians. And those who are haunted by the notion that direct drive hunts for speed all the time, especially with quartz control. The time constant with which SL-DL1 does it is very well chosen and it is absolutely nothing wrong with its speed once the whole thing stabilizes in temperature - it may run a bit slower or faster than dead zero speed selected for a half or so hour from the cold start, but a really small correction of the speed control potentiometer takes care of that.

 

This sample came off ebay and was from the start meant for one of my friends. It came packed astonishingly well - in fact better than original packaging.

 

 

dedicated mat between two newspapers

 

styrofoam pieces CUT TO SIZE in order to secure the position of the TT during transport preventing possibility of the demage to the maximum

 

 

TT wrapped into usual food film - preventing scratches, offering the last protection in unhappy possibility of the package is subjected to misture or rain.

 

 

The only thing I did not like about packaging - lid secured to the plinth with tape.

 

 

The way to SLOWLY peel off remove tape - if you are careful and lucky, there will be no residue or even paint removal that can happen.

 

 

SL-DL 1 without the dedficated mat

 

 

Lighting sources underneath the platter TT uses to establish what type of record is on the platter and automatically adjusts for speed and size of the record for 7, 10 and 12 inch records - it is manually adjustable for odd combinations, like 33 1/3 RPM single and 45 RPM maxi single

 

This particular sample was bought defective. Given my vast experience with these turntables, nothing to worry about. They are actually very tough to knock out for good.

 

The most common defect or failure is that the linear arm, built into the lid , does not move at all or hangs at some point or does not travel past certain point, making playback impossible. The culprit is always somewhere here

 

Here is motor that drives the larger pulley through the belt missing on this pic that drives the worm that drives the cogwheel that drives the thread line that actually drives the arm trolley. This belt can be torn, can become too loose, can get glued to either pulley, can get greasy - in short, it is the usual troublemaker. But in this case, motor that drives the arm mechanism in order to keep it parallel to the groove was dead - no motion at all, belt itself being OK. It is kind rare, but not impossible - the TT must have stood unused for real long time, during which the oil in the motor bearing must have dried, seizing the motion. This sample could be unlocked with finger force - but I can remember one that required pliers to do it . If it is that stuck, please use some rubber or leather around the brass pulley on the motor and pliers - you do not want to demage the pulley. If seizure occurs, I always oil the axle properly and let the motor run without the belt attached ( it runs at high speed in the outward direction only for the travel of the arm, which takes about 7 seconds, as at the end of the travel is switch that cuts the motor ) FOR AT LEAST HALF AN HOUR - which should take care of the trouble in the forseeable future.

 

 

Here the belt in place on well oiled and run-in motor. You can see the remnants of the original yellowish grease 30 or so years old - it has to be cleaned off and replaced with fresh one.

 

 

Here the entire pick up arm drive system ( without the drive belt )

 

 

Never would have expected linear tracking love on here.

post #1414 of 3359

PART 2 OF THE SLEEPING BEAUTY

 

 

Platter removed. Absolutely necessary in order to get the main/motor bearing oiled. Remember, it is about 30 years old. Removal of the platter is a bit awkward, if you are doing it for the first time, I strongly reccomend you a pair of adittional helping hands. Do not try to pull the platter upwards - its cone is VERY stuck after all this time. Pair of helping hands should hold the TT UPSIDE DOWN, while you tap the spindle with the plastic handle of a screwdriver or similar - with the other hand catching it the second it becomes loose due to gravity. Needless to say, remove the stylus/cartridge for safekeeping while removing the platter.

 

 

A bit of excess oil is better than none ...

 

 

THE STAR OF THE SHOW - THE PICK UP ARM  SL series is characterized by this pick up arm - its effective lenght is 115 mm, which is a in stark

contrast with 9 inch or more of the common pivoted arms. It has FAR lower inertia than an 9 or more inch counterpart - because INERTIA increases WITH THE DISTANCE FROM FULCRUM SQUARED. The inertia is about the most maligned and not correctly understood word in audio vocabulary - it gets mixed up with tracking force, effective mass, etc - and although it is related to them, none of them describes it. Inertia is something all objects have, it is the resistance they show against movement. It is some constant that is dependant on the form, but it always increases with the distance from the fulcrum squared - this is why the Technics SL linear arm has ONE FOURTH of inertia compared to the usual 9 inch 230 mm arm. This means it takes only one fourth of force required to move the stylus on the SL arm across the warp on the record as it does with conventional arm. WHICH TRANSLATES INTO MORE CONSTANT DYNAMIC TRACKING FORCE - WHICH TRANSLATES ULTIMATELY INTO LOWER DISTORTION - USING THE SAME CARTRIDGE OR STYLUS.

 

It is not a true linear tracking arm - it is a pivoted arm whose pivot gets adjusted by servo circuit governing the pulley belt etc shown above. There are those who insist on parallel down to the molecule level - which usually results in air bearing arm with extremely low gap requiring extremely precise manufacture with the matching price tag attached. 5 figures. And usually such arms are longer and have consequently only insignificantly lower inertia in the vertical plane than pivoted brethern - by couple of %, not 4 times as the SL arm. I own and use Eminent Technology ET 2 that is the lowest priced good air bearing linear tracking arm - and with certain cartridges, there is appreciable gain in performance to be had from Technics SL arm. Let alone when compared to pivoted arms - for all practical purposes, lateral tracking error of SL arm remains below 0.2 degree ( EXCEPT FOR HEAVILY OFF CENTER PRESSED RECORDS ) - and that is less than you can reasonably expect your phono cartridge stylus to be aligned to. In short - negligible. In real world conditions, with records that are anything but flat, SL arm is capable of approximating the theorethically desirable conditions for the stylus better than almost anything else - if and when cost is concerned, it stands alone.

 

Obviously, it is a P - Mount T4P arm. Which means it takes only P mount cartridges that per standard have 6.0 gram weight and specified connector and dimensions. They SHOULD have the specified compliance - and here things begin to get dicey. There were VERY high end p-mount carts back in the day - how about Ortofon TMC-200 with fine line stylus on boron cantilever and 0.09 mV ( YOU READ RIGHT, BELOW 0.1 mV ) - but try as they might, compliance is too low in this otherwise superb cart to be really suitable for SL arm. Technics own original cart that came on the SL-10, the mighty EPC 310 MC, was and still is one of the very best carts ever made - regardless of mounting option. And one of the very very very very best carts, if not actually the very best of them all, was Technics EPC P100CMK4 - the lowest effective mass ever achieved with response past 120 kHz.

These are in extremely short supply and hard to get, with correspondingly matching price.

 

Today, the selection of p-mount carts is limited, but there are enough currently produced quality styli that are available for the p-mount carts as well as currently produced p-mount carts that getting a decent sounding p-mount is not Mission Impossible.

post #1415 of 3359

I actually have the original Clearaudio Emotion, with the Grado Sonata Reference 1.  I also used to have a Virtuoso Wood.  While the Virtuoso may be better from a technical standpoint, I find the Grado to give that extra warmth to the sound that the Emotion seems to slightly take away.  So if you're thinking it sounds a bit dry now, I'd suggest sticking with the Grado for a bit.  I personally think the Grado sounds incredible; the way it resolves tone and presents a nice "thick" harmonic sound is fantastic.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dosley01 View Post

New week, new TT!  Hello Marantz, good bye Music Hall.  Actually I'm not 100% sold on the TT15-S1, it's coming off a bit dry sounding compared to my Music Hall MMF-7 but it might just be setup or just getting used to the cleaner backgrounds.  I'm still debating on opening up the Clearaudio Virtuoso Wood cartridge but I've been so happy with my Grado Sonata that I think I'd be better off just selling the Virtuoso. 

post #1416 of 3359

Part 3 of the SLEEPING BEAUTY

 

P Mount is in theory answer to all the prayers one might have regarding cart and arm adjustments. VTF, geometry, compatibility regarding compliance, etc, etc, etc - with removal and retightening of a single screw per cartridge change IF PERFECTION IN REAL WORLD WAS POSSIBLE - we all know this not to be the case, so p-mount can be a pretty nasty can of worms. PLURAL. 

 

It is almost never exactly 6.0 g heavy. It almost never has stylus tip at the precise point as per standard - meaning geometry alignment will be slightly off in case the arm has perfect geometry to begin with. It can appreciably differ from the compliance - and compliance spec for p- mount is about the closest equivalent to snake legs in practice. The biggest offender and defect lies in on first glance trivial thing - the azimuth. Just because it SHOULD be perpendicular to the record surface does not mean it will be so in practice. Each and every component has its tolerances - and they add up or cancel each one out. The cartridge itself has following sources of error:

 

1. the stylus itself

2. the alignment of the stylus relative to the cantilever

3. the alignment of the generator to the cantilever

4. the alignment of 1-3 to the cartridge body and its mounting platform. 

 

It is the same for any type of cartridge mount system. Catch (22 - an appropriate number we shall see further down in text ) is the fact that p mount does not assume provision for ANY adjustment - in some cases not even VTF. For p mount, you can add to the azimuth errors

 

5. arm internal p mpount female connector ( will always be slightly oo either side )

6. arm azimuth regarding its mounting platform.

 

The only way it is possible to get azimuth right in a p mount table is through matching the arm with say an error of x degrees to a cartridge with an exactly opposite - x degree error. Since azimuth for really good performance ( separation above 35 dB symetrical for both channels ) is within one third of a degree in angle - this is no easy task. It sure is handy to have 22 turntables or arms and 22 cartridges - it is possible to mix and match until even the lowest grade of matching will yield quite an acceptable result. It is possible to get a few perfect results - I menaged to achieve a perfect symetry for the SLEEPING BEAUTY - separation in excess of 38 dB, symetrical, alignment so precise that even at 20 kHz the output from the cartridge was almost within the scope trace for both channels. Test record JVC TRS 1007. The entire contents of the CBS STR 112 record was tracked with aplomb - not a common practice, even with $$$ equipment. 

 

 

The sting that really works as it should

 

What follows is the pics you have probably not seen yet - how to measure VTF on Technics SL linear arm, how to use electronic stylus cleaner etc-

 

 

The logic built into Technics SL table arm combo prevents anything that does not satisfy criteria - if for any reason TT  does not attain correct speed, it will not lower the arm to the record surface, and its arm  lift is actualy a spring that only under signal from reco0rd size and speed detectors being right actuates an electromagnet that lowers the arm and stylus into the groove. Actual measurement of VTF is of course not possible under such conditions. The same goes for stylus cleaning if the method involves lowering the stylus to the cleaning device with normal VTF. On the first generation of SL linears, the easiest solution is to use a piece of the machined wooden toothpick and wedging it into the lifting mechanism as shown in the pic above and in close up below

 

It will give you the opportunity to correctly measure the VTF and cleanj stylus if lowering is required.


Edited by analogsurviver - 3/9/13 at 7:29am
post #1417 of 3359
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsplice View Post

I actually have the original Clearaudio Emotion, with the Grado Sonata Reference 1.  I also used to have a Virtuoso Wood.  While the Virtuoso may be better from a technical standpoint, I find the Grado to give that extra warmth to the sound that the Emotion seems to slightly take away.  So if you're thinking it sounds a bit dry now, I'd suggest sticking with the Grado for a bit.  I personally think the Grado sounds incredible; the way it resolves tone and presents a nice "thick" harmonic sound is fantastic.

 

 


Thank you!  You confirmed what I had gathered from looking around.  I had a audio nirvana moment yesterday, and I think I finally got everything dialed in to a point where I can actually just listen instead of thinking about adjusting things.  I'm still stunned when I get to a silent part or lead in/out groove and everything is just dead quiet.  My Music Hall MMF-7 is definitely warmer sounding than the TT15 but I'm really learning to appreciate the blackness of the TT15.  I just hope the belt stretches a bit, mine is running fast at about 33.6 - 33.7.  I was thinking of trying it with my Music Hall Cruise Control which will accept AC motors up to 3 watts but the motor pulls 5 watts so I don't want to chance frying it.  I might try calling Roy at Music Hall and see what he thinks.  He'll probably come back with something along the lines of "Marantz?  What !@#$%^& crap, you need a Music Hall MMF- blankety blank."

post #1418 of 3359

Part 4 of the SLEEPING BEAUTY

 

 

Transcriptors Stylus Scales in close up action - 0.05 gram will deflect the bubble spirit level off the visible window ...

 

 

Electronic Stylus Cleaner in action on the SL-DL 1 - CARE HAS TO BE TAKEN NOT TO CLOSE THE LID WHICH CARRIES THE ARM FULLY - the thickness of the record cleaner is obviously more tha that of a LP and it is possible to exceed the free vertical arm travel, resulting in a possible demage to the stylus.

 

It is mandatory to position the arm where you want it in advance - by placing the record on the table and get the arm where required, lifting it up and UNPLUGGING TURNTABLE FROM THE MAINS. Then you use toothpick wedge and measure VTF, clean or whatever. NEVER work with TT in this way  under power - sooner or later you will do the uups - meaning your piggybank will get for one stylus lighter. The TT is smart - in the above pic you can see holes for sensors underneath, it will not start rotation or even lower the stylus if it does not have a record placed on the platter - if you disable lift and power does come up, arm will return to its starting rest position - dragging the stylus across the mat, most likely  sending it to ever hunting grounds.

 

So - a million dollar question - how does it sound ?

 

VERY difficult to give you a direct answer. It is an extremely complex machine, in a way it is the pinnacle of turntable design, it was made to price point, although SL-DL 1 is the best sounding of the bunch, a pretty basic Project RPM4 seen a couple of posts back can sonically make mincemeat out of STOCK unit. But this is an analogsirviver passion for the last 10 or so years, so read on the next part.

 

 

The only "normal" pic of this example of SL-DL 1 - prior to polishing its lid to perfection. The scratch on the black part of the lid is not so severe in real life as it is on the photo.

post #1419 of 3359

Part 5 of the SLEEPING BEAUTY

 

The Technics tables in this series, as well as others, can have lots of structural resonances. They generally tend to sound thin, with the lack of body, some would say that they lack balls. Place a better cartridge on them - you will compound the problem - the better the cart, the more annoying the shortcomings of the stock table. It goes to the SP 10 MKII level - unfortunately never heard the MKIII, which should be better - but MKII has its set of flaws generally comparable to the ones of SL-DL 1, although lesser in degree.

 

There are MANY internal changes in that SL-DL 1 in the photos - each and every one aimed at making the design mechanically quieter. It is not the Full Monty mod - far from it - yet it is the very first DD I ever heard to start sounding right. A check in the system of a friend with a very good SAFE ( Symetrical Air Friction Enclosure ) speakers who otherwise sells Project and VPI turntables using my mods of vintage Technics amplification confirmed what I heard with Stax Lambda Pro - this unassuming box is one of the world's greatest sounding TTs. It is quiet, it has impeccable speed, and it tracks and traces the information engraved in the grooves with hitherto unheard of precision. It sounds extremely stable, much like master tape - and it has unbelievable dynamic range. It does not sound light or without body - in fact, transients that come from this table have to be heard to be believed. It is perfectly capable of punching you in the stomach with bass - not many TTs regardless of price can do that. I was amazed that it does so well at low levels - as demonstrated with a guitar concerto by Giulani played by Pepe Romero on Philips - despite the fact that this one did not receive the outboard power supply that I otherwise consider mandatory. Outboard power supply lowers the noise levels in direct drive turntables so much that once experienced, it is really difficult to go back.

 

A word about suspension on this table. Original Technics rubber legs with springs leave too much to be desired - I replaced them with squash balls. I have used the least bouncy squash ball available - the Dunlop http://www.racquetsource.com/Articles.asp?ID=249 The Pro ( Double yellow dot ) - simply put into cavities original removed legs left behind. You have to wait say half an hour for the balls to conform to the shape - both the stability and isolation of the resulting turntable will improve. 

 

left hand front corner Dunlop double yellow dot squash ball

 

 

right hand front side corner Dunlop double yellow dot squash ball

post #1420 of 3359

Part 6 of the SLEEPING BEAUTY

 

Troughout the listening, a 0.3 mm thick carbon fibre mat http://www.ebay.de/itm/Black-Diamond-Carbon-LP-Mat-/350104300160?pt=DE_TV_Video_Audio_Sonstige&hash=item5183d7aa80 was used. This one is pricey, but ocasionally the seller puts up an auction starting at 1 euro.

This mat is worth whatever you will pay for it.

 

Here the pics of the very ATN440MLa stylus used on the SL-DL1

 

 

 

 

 

MICRO LINE ridge clearly visible

 

 

 

 

Sorry for not so clear pictures, but getting the thing in focus is time consuming and can result in an "oops" before you know it - do not want to trash a perfect sylus just for photo reasons.

post #1421 of 3359

Forget being out of focus I'm amazed you were able to get pictures like that in the first place

post #1422 of 3359

Part 7 of the SLEEPING BEAUTY

 

 

 

 

HERE YOU CAN SEE THE VERY CONTACT SURFACE WITH THE GROOVE OF THE MICRO LINE STYLUS - THE REFLECTED LIGHT LINE FOR THE RIGHT CHANNEL, ON ADJACENT SIDE THE SAME LINE SEEN AS DARKER SHADOW. SCANNING RADIUS OF 2.5 MICROMETERS

 

I can confirm that SLEEPING BEAUTY works very well with Grado P- Mount cartidges. It DOES NOT perform the dreaded Grado dance. I did peek a bit in the contemporary MMF 7 vs Marantz/Clearudio table with Grado Sonata and Clearaudio Virtuoso debate. Much the same can be said regarding Grado and AT carts on the modified SL-DL 1. Grado has, despite inferiour technicalities, a very musically appealing performance and much of its tracking and tracing problems are apreciably ameliorated by the SL linear arm. Hum remains the issue as with any other Grado application, but I did not find it objectionable enough to preclude recommendation.

 

I have for about 4-5 hours of music played by SL-DL1 as pictured recorded in DSD at 5.6 MHz on Korg MR1000 recorder. Files are LARGE - DSD at 5.6 MHz is 11 min audio = 1 GB. I hesitate to make them available, as the turntable is not yet a finished article and I do not know if it is legal to post recordings of LPs in such quality - do not want to infringe any copyrights etc. The sound of this table has analog resolution and almost the dynamic range of digital - here both attributes for both mediums are meant as positive. 

 

I will record some of the same tracks with completely stock SL-DL1 using the same type of cartridge/stylus through the same preamp and recorder for reference. 

 

Micro Line stylus  ATN440MLa in a linear arm will end up any debate regarding inner groove distortion - and the trackability of this combo means there will be no congestion during the finale of Mahler's Second Symphony. Or Keith Jarrett's Koeln Concerto that rarely gets played side 1 to the end on any turntable that has any issues at all.

 

440 is known to lean to the bright side - but that is less pronounced here than in other instalations I have heard. Electrical loading for the cartridge was approx 170-180 pF into 33 kohm - this is reasonably achievable with low capacitance arm cables and removed any additional capacitance at the phono input. 33 kohm damps the HF peak and extends the HF response and I find this load as the best among reasonably achievable.

 

This combination does not sound bright in a traditional sense of the word - but it will  definitely unearth so much detail hitherto unheard in the upper reaches that initially it might sound overwhelming - this is not mellow Shure sound for sure. We listened non stop for 5+ hours at concert levels, be it string quartet or Van Halen in full cry. There was not a hint of the listener fatigue - on the contrary, it was getting late and we had to finish the listening that would have otherwise progressed into the vee hours.

post #1423 of 3359
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post

 

 

The only "normal" pic of this example of SL-DL 1 - prior to polishing its lid to perfection. The scratch on the black part of the lid is not so severe in real life as it is on the photo.

 

Just biggrin.gif woke up! Now enjoying The Sleeping Beauty Series. I was unable to zoom in on the record label to learn what you were playing. Billy Preston "I Wrote A Simple Song?" Okay, got "Zoom" to work...I wasn't even close!


Edited by Silent One - 3/9/13 at 11:35am
post #1424 of 3359
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post

 

Just biggrin.gif woke up! Now enjoying The Sleeping Beauty Series. I was unable to zoom in on the record label to learn what you were playing. Billy Preston "I Wrote A Simple Song?" Okay, got "Zoom" to work...I wasn't even close!

http://www.discogs.com/Elkie-Brooks-Pearls-II/release/2526410 

 

B2 - killer version of Money with female vocal.

post #1425 of 3359
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post

 

Just biggrin.gif woke up! Now enjoying The Sleeping Beauty Series. I was unable to zoom in on the record label to learn what you were playing. Billy Preston "I Wrote A Simple Song?" Okay, got "Zoom" to work...I wasn't even close!

http://www.discogs.com/Elkie-Brooks-Pearls-II/release/2526410 

 

B2 - killer version of Money with female vocal.

 

404! Oh no! rolleyes.gif

That's ok! Curiosity will lead me to a YT vid, perhaps.

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