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Schiit Lyr - The tube rolling thread - Page 328  

post #4906 of 8735
Quote:
Originally Posted by HK_sends View Post

Please let me know how they sound...tongue.gif

 

Cheers!beerchug.gif

-HK sends


Will do, my friend. smile.gif

 

beerchug.gif

post #4907 of 8735

Ya might know this site already...

I found it fascinating 

 

http://www.shinjo.info/frank/vs.html

 

also

 

http://www.shinjo.info/frank/sheetsE.html


Edited by Iamnothim - 1/12/13 at 7:47pm
post #4908 of 8735

Here's a clean copy of the Philips date document

 

 

 

 

PhilipsCodeListAB-v9.pdf 78k .pdf file
post #4909 of 8735

hi i am going for  Schlitt Lyr Amp and bifrost Dac yet which Tube should i pick? i am looking for low-noise and Bright/fun Tube more like the AD8610ARZ opamp so which tube is the most similar to it? Thanks in advance ^^

post #4910 of 8735

This will be an adventure.

I just bought a B&K Dyna Jet 606 Vacuum Tube tester.

 

 

 

 

 

I confirmed it had a 9-pin mini socket and tests 6.3V

I went through the testing charts. It has:

6299, ECC88, E88CC, E188CC, 6DJ8, and a bunch of others.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/290843825748?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

 

I wanted a Heathkit TC-3 because it has all the assembly instructions and parts list for repairing it.  I lost it and went for this B&K

B&K is supposed to be a more professional brand like Hickock.

 

Still, he boat anchor factor is med-high.

I always wanted to learn how test circuits.  If it craps out I have a nice Fluke multimeter to try to repair it.

post #4911 of 8735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shini44 View Post

hi i am going for  Schlitt Lyr Amp and bifrost Dac yet which Tube should i pick? i am looking for low-noise and Bright/fun Tube more like the AD8610ARZ opamp so which tube is the most similar to it? Thanks in advance ^^

I'm not sure if I would call them bright, but I think any of the 1960's era Amperex Holland tubes sound really good on most musical genres. You can find sets starting around $50.00 and up. So, that would be a good starter NOS tube set.  I think the Mid-60's Bugle Boys are great tubes as are the orange globes and PQs. I don't have any 6DJ8 Telefunken tubes for my Lyr, but the Telefunken tubes that fit my Pan Am run on the brighter side, but not too bright.  However, I cannot say for sure if what is true for a Telefunken 6AK5 tube is also true for a 6DJ8.  I would probably start out with a set of Amperex Hollands and see what you think.

post #4912 of 8735

I like the TV7 testers, the D or E version. The 1st version isn't that well made. I have 2 Hickok 439C's, with one as new and they are fine but to get you to where you want to be, a transconductance testers like the TV-2 or 10 will do.

 

I am using some Soviet era 1984 6DJ8 types right now that I always found to could outdo all of my many nos Amperex, and I have around 150 and other tubes. So I don't know how you would find the type of 6DJ8 I am talking about. They are in an Amperex box and marked made in Gt. Britain but I know from experience they are Soviet. Very quiet, solid, excellent bass and refined highs.

post #4913 of 8735
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamato8 View Post

I like the TV7 testers, the D or E version. The 1st version isn't that well made. I have 2 Hickok 439C's, with one as new and they are fine but to get you to where you want to be, a transconductance testers like the TV-2 or 10 will do.

 

I am using some Soviet era 1984 6DJ8 types right now that I always found to could outdo all of my many nos Amperex, and I have around 150 and other tubes. So I don't know how you would find the type of 6DJ8 I am talking about. They are in an Amperex box and marked made in Gt. Britain but I know from experience they are Soviet. Very quiet, solid, excellent bass and refined highs.

You are my new best friend :)

I have decided to make tube testers my tertiary hobby, or the hobby, within the hobby, within the hobby.

I was just about to look for a tube tester Head-Fi thread when your post came through.  Is there one?

 

I did 45 minutes of extensive research before buying my Dyna Jet 606.  Yes Sir.

I lost a Heathkit one on eBay  I wanted it because a Heathkit lists all the parts and how to build it.  (I know everyone knows this...)

After I lost, I read a bit more and found the Heathkit wasn't all that great.  Not surprising. Plus you don't know who built it in the first place.  

 

So I picked up the B&K.   I know it's nowhere near the quality accuracy of a Hickock, but it's a nice place for me to start.  $160 delivered and estimating another $700 in parts to make it work right.  smile.gif  I hope not, but that's my track record on this kind of stuff.

 

Even though the thing "looks clean" you don't know what's behind the covers.  I'm just starting this.  I realize that I have to calibrate the thing

otherwise I have no clue if the test values are valid.  I know there's an RCA 6L6 calibration tube but I can't see how that helps me with 9 pin 6JD8's.

 

I'm going to have to learn how to read schematics, get some deoxit, learn to use my Fluke meter and on.   If I need buttons, components and such, I'm sure I can find it on mouser.com

 

Thanks for the comments 

post #4914 of 8735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iamnothim View Post

You are my new best friend :)

I have decided to make tube testers my tertiary hobby, or the hobby, within the hobby, within the hobby.

I was just about to look for a tube tester Head-Fi thread when your post came through.  Is there one?

 

I did 45 minutes of extensive research before buying my Dyna Jet 606.  Yes Sir.

I lost a Heathkit one on eBay  I wanted it because a Heathkit lists all the parts and how to build it.  (I know everyone knows this...)

After I lost, I read a bit more and found the Heathkit wasn't all that great.  Not surprising. Plus you don't know who built it in the first place.  

 

So I picked up the B&K.   I know it's nowhere near the quality accuracy of a Hickock, but it's a nice place for me to start.  $160 delivered and estimating another $700 in parts to make it work right.  smile.gif  I hope not, but that's my track record on this kind of stuff.

 

Even though the thing "looks clean" you don't know what's behind the covers.  I'm just starting this.  I realize that I have to calibrate the thing

otherwise I have no clue if the test values are valid.  I know there's an RCA 6L6 calibration tube but I can't see how that helps me with 9 pin 6JD8's.

 

I'm going to have to learn how to read schematics, get some deoxit, learn to use my Fluke meter and on.   If I need buttons, components and such, I'm sure I can find it on mouser.com

 

Thanks for the comments 


The 6L6 was used by Hickok to determine the basic settings of the tube and not the individual sockets, if they are working or not. The tester showing a correct setting for the 6L6 will show you the tester is on but that doesn't mean there might not be a problem with a selector switch or tube socket. There is no way you would want to invest more than 150 or so into the tester you got. You can pick up reconditioned and calibrated testers and no more work needs to be done but you want to make sure the seller is reputable. I keep 2 6L6's with me and other calibration tubes, just to check out the sockets. Some testers, earlier, didn't do well with the 6DJ8 because of its requirements and will test all over the place. The D and E version of the TV7 accounted for this. Often what is needed is ferrite rings on each wire coming off of the socket for the 9 pin, which tames this. The later testers had these and some earlier ones have been modified by adding these inexpensive rings.

 

Remember a tester just gives you a number. It doesn't really tell you how a tube will sound, and unless you access the circuit, if a tube is noisy. Also the number can be high or low but that doesn't always tell you how good a tube really is, testing wise. It is just a ballpark to get you there. Much testing gets you the experience needed.

post #4915 of 8735
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamato8 View Post


The 6L6 was used by Hickok to determine the basic settings of the tube and not the individual sockets, if they are working or not. The tester showing a correct setting for the 6L6 will show you the tester is on but that doesn't mean there might not be a problem with a selector switch or tube socket. There is no way you would want to invest more than 150 or so into the tester you got. You can pick up reconditioned and calibrated testers and no more work needs to be done but you want to make sure the seller is reputable. I keep 2 6L6's with me and other calibration tubes, just to check out the sockets. Some testers, earlier, didn't do well with the 6DJ8 because of its requirements and will test all over the place. The D and E version of the TV7 accounted for this. Often what is needed is ferrite rings on each wire coming off of the socket for the 9 pin, which tames this. The later testers had these and some earlier ones have been modified by adding these inexpensive rings.

 

Remember a tester just gives you a number. It doesn't really tell you how a tube will sound, and unless you access the circuit, if a tube is noisy. Also the number can be high or low but that doesn't always tell you how good a tube really is, testing wise. It is just a ballpark to get you there. Much testing gets you the experience needed.

Thank for the detailed reply.  I'm getting my brain around it.

I understand there is not a test for sonic signature.  I had hoped for noise and/or micro phonics.  But that's OK. I got it for fun. Learning something new and determining if a tube is degrading. Connecting the dots, as it were. Learning Triodes and heaters and such.

 

I'm restating your explanation so I understand.  You set the tester up for the 6L6 slot, plug in the reference tube, press test and you should get a reading that the tube is .... I would think pegged good. Any other reading indicates how far off your tester is....And that was my biggest question.  Just because a 6L6 slot is good doesn't mean 6DJ8 slot is good.  As you pointed out the 6JD8 socket is on another circuit path with different cap's and rotary switch settings. 

 

Thanks again.

post #4916 of 8735

The 6L6 has a set value on it as it is tested on another Hickok tester. Say it is a 6L6 for a 439C and tested on a very calibrated 439C. You then calibrate to get the same number as on that calibrating tube. I calibrated most of my own testers so I have other numbers for the 6L6 for other testers. I also have a 6SN7, 6DJ8 and a few others with known values to check out everything. Sometimes the 6DJ8 will show that a tester will test one half of it fine but the other side totally off. I know that the other half is oscillating, so ferrite rings are needed on the wires. I like my TV7's (three), TV10 (never worked until I got it so even though it was made in the 1950's, inside it is like new), 2 439c's and a few others. Too many but I got on a rampage about 12 years ago. I carry a TV7 with me now when traveling and my calibrating tubes. The nice thing about the TV7, TV10 and 439C is that they have pots so you can easily calibrate them, well if you know what you are doing. Sometimes a resistor is fried but mine are all up to par now.

post #4917 of 8735

Hey all,

I was wondering what the use of socket savers are for... I thought they made replacing tubes easier, but the connection between the tube and socket saver is tighter than the socket saver to the lyr. Maybe I just made up the use of socket savers  completely in my head... anyone have any ideas?

 

Thanks.

post #4918 of 8735
Quote:
Originally Posted by thisthingz View Post

Hey all,

I was wondering what the use of socket savers are for... I thought they made replacing tubes easier, but the connection between the tube and socket saver is tighter than the socket saver to the lyr. Maybe I just made up the use of socket savers  completely in my head... anyone have any ideas?

 

Thanks.

They have an aesthetic appeal to some, they make the use of tube dampers easier and they make tube rolling easier for some. In the case of my Lyr, the connections are pretty tight so it makes a lot easier to have something to grab onto. Many also are using them for their purported original use, they roll new tubes into the socket savers (using a stick or something to hold it in place in the Lyr) so they don't wear out the sockets in the Lyr. Basically unnecessary, they have no discernible effect in sound quality. Just an investment in aesthetics mainly, with an added bonus of the features mentioned above.

post #4919 of 8735

which tube would be totally dead silent no matter the price ? the most important is no humming, buzzing, whinning, crackling, no microphonics at all, totally dead silent when there is no music playing on Lyr


Edited by magicman - 1/15/13 at 3:59am
post #4920 of 8735
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicman View Post

which tube would be totally dead silent no matter the price ? the most important is no humming, buzzing, whinning, crackling, no microphonics at all, totally dead silent when there is no music playing on Lyr

Sensitivity of the headphones your using is a big factor as far as noise on the lyr. Tubes that I thought to be silent on the lcd2, were noisey on an efficient can like the grado or d7000. That said if noise was the ONLY critera for choosing I would say go with newly made tubes, like the JJ's, Electro Harmonix 6922eh, or Genalex Gold Lions.
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