Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Safe listening volume on headphones
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Safe listening volume on headphones - Page 2

post #16 of 26

I started to listen to my newish Superlux for the last week and it has made my tinnitus way worse so stop listening to headphones for a while.  This didn't happen when I was on my Ultrasone all the time when I first got it

 

The S-logic thingy really helps because it is much easier on your ears and i think I might have to stick to Ultrasone brand in the future because of it.

post #17 of 26

This thread makes me really pay a lot of attention to my ears.

 

I've for a while now worried about them... its kind of funny how your hearing can vary day to day.

 

Also I think someone earlier was asking about if what they were doing was safe.. although not sure.

 

The truth is YMMV.. I am not trying to say that it is "ok" for anyone to blare music.. but, the truth is some people just need it a little louder than others.. (within reason) but, there is no "safe" way anyone can predict what is "safe" for you.

 

I saw on the news a doctor say "If the person next to you can sing along, your music is too loud" which although I am not a doctor.. is something I (to some large degree) agree with.. Earbuds leak sound like it is no bodies business. My mom for over 5 years would tell us to turn it down because, she could hear it across the room..

 

The shoe was put on the other foot when she got her Iphone 4 and I asked her "how loud is that?" and she realized something important... those cheapo earbud speakers bleed sound.

 

Now I will admit it depends on whats playing as to how easy it is to "sing along" at any given volume.depends on what is playing.. some things are more clear lyrically depending on band/whatever but,we could *always* hear the earbuds.

 

Now that we have all moved up to IEMs or quit using ipods.. bit of a different situation..

 

post #18 of 26

I have it like that because even though it says 45% on my netbook..it's more like barely above audible when in a quiet area.. I can hear my keys clacking on my laptop at 45% percent volume (my wave synth is literally at 5% - rockboxed my ipod) either way, I live in shanghai, so it's more of, i put it low enough to hear, but not loud enough so I can't hear the background (cars here are crazy)

 

Just for clarification, this is 45% on my computer and what I use on the go in a noisy area.

Headphone listening volumes.jpg

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MtnSloth View Post

The problem with this approach is that the assault to your hearing will exceed ambient noise - your music is not intrinsically less damaging than noise pollution.

 



 


Edited by crayonhead - 4/15/11 at 11:40pm
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tyoung8 View Post

The S-logic thingy really helps because it is much easier on your ears and i think I might have to stick to Ultrasone brand in the future because of it.

 

The whole S-Logic thing sends some of the sound to your outer ear rather than directly into the ear, which is what creates that sense of space but also makes it feel odd for some people. On the upside, it also means less direct pressure into the ear which is important if you have hearing damage.
http://www.ultrasone.com/index.php/en/company/technology/safer-hearing.html

 

post #20 of 26

Quote:Originally Posted by KingStyles 

"I constantly listen to music between 80-90 spl without any problems. Using the spl meter with the cardboard, you dont want to shove the spl meter in the hole, just flush with it. The sound still has to make it down your ear canal to the ear drum which will take a little bit off the spl. Just moving the meter just a hair away from the hole drops the spl rapidly. You might be sensitive to headphones or mayby your headphone setup is bright or has sibilance or something else in it which is causing the issue and not the actual sound level."

I also use a cardboard template for measuring SPL levels with my meter. However, I stick the probe 1/4" beyond the cardboard. I use a rubber band around the probe to ensure consistent results. The ear sits inside most around ears pads so putting the probe just at the hole in the template doesn't seem the most accurate way. I mostly listen at around 84db using pink noise.

post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armaegis View Post

The whole S-Logic thing sends some of the sound to your outer ear rather than directly into the ear, which is what creates that sense of space but also makes it feel odd for some people. On the upside, it also means less direct pressure into the ear which is important if you have hearing damage.

http://www.ultrasone.com/index.php/en/company/technology/safer-hearing.html

 

 

yeah the S-logic thing really works for me.  I listen to music quite loud and I always feel a bit of pressure after using headphone/iem.  But when I had the Ultrasone I was on it 24/7 and my ears didn't feel any different.  Not one bit of pressure... like I haven't used a headhone at all.  Then I started using my Superlux the same way and my ears are now *bleep*.  I am so annoyed the ringing in my ears have gone up by about 10 times.  arrghh.
 

 


Edited by tyoung8 - 4/16/11 at 8:04am
post #22 of 26

Hi there

 

Those interest may find this article by Tyll Hertsens very useful.

 

I've recently noticed that listening at db levels ~70db, before my acoustic reflex kicks in, to reduce ringing in my ears and provide a higher-quality listening experience.

post #23 of 26

A fun and quite accurate way of measuring your IEMs and HPs is to get the App called Awareness! by Etymotic. It's main intention is to use the Mic feature on a HF3 or MC3 and bring in sounds above a specific dB for the user to hear what's making the noise like a person or a car. However, I couldn't care less about the Mic feature and I only use it for measuring the dB on my IEMs and HPs. Mine's always around 80-90dB with 100 dB when Hi-Hats and big bass is prominent.

post #24 of 26

There's also a free app by Ultimate Ears called UE SPL.

post #25 of 26
Hahahaha UE vs Etymotic! I'm a Ety fanboy so i'll stick with the Ety App! Haha
post #26 of 26
I've just recently experienced this exact same thing! Mild tinnitus even though I listen between 60-70dB (though I tested with an SPL app, but it seemed accurate with my other tests). I work in a restaurant and certain sounds (like people violently stacking plates) is ear-piercing as well. I mean it was never pleasant but it feels worse now. It's made me quite sad as I was just starting to seriously get into audiophilism and I'd just bought a JDS Labs C5D.

Which headphones do you use? I've been using the PSB M4U 1s. However I was using SoundMAGIC HP100s briefly beforehand and found that after using them on a couple of occasions I'd experience a bizarre sensation in my ears. It was like waves of whomness. If that doesn't make sense, I guess I could describe it as the echo of my heart being in my ears, only it wasn't linked to my heart.

Anyway, I'm not sure that had anything to do with giving me tinnitus. I've read that hearing damage is cumulative, and I have listened to headphones very loud in the past without thinking about it. My parents took me to a fair few gigs when I was a kid as well... I can't tear myself away from my music, though so I've resorted to listening at extremely low levels. Glad to hear that improved your tinnitus, OP. I'll have to look into those Ultrasones as well.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Headphones (full-size)
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Safe listening volume on headphones