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How does this 3D sound demonstration work?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

http://ccgi.bluerabbit.plus.com/virtualbarbershop/

 

I'm curious, even with IEM's the 3D soundstage is there. I remember hearing this a couple years ago and I was reaaally amazed by its 3D presentation, simply stunning...it sounds so real. >_<

 

Even knowing how this works, using 2 microphones (similar to a 3D photo with 2 lenses?), why don't recording studios use this when recording their music?

 

Edit: I found another 3D audio illusion demonstration using a matchbox. In this demonstration it has not only has a left and right 3D soundstage, but also a vertical soundstage as well.


Edited by miceblue - 3/30/11 at 8:57am
post #2 of 18
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binaural_recording
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:


Ooh I see. Thanks for the link!

 

post #4 of 18
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LFF View Post

See here as well:

 

http://www.head-fi.org/forum/thread/490085/the-wonderful-world-part-i


Oh wow, thanks for the link, that cleared up my questions. :)

 

post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post




Oh wow, thanks for the link, that cleared up my questions. :)

 

biggrin.gif Happy to see that!
 

 

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

I know this is an old thread, but if I were to purchase a pair of binaural microphones, say something like these:

http://www.soundprofessionals.com/cgi-bin/gold/category/110/mics

 

How would I go about actually interfacing with these? Would I need special software? How are these affordable microphones different from the expensive dummy heads per se?

 

I don't know how many of you are familiar with Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) but there are some pretty awesome uploaders who use binaural microphones to record their audio.

 

Without posting any "creepy" videos, I think these 2 videos are pretty "normal" and demonstrate the binaural audio.

 


Edited by miceblue - 6/19/13 at 3:02pm
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

I know this is an old thread, but if I were to purchase a pair of binaural microphones, say something like these:

http://www.soundprofessionals.com/cgi-bin/gold/category/110/mics

 

How would I go about actually interfacing with these? Would I need special software? How are these affordable microphones different from the expensive dummy heads per se?

Interfacing?  You would plug them into a compatible recording device.  No special software needed, just record away.  It's hard to tell from the web page what recorders they would work well with, you might contact the company.  They differ from the expensive dummy head binaural mics significantly.  Besides price, they are designed to clip to something, perhaps a hat or pair of glasses that you would wear.  A real binaural head has the mics embedded into a molded pinna (outer ear) in the actual ear canal. The pinna figures significantly in directional hearing. The cheap clip mics won't have a pinna around them, and certainly wouldn't be embedded into your ear canal.  The result will be recordings with only partial binaural effect.  Probably still worth playing with for $59, though.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

I don't know how many of you are familiar with Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) but there are some pretty awesome uploaders who use binaural microphones to record their audio.

I had to google ASMR.  It's undocumented, and controversial.  Wouldn't put much stock in it.  The term was introduced in early 2010 on Facebook by the person that made up the term.  

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaddie View Post

Besides price, they are designed to clip to something, perhaps a hat or pair of glasses that you would wear.  A real binaural head has the mics embedded into a molded pinna (outer ear) in the actual ear canal. The pinna figures significantly in directional hearing. The cheap clip mics won't have a pinna around them, and certainly wouldn't be embedded into your ear canal.  The result will be recordings with only partial binaural effect.  Probably still worth playing with for $59, though.

 

The pictures on the site show how the microphones are intended to be used, the effects of the pinna are not bypassed, but the ear canal is:

 

 

Also, they have simple 1/8" stereo jack connectors and can be plugged into sound cards, but need a few V of DC voltage (which is usually present on PC microphone inputs).

post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by stv014 View Post

 

The pictures on the site show how the microphones are intended to be used, the effects of the pinna are not bypassed, but the ear canal is:

 

 

Also, they have simple 1/8" stereo jack connectors and can be plugged into sound cards, but need a few V of DC voltage (which is usually present on PC microphone inputs).

Ah.  I should scroll more.  The top 3 on the page linked don't show that picture, and don't come with the little white pieces, they come with what look like fairly painful clips.

post #11 of 18
I actually own those mics. They are quite comfortable to wear, but to get them to sound tonally correct when played back will require. DAW, a tone generator, and a match EQ unless you have headphones(IEM) that will measure with an opposing/compensating curve. good luck with that.. Diffusefield EQed headphones will be way too bright! They certainly do a good job with the 3D effect though and the closer you get to a balanced sound, the better it becomes.
post #12 of 18
Or just get a Smyth realiser and all your music is binaural
post #13 of 18
They are unfortunately difficult to carry around.
post #14 of 18
Quote:

Originally Posted by jaddie View Post

 

I had to google ASMR.  It's undocumented, and controversial.  Wouldn't put much stock in it.  The term was introduced in early 2010 on Facebook by the person that made up the term.  

It's documented and not too controversial - that is, no one out there is doubting that some people get tingling sensations because of some sensory input. It's just not science. ASMR proponents cling to the hope that someday their ideas might be validated by the scientific community and so they went ahead and picked out a pretentious and meaningless medical-sounding term for their hobby. Kinda like ASECR, the Autonomous Sensory Electrical Conductor Response experienced by well equipped audiophiles with gilded pinnae.

post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stv014 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaddie View Post

Besides price, they are designed to clip to something, perhaps a hat or pair of glasses that you would wear.  A real binaural head has the mics embedded into a molded pinna (outer ear) in the actual ear canal. The pinna figures significantly in directional hearing. The cheap clip mics won't have a pinna around them, and certainly wouldn't be embedded into your ear canal.  The result will be recordings with only partial binaural effect.  Probably still worth playing with for $59, though.

 

The pictures on the site show how the microphones are intended to be used, the effects of the pinna are not bypassed, but the ear canal is:

 

 

Also, they have simple 1/8" stereo jack connectors and can be plugged into sound cards, but need a few V of DC voltage (which is usually present on PC microphone inputs).

Oh nice, I didn't see those earlier. That might provide a better binaural experience since they are in the position of your ears. The hook things remind me of the Bose earphones.

 

When recording with binaural microphones, I'm guessing the placement of the microphones makes a difference? (i.e. microphones 1 meter apart will sound different from microphones 15 cm apart)

 

I was planning to get a set just to play with, nothing too professional. Perhaps I can record something and replace the audio with the binaural recording to allow a better listening experience (e.g. recording fireworks since July 4 is coming up).

 

 

As for ASMR, I do get tingly sensations when listening to crinkly sounds or scratching (e.g. writing on a blackboard with chalk). Binaurally recorded ASMR videos around the internet seem to increase the sensation maybe because they sound more realistic to me.

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