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ROLAND CS-10EM - Binaural field recording

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hello - I'm experimenting with binaural recording atm and already have electret condenser mics & getting good results but have been researching the Roland CS-10RM's for some clandestine recording at concerts etc. I've read and listened to reviews and recordings on other sites and am so far impressed. I'm just looking for any valuable insight from any binaural headfiers who may have used these mics. Thanks for reading.
Edited by CARRION FEAST - 3/14/11 at 5:56pm
post #2 of 6

I just picked up a set of binaural microphones myself:  http://www.soundprofessionals.com/cgi-bin/gold/item/MS-TFB-2

I tried them on my last trip and I'm quite happy with the results.  I love how unobtrusive the process is- not like shooting still photos or video.  You just put them on and walk around!  But it didn't take long to figure out that there were some definite dos and don'ts.  For example, it's better to try not to turn your head so much while recording, and you should try to avoid the wind as much as possible.

 

I'm using mine with a Sony PCM-M10 recorder and recording at CD quality (44.1/16).  I noticed on a few occasions that I would pick-up a faint buzz that sounded like some sort of interference from another wireless device (just a guess).  I haven't been able to reproduce the buzz; so I'm not sure if it was some sort of external interference or I was thinking that maybe it was the microphones themselves.  Perhaps they aren't receiving adequate power or the shielding on the cable is poor.  So I am considering trying out the Roland microphones.  The ones I have are over the ear which means they have almost no microphonics; but they can be a little hard to put in.  The Rolands look like they're easy to put in just like IEMs.  But I do worry about microphonics and I hear it's not good to monitor while you're recording- which I won't do anyway.  That's the other good thing about the microphones I have- they're so small and they do not completely block your ear canal so you can hear almost like normal.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mkubota1 View Post

I just picked up a set of binaural microphones myself:  http://www.soundprofessionals.com/cgi-bin/gold/item/MS-TFB-2

I tried them on my last trip and I'm quite happy with the results.  I love how unobtrusive the process is- not like shooting still photos or video.  You just put them on and walk around!  But it didn't take long to figure out that there were some definite dos and don'ts.  For example, it's better to try not to turn your head so much while recording, and you should try to avoid the wind as much as possible.

 

I'm using mine with a Sony PCM-M10 recorder and recording at CD quality (44.1/16).  I noticed on a few occasions that I would pick-up a faint buzz that sounded like some sort of interference from another wireless device (just a guess).  I haven't been able to reproduce the buzz; so I'm not sure if it was some sort of external interference or I was thinking that maybe it was the microphones themselves.  Perhaps they aren't receiving adequate power or the shielding on the cable is poor.  So I am considering trying out the Roland microphones.  The ones I have are over the ear which means they have almost no microphonics; but they can be a little hard to put in.  The Rolands look like they're easy to put in just like IEMs.  But I do worry about microphonics and I hear it's not good to monitor while you're recording- which I won't do anyway.  That's the other good thing about the microphones I have- they're so small and they do not completely block your ear canal so you can hear almost like normal.

Thanks for the reply, I've looked at those mic's & was curious about their sound quality. I ended up getting the Rolands & have a Sony PCM-M10 as well and have been using them for a few weeks now - I've been recording at 24bit 48KHZ (after much research) and using manual leveling with some really great results. They pair up really well with the Sony and have an excellent range, my only concern is the bass sometimes (I tried the low-cut filter but felt it removed too much background- esp when recording outside), but that's only really a problem when there's a construction site or low flying planes etc nearby, so I'm just more picky about when & where I record. Overall I recommend it, some of the recordings I've made are surprisingly good for the set-up, better than alot of samples I've heard. The biggest problem so far has been wind as you said, the Rolands are pretty sensitive to even a light breeze, but again it comes down to picking the right time & place, also I found that setting the recording level so that the loudest sound hits around -10 to -5 or 6dB stops any clipping & got some great storm recordings. I'm thinking now that I might revisit the sound professional's site, they have some pretty cool mics, I'm pretty certain that I'm addicted to this for a while now biggrin.gif
post #4 of 6

I tried the low-cut filter too.  While it may have cut some wind noise (inside subway stations), I think it took away too much from the recording.  The low frequencies that these microphones pick up is pretty amazing and it definitely adds to the 'realness' of the recording.  They sell windscreens for the mics, but they look a little odd and take away some of the stealth factor when wearing them.  I have to play with my recorder a little bit more and try different controls and settings.  It's definitely a fun toy and project to work on and relatively cheap compared to half of the stuff around here.  Although like anything I suppose you can go crazy and get a PCM-D1 and some custom microphones.  biggrin.gif

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mkubota1 View Post

I tried the low-cut filter too.  While it may have cut some wind noise (inside subway stations), I think it took away too much from the recording.  The low frequencies that these microphones pick up is pretty amazing and it definitely adds to the 'realness' of the recording.  They sell windscreens for the mics, but they look a little odd and take away some of the stealth factor when wearing them.  I have to play with my recorder a little bit more and try different controls and settings.  It's definitely a fun toy and project to work on and relatively cheap compared to half of the stuff around here.  Although like anything I suppose you can go crazy and get a PCM-D1 and some custom microphones.  biggrin.gif



The best way to cut down on wind noise is to use a dead cat. Not a real non-living cat but a screen called a dead cat. Depending on your microphone, you can make a dead cat rather stealthy and discrete and still have amazing recordings. A low-cut filter gets rid of too much information at times and isn't the best option to use. If you are actually wearing the mics like IEM's, I would suggest you make a dead cat that looks like ear muffs. wink_face.gif

post #6 of 6

Hey guys, i was wondering if you could offer me a bit of advice, im torn between buying either the sound professionals MS-TFB-2 binaural mics or the Roland cs10em's as i noticed both have been mentioned on here i was just wondering if anyone could offer a comparison im going to use them for location recording and sound design mostly but may take them along to a few local gigs as well

 

any advice you could offer would be greatly appreciated

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