Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Electronic Music Exchange (House, DnB, Dubstep, etc.)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Electronic Music Exchange (House, DnB, Dubstep, etc.) - Page 402

post #6016 of 6030
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakeT View Post

 

Warning, soap-box rant coming:

 

Having acknowledged that, I wanted to point out some personal biases/feelings I have on the ridiculous categorization, subcategorization, sub-sub categorization, that takes place within the electronic music genre.......   namely, I personally detest the over-categorizing that takes place within the electronic music genre.

 

I find the labels used to categorize the types of electronic music to be nonsensical and practically useless (IDM, for example).  To newcomers, the sheer number of categories must be overwhelming.  I don't like placing category labels on music because I view them as boundaries/rules, which strangle the soul of the music itself. I really wish these labels did not exist.  I know many may disagree but that's my two cents.  Perhaps it is something in me that doesn't like being bound by rules, whereas others like these labels in order to make sense of what they are hearing.  I dunno.

 

+1 So many pointless sub-genres have been spawned and abandoned over the years - 'Wonky' is/was a particular bugbear of mine. It seemed to come about a couple of years ago to describe releases by Architeq, Himuro, Jamie Vex'd, Hudson Mohwake etc. - but what a useless term. It's a lazy way of (unnecessarily) categorizing music that was hard to categorize due its unconventional nature. I'm not a fan of the more recent 'EDM' either, which strikes me as something of a tautology. I prefer the catch-all Electronica for stuff that doesn't fall into meaningful genres like House, Techno, DnB - don't see a need to subdivide any further.

 

IDM obviously arose out of the AI-era Warp days, to differentiate the new sit-down-and-listen sound from more club-oriented electronic music of the past, but it's not a label the artists themselves ever felt comfortable with. Aphex had this to say on it: "I just think it's really funny to have terms like that. It's basically like saying 'this is intelligent and everything else is stupid'. It's really nasty to everyone else's music. It makes me laugh."


Edited by WraithApe - Yesterday at 3:55 am
post #6017 of 6030
Quote:
Originally Posted by WraithApe View Post
 

 

Big up for Todd Terje, great producer

 

Agreed, It's Album Time is fantastic

post #6018 of 6030
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakeT View Post
 

 

 

Good info DecentLevi.  I've been fully immersed in the electronic music scene for many many years.  You are totally correct in your comments.  

 

Warning, soap-box rant coming:

 

Having acknowledged that, I wanted to point out some personal biases/feelings I have on the ridiculous categorization, subcategorization, sub-sub categorization, that takes place within the electronic music genre.......   namely, I personally detest the over-categorizing that takes place within the electronic music genre.

 

I find the labels used to categorize the types of electronic music to be nonsensical and practically useless (IDM, for example).  To newcomers, the sheer number of categories must be overwhelming.  I don't like placing category labels on music because I view them as boundaries/rules, which strangle the soul of the music itself. I really wish these labels did not exist.  I know many may disagree but that's my two cents.  Perhaps it is something in me that doesn't like being bound by rules, whereas others like these labels in order to make sense of what they are hearing.  I dunno.

 

To be clear DecentLevi, I know  you didn't create the labels and are just reporting the facts so this is nothing against what you wrote as you are, of course, correct.  But in my opinion- screw these dumb labels.

 

Cheers

Hello, I'll start with a useful tip - from my experiences it should be no problem to "strongly disagree" with any points on Head-fi, just as long as your disagreement is done in a way that is constructive rather than offensive - and you had done it right so don't be too afraid to speak your mind! :happy_face1:

 

Personally, I think genre / sub-genre (style) labels are helpful overall with electronic music. I see your point where somebody new to the scene be overwhelmed if shown the entire list, but at least having a list of styles increases the likelyhood that they will chance across the style that suits them best - and once they do find the one they like, they can use the name of that style to find more similar artists.

 

I have also pondered the notion that labels are limiting from a creativity standpoint... and yes, indeed, too many (especially mainstream) electronic acts formulate their entire album based upon one super-small style concept, making all their songs sound almost the same. But I myself am an (aspiring) electronic music artist (name Modlift), and when I make a song I generally start out with a specific genre in mind then base the BPM, beat pattern, etc. off of that style but one thing that sets my method apart from others is that I feel free to give myself unlimited freedom to veer from that course, injecting experiments into the mix / breaking the traditional mix formula, etc. so that my end result may come out to more of a hybrid of genre's; and sometimes even uncategorizeable or experimental noize.

 

I think the golden rule of understanding the basic layout of electronic music, especially for newcomers would be this:

 

  •  DOWNTEMPO                   (generally 80 - 116 BPM "beats per minute")

  If you know you like artists like Tricky, Massive Attack, Bonobo etc. then you know you like downtempo and can find other similar trip hop and lounge/chillout styles. 
 

  • EDM                                                 (generally 118 - 136 BPM)

  If you know you like artists like Steve Aoki or Calvin Harris, then you like EDM. Similar tempo is Chemical Brothers and Fluke, which is more big-beat / electro style. If you like Skrillex and Avicii that you like slightly slower style called dubstep. 
 

  • TECHNO                                       (generally 138 - 190 BPM)

 If you like house artists like Todd Terrie then you would probably also like tech-house artists like Underworld. Likewise if you like Scooter then you will probably like the slightly faster styles of techno, hardstyle, trance and maybe even breakcore; although that can range from 224 - 300+ BPM.

 

  + (maybe) AMBIENT:                                  (0 BPM :basshead: )

If you like the slowest songs from the likes of FSOL, the Orb and Aphex Twin then you like the ambient style, and there is a new genre called power-ambient which is similar to experimental noize and minimal which have an endlessly growing underground scene as well.

 

So in my opinion if you can at least understand those 3 main styles then you're on your way to finding other more specific sub-genres under them.

post #6019 of 6030

Flako - Natureboy

 

 

 

 

Vessels - Dilate

 

 

 

 

Machinedrum - Vapor City Archives

 

 

 

 

Maelstrom - Zone 19: Adversarial Design EP

 

 


Edited by zachchen1996 - Yesterday at 4:57 am
post #6020 of 6030
Quote:
Originally Posted by zachchen1996 View Post

Agreed, It's Album Time is fantastic
I already stumbled across this album and love it. Really good.

Do you guys buy a lot of Cd's? I usually buy music digitally on Bandcamp, but am not finding a lot of electronica there. Lots on sound cloud that I like and want to buy, but don't see any option for buying flac.
post #6021 of 6030
Quote:
Originally Posted by bavinck View Post

Do you guys buy a lot of Cd's? I usually buy music digitally on Bandcamp, but am not finding a lot of electronica there. Lots on sound cloud that I like and want to buy, but don't see any option for buying flac.

 

Bleep is my primary source for buying electronic music, and also Juno. Both of these are UK-based sites but that's not really an issue if you're buying digital. Beatport is another option, but I often find it's more expensive. I do still buy a fair few CDs as well - mainly on Discogs Marketplace.

 

EDIT: Boomkat isn't bad either!


Edited by WraithApe - Yesterday at 6:41 am
post #6022 of 6030
Quote:
Originally Posted by WraithApe View Post

Bleep is my primary source for buying electronic music, and also Juno. Both of these are UK-based sites but that's not really an issue if you're buying digital. Beatport is another option, but I often find it's more expensive. I do still buy a fair few CDs as well - mainly on Discogs Marketplace.

EDIT: Boomkat isn't bad either!
Thanks, that's exactly what I needed to know. Coming from metal, which is mostly on Bandcamp, I am having a hard time finding electronica albums I want to buy!
post #6023 of 6030

Digital tunes is a pretty great place to buy stuff from too. No extra cost for lossless unlike other sites and they seem cheaper in general.

post #6024 of 6030

This is great. Have any of you used http://www.residentadvisor.net/ for reviews? Listening to the stuff they review and they seem to like stuff I do.

post #6025 of 6030
Quote:
Originally Posted by bavinck View Post
 

This is great. Have any of you used http://www.residentadvisor.net/ for reviews? Listening to the stuff they review and they seem to like stuff I do.

 

Yup, that's my go-to site for reviews.

post #6026 of 6030

I was having a real hard time finding digital albums for the music they review, but bleep seems to have a lot of it!

post #6027 of 6030

post #6028 of 6030
Quote:
Originally Posted by bavinck View Post
 

This is great. Have any of you used http://www.residentadvisor.net/ for reviews? Listening to the stuff they review and they seem to like stuff I do.


Forgot about that one. Thnx.

post #6029 of 6030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lohb View Post
 

 

Reachy Prints is good - not quite Double Figure or Spokes good, but definitely an improvement over Scintilli.

post #6030 of 6030

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Music
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Electronic Music Exchange (House, DnB, Dubstep, etc.)