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The Numbering Disease: Where Skullcandy and Monster Win - Page 2

post #16 of 49

I wouldn't ask for names like BASS MONSTERS, but something nice AND with a number.

 

Like for example:

 

Audio-Technica Destiny S1

AKG Siren Q1

Ultrasone Movement P1

 

etc.

 

Something simple, non-ridiculous like some of Skullcandy's worst, and people could easily identify. Numbers are good too, but keep it simple and AFTER the model name.

 

Numbers and letters alone is bordering on being as ridiculous as Skullcandy names.

 

Panasonic RPTX-7

 

Could have been...

 

Panasonic Retros 7

 

 

See?

post #17 of 49
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Katun View Post

 

No, no, no. That's not what he is saying at all.

 

First, I don't think it would do squat to their market. You could have the coolest freakin' name for a pair of M50s. Does that mean every teenager on the planet is going to run and buy one because of the name? Absolutely not. Like I mentioned, there is a price barrier for the majority of general audio consumers. It maxes out at about $50. For those who are brave and venture into a pair of $150 Beats, they aren't doing it for the sound. They are strictly doing it for fashion and social appeal. It's like a social status boost. Because why in the world would someone pay for a $150 decent headphone, when one could buy a $100 fantastic headphone? Because they don't care for sound. If they did, companies like SC and Monster wouldn't exist.

 

And again, once you jump into the world of audiophiles, you know the headphone's name means absolutely nothing. Because we aren't after names, looks, or popularity. We are after for sound quality, sound quality, and sound quality. Others of our type will be looking for insane value headphones, or all arounders. Regardless, we look for sound. The general public will look for popularity and visual appeal. Thus, they *need* to have names. Us on the other hand, numbers make great names.

 

 

I'm not saying it would be some sort of miracle for market share (That reminds me I totally forgot UM!  All their models have awesome names.) but a name and an attempt at marketing would help somewhat

 

This is getting a little off topic though.  I'm not trying to say that they need to do this or fail, I'm just making an observation and wondering if other people prefer model model names as well or just don't care.


Edited by maverickronin - 3/14/11 at 11:26am
post #18 of 49

I'm with you maverick.

 

They can use classy names, and nothing like SLIMZ, or Ear Pollution, or nonsense like that. Audiophiles are more mature than that. Orpheus, Tesla, Darkvoice, Asgard, all classy names. Some cans and amps are doing it, and it works well. Doesn't even have to be for every model. But model lines.

 

Like instead of  DT 770, 880, 990, it could be:

 

Beyer Premium Alistair C7 (C for closed), SO8 (for semi open), O9 (for open)

 

I'm not great with thinking up names, but I'm sure they can....


Edited by Mad Lust Envy - 3/14/11 at 11:32am
post #19 of 49

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by maverickronin View Post

I'm not saying it would be some sort of miracle for market share (That reminds me I totally forgot UM!  All their models have awesome names.) but a name and an attempt at marketing would help somewhat

 

This is getting a little off topic though.  I'm not trying to say that they need to do this or fail, I'm just making an observation and wondering if other people prefer model model names as well or just don't care.


Alright. Now that we have that cleared up, I think naming headphones would be pretty neat. Obviously still, a number will suit most headphones just fine, but a refreshing twist of naming higher end headphones would be interesting. I could swing it either way. But at least nobody can have a beef with numbers. Imagine if they named the HD800 "The Galactus" or something. tongue.gif

post #20 of 49

HD800 - Sennheiser Proto-Faust

 

cool.gif


Edited by Mad Lust Envy - 3/14/11 at 11:41am
post #21 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katun View Post

Imagine if they named the HD800 "The Galactus" or something. tongue.gif


It looks sci-fi enough to be named "Galactus".

post #22 of 49

SL500
911
F430
442

Camaro
Mustang
Corvette
Fiero

I doubt many are confused about what either of the two above groups represents. Know your target audience. I seriously don't believe naming the HD800 into a catchy name would dramatically increase it's sales.


If you notice, most luxury car brands don't use catchy names. If you also notice, most average priced cars do. Yes there are exceptions. But for the most part the more money someone spends on a car the less important a name is.


With headphones the names may not directly correlate to cost, but you will notice that the companies that overall are less concerned with sound quality are more concerned with a catchy name that will attract a younger audience or attract people where sound quality isn't a first priority.

People who are concerned with sound will also do more research than people who are not. So pretty names are more irrelevant and may be a turnoff in many cases.

Again, I seriously doubt there would be significant increases in the HD800, T1, LCD-2, ED8, HE6, D7000, PS1000, O2 or JH16 sales figures if they had different names.

post #23 of 49

I think the expressions "couldn't hurt" and "would just improve it" pretty much sum this thread

post #24 of 49

I think a lot of it also has to do with cultures. If you are going to make a japanese product and sell it in the states, you do not want to name something the 'wang' for example, though I know a company did for sh*ts and giggles. By naming something with a number their are no mistakes that can be made. Also other cultures, like the Germans have just always been doing things that way. In my opinion Germany and Japan make the best electronics and products so if thats the way they want to do things its all good to me. 

post #25 of 49

I think companies go with the letters and numbers naming because it can't go wrong. It's very neutral and won't make people think any less or greater of the headphone. It's just a default way of naming their products so it doesn't just target a specific audience. If they were to name them all then people might like a certain headphone better because it's got a cooler name (not saying we all do that, but some might). Also vice versa, if something is named silly like "Audio Technica Biebers" then even if it's amazing headphones, the name would turn off some people. It would be hard for the companies to create names for ALL their products that would sound "cool" to everyone. Therefore, they simply use the simple letters and numbers which can't go wrong.

post #26 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by baka1969 View Post

SL500
911
F430
442

Camaro
Mustang
Corvette
Fiero

I doubt many are confused about what either of the two above groups represents. Know your target audience. I seriously don't believe naming the HD800 into a catchy name would dramatically increase it's sales.
 


I never said it would dramatically increase its sales.  Just that it wouldn't hurt and might help a little.  People who don't care won't care what its called will buy it either way but some people may.  In any case it would be cooler, which was my main point.

 

Also, its mostly the mid-range luxury cars that have numbers.  Once you get to the very top many of them have names again.

post #27 of 49

Quote:Originally Posted by maverickronin 


"I never said it would dramatically increase its sales.  Just that it wouldn't hurt and might help a little.  People who don't care won't care what its called will buy it either way but some people may.  In any case it would be cooler, which was my main point.
Also, its mostly the mid-range luxury cars that have numbers.  Once you get to the very top many of them have names again."



Funny enough I knew that would be the example you'd use. :)

Of course there are no hard and fast rules about it. I do believe, however, that people who purchase a Rolls Royce are more after the prestige of the name more then the technical merits of the automobile itself. Personally I prefer Aston Martin. But that's just me. I believe a similar thing happens with the Lambo vs Ferrari. I'll use the Prancing Horse's racing heritage to support my claim.


I don't think the top tier headphones would get much of a boost in sales to justify a silly or catchy name. IMHO

post #28 of 49

On the other hand you also have to factor in non-english speaking countries, in which case numbers and letters would probably be a better fit. This wouldn't be a problem with cars because cars are much more well known. Headphones don't come close to cars when it comes to reputation.

post #29 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by baka1969 View Post

I don't think the top tier headphones would get much of a boost in sales to justify a silly or catchy name. IMHO


Well it wouldn't cost very much at all to print something different on the box or website so I don't think you'd need much to justify it.  A couple of creative people spend a day thinking about it and another day online to check it out for unintended consequences should be everything else you'd need in addition to whatever trademark stuff you'd have to do with a number/letter combo already.

 

But that's still straying a bit  This is more about if would you like it if they used names instead of numbers.  Its not really about if you think they don't need to, if its a bad idea, a good idea, feasible or not.  I kind of just threw the marketing thing in the OP as an afterthought about how it might be useful to have names.  It wasn't the main thrust of my point.  I was highlighting something I like about SK and Monster but I'm not saying that other companies have to or should follow suit just because I would like them to.

 

This wasn't meant a complex cost/benefit analysis.  Its just about what I prefer and me asking if other people agree or disagree.

post #30 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobaccoRoad View Post

On the other hand you also have to factor in non-english speaking countries, in which case numbers and letters would probably be a better fit. This wouldn't be a problem with cars because cars are much more well known. Headphones don't come close to cars when it comes to reputation.



Right, because having its name in english would so make people regret their purchase...

Besides, if you're buying a 100$ dollar pair of cans and you have troubles with English, just give up! smily_headphones1.gif


Edited by LizardKing1 - 3/14/11 at 4:55pm
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