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Sennheiser HD 600 Impressions Thread - Page 306

post #4576 of 17151
 
Originally Posted by wrightanswer@ear View Post
 

Sennheiser Service response to my question to them about the small silver sticker inside the left ear cup, which can be seen glinting (annoyingly to me) behind the grille:

 

"It sounds to me like that is one of our new holographic product ID tags which we began using recently to help customers identify real Sennheiser products opposed to counterfeit products. There should be no harm in removing the sticker if it bothers you, but just stick it inside your headphone case and keep it rather than throwing it away. You might end up wanting it in the future to prove the authenticity of your headphones".

 

That holographic sticker is on (the left cup of) my very recently acquired HD600 (which I bought from an authorized Senn dealer, RazorDogAudio), as well.  I don't think there's really ever been an issue with HD600 fakes.. but I'm glad Senn's including something like this as it does offer peace of mind.. especially if someone plans on reselling their HD6x0.

post #4577 of 17151
Meh.

1. I've never heard of a counterfeit HD600. If someone could produce headphones that sounded just like the HD600 for less, that would be wonderful.

2. Holographic stickers always amuse me. Let me get this straight: you're [I'm talking to Sennheiser here, not FlySweep] saying that someone produced headphones that in appearance and sound are indistinguishable from HD600s, but they can't produce a little holographic sticker?

Please...where do you think those holographic stickers get made? How hard do you think it would be have copies made for pennies? Or how hard do you think it would be for someone to swipe a giant roll of those stickers from the same Chinese factory that makes those stickers for Sennheiser?

A lot of counterfeits of other goods aren't really counterfeits (in the sense of being inferior copies made by a 3rd party). Instead, Brand [X] contracts with Supplier [Y], to produce Widget [Z]. From 9am to 5pm (or whatever), Y produces Z for X. From 5pm to 9am (or whatever), Y produces extra Z, and sells it on the black market. The Z that gets made at midnight is indistinguishable from the Z that gets made at noon. (Another way of doing the same thing is that Y produces Z for X around the clock for a week, then ships all of the Z to X. But after the order ships, Y continues to manufacture extra Z for private resale.)
post #4578 of 17151

I'll have to look for one on mine.  I purchased from RazorDog also and am quite confident in their authenticity.

post #4579 of 17151

Well, if Sennheiser is going to the trouble of introducing a new step in its production runs to add stickers, there must be some issue with counterfeits that they've become aware of, even if we aren't.

post #4580 of 17151
One has to remember. If there are fakes out there, they wouldn't have to sound the same, just not terrible. How many people outside our little universe get to hear things before they buy? If some outsider found a pair of "650"s for less. They would scoop them up on name alone, and have no idea that they don't sound like they should. It's all in the name for some. Ala beats. Don't get so pissy about the stickers. I agree they should not be easily visible, but most people wouldn't care.
post #4581 of 17151

And holographic stickers aren't just any old stickers that can be easily copied and reproduced. Most likely they are provided to Sennheiser by a company that specializes in security and is trustworthy, probably the same kind of company that governments and organizations use for their holographic stickers on things like credit cards, currency, and passports. From the wikipedia article:

Quote:
Security holograms are very difficult to forge because they are replicated from a master hologram which requires expensive, specialized and technologically advanced equipment.

 

You can read more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_hologram

 

While a fake may not be easily noticeable to the end-user it would be obvious when compared to the original. So all you need to be assured of is that the company that prints the holographic stickers isn't giving them out to other people as well.


Edited by devhen - 10/3/13 at 1:19pm
post #4582 of 17151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keithpgdrb View Post

Don't get so pissy about the stickers. I agree they should not be easily visible, but most people wouldn't care.

 



I couldn't care less about stickers, holographic or not. Frankly, I don't look at my headphones, I wear them. And my eyes can't see my ears. <8^P
post #4583 of 17151
Quote:
Originally Posted by amcananey View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keithpgdrb View Post

Don't get so pissy about the stickers. I agree they should not be easily visible, but most people wouldn't care.

I couldn't care less about stickers, holographic or not. Frankly, I don't look at my headphones, I wear them. And my eyes can't see my ears. <8^P

 

Agreed. But if you're annoyed by it just remove it, as the Sennheiser rep recommended, and leave it on the box. One of the very best aspects of the HD600's design IMO is that it can very easily be snapped apart and put back together:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mM2Cb0De1Y8


Edited by devhen - 10/3/13 at 1:33pm
post #4584 of 17151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keithpgdrb View Post

One has to remember. If there are fakes out there, they wouldn't have to sound the same, just not terrible. How many people outside our little universe get to hear things before they buy? If some outsider found a pair of "650"s for less. They would scoop them up on name alone, and have no idea that they don't sound like they should. It's all in the name for some. Ala beats.

 



Well, yeah. But nobody is going to not buy a pair of headphones that otherwise appear to be HD650s just because they have a holographic sticker that is slightly different from what an "authentic" sticker is supposed to look like (and, in fact, they won't even know what the sticker is supposed to look like). Moreover, the sticker is apparently insider the driver housing...what are the odds that anyone will get a good look at it from outside the packaging anyway?

If holographic stickers are supposed to stop counterfeiting, they won't work.

If holographic stickers are supposed to stop people from buying something that otherwise looks identical to originals, it won't work.

If holographic stickers are supposed to stop people from submitting counterfeits for factory service, that can work. But if something breaks on your Sennheisers (or Sennheiser counterfeits), you don't send the headphones to Sennheiser for service...you buy the replacement parts from Sennheiser and install them yourself. But at that point the counterfeiter already has your money and could care less anyway.
post #4585 of 17151


The sticker is the little square patch closish to the connector. The hologram is a small sennheiser logo in the centre of the sticker, nothing else
post #4586 of 17151
LOL. Was it even visible in the packaging? I don't see how that would stop anything...
post #4587 of 17151
Wait...I just remembered...with my HD650s at least (since sold), the packaging was foam, inside a cardboard box, with a cardboard sleeve around the outside. You couldn't even see the HD650s, let alone a small hologram inside the driver housing inside the box inside the sleeve!
post #4588 of 17151


A closer shot
post #4589 of 17151
Quote:
Originally Posted by amcananey View Post

Well, yeah. But nobody is going to not buy a pair of headphones that otherwise appear to be HD650s just because they have a holographic sticker that is slightly different from what an "authentic" sticker is supposed to look like (and, in fact, they won't even know what the sticker is supposed to look like). Moreover, the sticker is apparently insider the driver housing...what are the odds that anyone will get a good look at it from outside the packaging anyway?

If holographic stickers are supposed to stop counterfeiting, they won't work.

If holographic stickers are supposed to stop people from buying something that otherwise looks identical to originals, it won't work.

If holographic stickers are supposed to stop people from submitting counterfeits for factory service, that can work. But if something breaks on your Sennheisers (or Sennheiser counterfeits), you don't send the headphones to Sennheiser for service...you buy the replacement parts from Sennheiser and install them yourself. But at that point the counterfeiter already has your money and could care less anyway.

 

Read my post above where I linked to the wikipedia article for security holograms. Its merely a way to prove that the particular headphone you have is authentic. If you are missing the sticker that doesn't prove it is inauthentic since you could have easily misplaced it. Therefore Senn won't require it for warranty service. If you have a sticker that has been faked it will be obvious when compared to an authentic sticker or when Sennheiser examines it. Its not a full-proof solution and isn't meant to be one. It merely helps. An HD600 sold without a sticker should be more closely scrutinized in regards to its authenticity and Sennheiser is basically just telling us that an HD600 that has the correct holographic sticker intact can be safely regarded as authentic. Part of it is simply to make buyers feel more confident about their purchase.


Edited by devhen - 10/3/13 at 2:02pm
post #4590 of 17151

I didn't even notice until someone pointed it out

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