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Calling All "Vintage" Integrated/Receiver Owners - Page 541

post #8101 of 13402
Quote:
Originally Posted by bce22 View Post

 

 

 

Thanks for the links everyone!

 

i'm defintely doing this!  i promise to take pictures to share!  For the record, these mach one speakers are pretty sick.  Tomorrow my he-500s are being delivered. It's gonna be a fun couple of weeks I think playing with this new gear!

 

Oh man, those HE500s are going to sound bada$$ out of that receiver. Give it a DeOxit treatment, check for DC voltage at the speaker terminals, and you'll have one sweet headphone AND speaker rig! smily_headphones1.gif

 

That turntable is a great one as well. Got any record stores nearby?

post #8102 of 13402

I agree with Calipilot...the he500 is a special hp as long you drive them properly. Now I don't know much about the receiver you've got, but all indications are that it should be pretty darn good. 

 

You may have yourself quite a moment when you first listen to that setup. Enjoy!!

post #8103 of 13402

I just picked up a Kenwood KR-5400 at a local Goodwill and everything seems to work as advertised except the lights. The only one that illuminates is the red one on the end of the tuning indicator. Since none of the other lights work (4-5 of them, I think), I'm leaning toward something other than bulbs. Anyone here got any ideas or how I could check if it's something central to all the bulbs or even check them individually? I took one out and can't figure out how to remove the bulb from the holder. I didn't apply too much pulling force because I'm leery of breaking something.

post #8104 of 13402

It is not at all uncommon for these 70s receivers to have all the bulbs burned out.  I have seen this many times.  You may want to pop the cover and see what bulbs they are and look for replacements.  If you have a meter you can check for voltage at the socket or even check continuity through the bulb (i.e. just measure the resistance).  If you get no resistance reading the bulb is burned out.

post #8105 of 13402

My bulb was burned out in my Marantz...took the cover off and easily replaced it. Except the damn clips broke, so I electrical taped it to keep it from falling backwards. Ugh.

post #8106 of 13402

Batteries and Bulbs plus is a good resource for these old bulbs. Most of them are about 6 volts, but you'll need to check.

post #8107 of 13402

MattTCG is right the standard US and UK  dial light bulbs are 6.3 volts -changed thousands in old tube radios and amps . It relates back to the old industry standard for automobiles of a 6 volt battery. Some later Japanese equipment used tiny bulbs but 90 % are your standard 6.3 value.Only on live mains equipment with NO mains isolating transformer [dont buy any-dangerous ] is the value different.  

post #8108 of 13402
Quote:
Originally Posted by duncan1 View Post

MattTCG is right the standard US and UK  dial light bulbs are 6.3 volts -changed thousands in old tube radios and amps . It relates back to the old industry standard for automobiles of a 6 volt battery. Some later Japanese equipment used tiny bulbs but 90 % are your standard 6.3 value.Only on live mains equipment with NO mains isolating transformer [dont buy any-dangerous ] is the value different.  

 

That is contrary to what I have found - at least in old Sherwood receivers.  Most have been 8V 150ma or 8V 300ma.  I usually have to replace with 6V and series resistor.

post #8109 of 13402

Interesting. I have worked on the Pioneers mostly. 

post #8110 of 13402

Speakerbox .-This is/was a US standard . Prewar UK heater voltages were 4 volts and so were the dial lights I have repaired 1000s of old tube equipment dating back to the 20s don't take my word for this visit -radio[wireless] information and repair websites of whom I post on several and  you will find I am speaking the truth. The UK "went USA" in tubes from the late 30s onward 80% of the tubes used are from the US-6-series tubes-IE- 6V6G-6K7G-6Q7G-6K8G-and 100s more. on oping up my valve[tube testers books-AVO VCM MK4- and Taylor model 45C there are long lists of 6.3V heater voltages --FAR  exceeding ANY other voltage.. The same applies to my valve[tube] equivalent books Wireless World -valve  books[used by the UK scientific community at the time]  and RSGB[radio society of GB]- a long list of war dept equivalents. most in 6.3V heaters. Even your own US book-"Modern Radio Servicing"-by Alfred a Chirardi -1st edition- which I have -copyright -1935- has a long list of 6.3 tubes- Its YOUR country that Popularized this heater voltage I thought every body dealing in tubes in the US knew this- and IF THE HEATERS   WERE -6.3 V then you can "bet your life" the DIAL lamps  were too!   I have a VERY large collection of books on tubes and spent years repairing and building tube equipment and that includes many US early books on the subject . The British used US designed parts especially after the war [WW2]  The Japanese early tube radios used the same voltage..ONLY SERIES CONNECTED tubes used different voltages because there was in 99% of the cases NO mains isolation transformer BUT a VERY big ceramic -DROPPING resistor which usually ended up cracking the Bakelite  cases with the heat they produced . Even in the UK armed services communication receivers used tubes with heaters of 6.3V into the mi-60s and I have several.

post #8111 of 13402
Quote:
Originally Posted by duncan1 View Post

Speakerbox .-This is/was a US standard . Prewar UK heater voltages were 4 volts and so were the dial lights I have repaired 1000s of old tube equipment dating back to the 20s don't take my word for this visit -radio[wireless] information and repair websites of whom I post on several and  you will find I am speaking the truth. The UK "went USA" in tubes from the late 30s onward 80% of the tubes used are from the US-6-series tubes-IE- 6V6G-6K7G-6Q7G-6K8G-and 100s more. on oping up my valve[tube testers books-AVO VCM MK4- and Taylor model 45C there are long lists of 6.3V heater voltages --FAR  exceeding ANY other voltage.. The same applies to my valve[tube] equivalent books Wireless World -valve  books[used by the UK scientific community at the time]  and RSGB[radio society of GB]- a long list of war dept equivalents. most in 6.3V heaters. Even your own US book-"Modern Radio Servicing"-by Alfred a Chirardi -1st edition- which I have -copyright -1935- has a long list of 6.3 tubes- Its YOUR country that Popularized this heater voltage I thought every body dealing in tubes in the US knew this- and IF THE HEATERS   WERE -6.3 V then you can "bet your life" the DIAL lamps  were too!   I have a VERY large collection of books on tubes and spent years repairing and building tube equipment and that includes many US early books on the subject . The British used US designed parts especially after the war [WW2]  The Japanese early tube radios used the same voltage..ONLY SERIES CONNECTED tubes used different voltages because there was in 99% of the cases NO mains isolation transformer BUT a VERY big ceramic -DROPPING resistor which usually ended up cracking the Bakelite  cases with the heat they produced . Even in the UK armed services communication receivers used tubes with heaters of 6.3V into the mi-60s and I have several.

 

Well, I certainly beleive 6.3v is standard now - because that is all I can find.  Just say my experience is that I am running into 8v dial lamps  (fuse and bayonet style) in the old Sherwoods and a few other old units I have worked on.  So I end up converting from 8v to 6.3v when replacing.  Interesting history, though.

post #8112 of 13402

Guys ive been using a PICO DAC with my vintage gear and have no complaints. Im curious as to any upgrades DAC wise I might consider. Sorry if this an off kilter post here but I trust you guys on this thread. I would want USB capability as well. Budget under 700 if possible. Thanks!

post #8113 of 13402

Speakerbox- The fuse/bayonet style dial lamps you speak of  "rung a bell" when I worked for BT [British telecoms] in the 60s/70s old analogue business telephone systems that was the very type used to display if a exchange line was being used or extension was in use. I changed plenty of them they were push in to a slot the only problem was removing the old ones you needed a special tool. So as they were made in very large numbers tube equipment makers  in the late 60s/70s were able to buy them in bulk cheaper than the normal 6.3V screw in kind.used previously.You could say it was an end of an ERA for the old type. 

post #8114 of 13402
T
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trav View Post

Guys ive been using a PICO DAC with my vintage gear and have no complaints. Im curious as to any upgrades DAC wise I might consider. Sorry if this an off kilter post here but I trust you guys on this thread. I would want USB capability as well. Budget under 700 if possible. Thanks!
Trav, I'd be looking at the bifrost with über still in your budget. Used ones here will save you money but you have to do the uber upgrade yourself. The bifrost sounds fantastic with my vintage amps.

GL !!
post #8115 of 13402

Very interesting Duncan1 - sounds like you have been around the block a few times with the older equipment.  I have worked as an electrical engineer and computer scientist since the 80s - so have seen my share of stuff too.  Have been an audio fanatic since I was 10 yesrs old and my uncle used to give me old tube equipment that Muzak in Toronto was going to toss.  I would peice together tube audio systems from his "junk".  Much of it old Bogen tube amps (sounded pretty good actually).

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