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Calling All "Vintage" Integrated/Receiver Owners - Page 532

post #7966 of 12885
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattTCG View Post

I finally am done with the cabinet for the sx-650!! Here a quick shot Beautiful work! Nice find on the 9090...I'm not jealous at all...no really I'm not..I have a disease that turns me green.
.



The front corners were painful. But I think that it came out pretty good. Certainly better than the stock cabinet.

Here's some irony. On the very day that I finish the sx-650, I picked up a 9090db. eek.gif
   Yep. Couldn't resist the deal. I blame Moody for this one. wink.gif
post #7967 of 12885
Quote:
Here's some irony. On the very day that I finish the sx-650, I picked up a 9090db. eek.gif
   Yep. Couldn't resist the deal. I blame Moody for this one. wink.gif

You can stop now if you want Matt - the 9090db should satisfy you for the long term. smily_headphones1.gif Congrats and love to hear how it compares with your Pioneer on the various cans you're using.
post #7968 of 12885
Hey guys, I wish to venture into the world of vintage receivers. Is this a good buy?
http://phoenix.craigslist.org/evl/ele/3798488006.html

I primarily wanted to use it for the phono amp and the headphone output.
Edited by Destroysall - 6/30/13 at 9:56pm
post #7969 of 12885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroysall View Post

Hey guys, I wish to venture into the world of vintage receivers. Is this a good buy?
http://phoenix.craigslist.org/evl/ele/3798488006.html

I primarily wanted to use it for the phono amp and the headphone output.

Seems reasonable to me since you don't have to pay shipping. Seems to be in very good shape besides the veneer, which can be fixed unlike defects in the face. I bought a similar power Yamaha for $35 and a 60W late '70's Kenwood for $50, but honestly, paying a few bucks more than a 'score' price isn't going to matter if you like the look of the receiver and plan to keep it awhile.

I would bring your headphones along and listen to them on the actual receiver, and if the phono stage is important, hopefully you can verify that's working as well before you buy.
post #7970 of 12885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroysall View Post

Hey guys, I wish to venture into the world of vintage receivers. Is this a good buy?
http://phoenix.craigslist.org/evl/ele/3798488006.html

I primarily wanted to use it for the phono amp and the headphone output.

Looks good - MattTCG can make you a real wood case, no problem...

post #7971 of 12885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroysall View Post

Hey guys, I wish to venture into the world of vintage receivers. Is this a good buy?
http://phoenix.craigslist.org/evl/ele/3798488006.html

I primarily wanted to use it for the phono amp and the headphone output.

Like captouch suggested, show up with phones, iPod, RCA cables amped plug in and test the headphone out. Looks like a good deal.
post #7972 of 12885
Quote:
Originally Posted by captouch View Post


You can stop now if you want Matt - the 9090db should satisfy you for the long term. smily_headphones1.gif Congrats and love to hear how it compares with your Pioneer on the various cans you're using.

 

There will be no more vintage receivers unless I sell one of my current stock. I have a two amp rule, no more. I don't have the space for another one anyway. Plus my wife would likely divorce me. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by parbaked View Post

Looks good - MattTCG can make you a real wood case, no problem...

Yes, I'm offering custom vintage cabinet replacement. All types of wood and finishes available. They start at $500 and will be ready within a year of receiving your payment. tongue.gif

post #7973 of 12885

Question: Is there a way to reduce/eliminate the "hiss" on my hd650 when using a vintage receiver? There is no hiss coming from my orthos. Just wondered. 

 

thanks...

post #7974 of 12885
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattTCG View Post

Question: Is there a way to reduce/eliminate the "hiss" on my hd650 when using a vintage receiver? There is no hiss coming from my orthos. Just wondered. 

thanks...

This is through the HP jack, not directly from speaker outputs, right? Only with volume turned up with no music playing or inbetween tracks at normal listening volumes?

On receivers with a -20dB muting button, I've heard some people use that. If from speaker taps, I've heard some people use a resistor network. But if the hiss is inherently there at loud enough volumes even with orthos or speakers, the transistors may just be noisy - heard some people replace the vintage transistors in signal path with new low noise equivalents that also reduced his for them.
post #7975 of 12885

Think the hiss on Matts Pioneer is probably just an impedance match with the 650's as has already been mentioned. You can buy rca attenuators to knock 20 decibels out of your amp but I don't think it will work because the same power will be leaving your amp. Only more resistance of power going in. 

 

Anyways...

 

I've been doing a bit of research on another troubling area with these old amplifiers. Capacitors. Mainly bad capacitors! eek.gif And basically what to look and 'hear' for when trying to decide if they need replacing or not. I've been concerned about this after getting my Marantz and thinking that I had leaking caps... But the amp sounded amazing? Anyways, turns out it was glue redface.gif dried old glue at the base of a couple of caps. You can see a little of the glue on the side of caps only it has turned dark brown with age round the base. The caps are fine, no bulging or distortion. Old yes, but fine. So it looks like I may get a few more good years out of it and I'm verry pleased because I just love the sound..! 

 

Been ploughing through a lot of AudioKarma on the subject and the general consensus seems to be if it ain't broke don't fix it. Unless you enjoy doing it and enjoy bringing 'new life' into these old machines for fun. Please note, I'm sure recapping has benefits on 30+ year old machines. But to folks like me who have never used a clothes iron, nevermind a soldering one... It's just not gonna happen. 

 

So unless caps are showing signs of exploding and killing your family. Just leave them be. 

 

Signs that they are bad are : Bulging, distorted shape, leaking (no STD jokes please:)

 

Signs that they are good : No Bulging, no distorted shape, no leaking, and you have nice clear sound :D    

 

beerchug.gif

post #7976 of 12885
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post

Think the hiss on Matts Pioneer is probably just an impedance match with the 650's as has already been mentioned. You can buy rca attenuators to knock 20 decibels out of your amp but I don't think it will work because the same power will be leaving your amp. Only more resistance of power going in. 

 

Anyways...

 

I've been doing a bit of research on another troubling area with these old amplifiers. Capacitors. Mainly bad capacitors! eek.gif And basically what to look and 'hear' for when trying to decide if they need replacing or not. I've been concerned about this after getting my Marantz and thinking that I had leaking caps... But the amp sounded amazing? Anyways, turns out it was glue redface.gif dried old glue at the base of a couple of caps. You can see a little of the glue on the side of caps only it has turned dark brown with age round the base. The caps are fine, no bulging or distortion. Old yes, but fine. So it looks like I may get a few more good years out of it and I'm verry pleased because I just love the sound..! 

 

Been ploughing through a lot of AudioKarma on the subject and the general consensus seems to be if it ain't broke don't fix it. Unless you enjoy doing it and enjoy bringing 'new life' into these old machines for fun. Please note, I'm sure recapping has benefits on 30+ year old machines. But to folks like me who have never used a clothes iron, nevermind a soldering one... It's just not gonna happen. 

 

So unless caps are showing signs of exploding and killing your family. Just leave them be. 

 

Signs that they are bad are : Bulging, distorted shape, leaking (no STD jokes please:)

 

Signs that they are good : No Bulging, no distorted shape, no leaking, and you have nice clear sound :D    

 

beerchug.gif

This.  I now have 4 30+ year old integrateds/receivers and none are even going to be looked at for trouble till they SHOW me they are trouble. 

post #7977 of 12885

Hello,

 

I just receiving my McIntosh MC225. I tried it with my AKG K1000, HE6 and HE60. I can say it's the best amplifier that I own. The bandwith are wide and doesn't seem shortened. When I hear it I don't think about bass, treble or medium, all frequencies are integrated and not highlighted. It just let flow the music effortless. It doesn't sound muddy or harsh. There are a lot of air but isn't distant or etched. It has that clarity that let your hear each instrument. 

It can be fast like a thunder. 

The HE6 on it has tremendous bass.


Edited by Hun7er - 7/1/13 at 3:27pm
post #7978 of 12885

Outstanding Hun7er! Pix please...wink.gif

post #7979 of 12885

I won't be long until the word is truly out about how well the vintage gear can drive hp's and then we'll all be paying 2x as much for said gear. mad.gif

post #7980 of 12885

2x what we pay now... is that all confused.gif We'll see value ripped straight from our clutches! frown.gif

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