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Calling All "Vintage" Integrated/Receiver Owners - Page 477

post #7141 of 13339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trav View Post

I had the good fortune of hearing Moodys rig at the meet last week and it was....jaw droppingly good. My T50RP's absolutely blossomed! Needless to say I will be joining you lads ASAP in the vintage club.

 

The 9090DB is highly regarded in this AK thread: http://www.audiokarma.org/forums/showthread.php?t=302833

post #7142 of 13339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trav View Post

I had the good fortune of hearing Moodys rig at the meet last week and it was....jaw droppingly good. My T50RP's absolutely blossomed! Needless to say I will be joining you lads ASAP in the vintage club.

 

I will say that exact same thing about my Maddogs. They have never sounded as good as I heard them through that vintage amp. Now granted, there was a sacd player connected to it, but man did my MD's sound good. 

post #7143 of 13339
Must have been meant for me to be a Kenwood guy, cause I just bought my SECOND KA-5700 this week. First is for my main head Fi station, this will be for my computer rig. cool.gif
post #7144 of 13339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylab View Post

I don't know anything about that Technics but if that Model Eleven works completely then that is a pretty sweet piece.

The Model eleven looks so cool but its apparently gone. I got him down to $200 from $375 though :) the Technics was sold as well. There is a Model Eleven G for sale on CL for $260 though

post #7145 of 13339

Has anyone had to do any replacement of the old caps in they're vintage gear ? A lot of electrolytic caps have a pretty short life span, as in 5 to 10 years. I have a vintage Pioneer SX-650. My GF found it at a garage sale for $20, I traded her a nice Zalman laptop cooler for it, we were both pleased with our new toys. Back in the Day I really wanted to get a Pioneer receiver, but ended up with a JVC integrated, it was a sweet little amp, forget the model, about 65 watts I think, I still have the original receipt in my stereo folder. I have almost every receipt and manual from my purchases over the years.

post #7146 of 13339
Quote:
Originally Posted by PredatorZ View Post

Has anyone had to do any replacement of the old caps in they're vintage gear ? 

 

Yes, most will need some caps replaced......and a few transistors too in some Pioneer units.

post #7147 of 13339
Quote:
Originally Posted by BmWr75 View Post

Yes, most will need some caps replaced......and a few transistors too in some Pioneer units.

So what are the signs of needing this done?

I now have two identical KA-5700 integrated amps and both play flawlessly with the exception that one has a slight amount of volume change noise that I have Deoxit arriving today to address.
post #7148 of 13339

Oregonian- SS amps of the 70s up to the 80s usually had caps that while up to the standards  then would not pass muster now. Low background hum or if you short out the input and turn the volume up to test. Or a slight increase in perceived distortion sibilance a bit rough/edgy. The quality of BJTs [transistors]  then was also not up to latest standards but don't change them if they are working okay.

 If the volume control is noisy a rotary control I presume  then-EITHER the carbon surface that the slider moves on is worn OR somebody has used too much force on the control and bent the slider. Take off back cover of control and SLIGHTLY bend it to put more force on the carbon track OR replace.it.

post #7149 of 13339
My Pioneer SX-1980 has been completely recapped, as has my RT-707 reel deck. I mean EVERY electrolytic cap was replaced (a big job that I of course paid someone else to do). I also recapped the crossovers in my Pioneer HPM-100 speakers.
post #7150 of 13339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oregonian View Post


So what are the signs of needing this done?

I now have two identical KA-5700 integrated amps and both play flawlessly with the exception that one has a slight amount of volume change noise that I have Deoxit arriving today to address.


As far as bad caps go, in my experience, most have an X of some type in the top cover, its a stress relief. If the caps go bad, a quick visual inspection can catch some, just look for the caps to bulge upwards, with a convex shape, or domes. But some could very well fail without showing these signs, but it a good place to start.

post #7151 of 13339
I keep reading about replacing caps and I already knew about the x thing. But is it easy to do for someone with moderate soldering skills? Where do you buy your caps? Do you buy in bulk or in exact amounts?
post #7152 of 13339
As I understand it, for something like a receiver, you need a good soldering iron, a desoldering tool, a multimeter, and a good understanding of the basic electrical values/properties of capacitors and resistors at a minimum.

Other than something easy like a speaker crossover, I have neither the time nor the skill for such a job.
post #7153 of 13339

for just a cap refresh if you have the soldering skills it isn't too bad.  some can be tedious.

if you actually have an issue with the amp that isn't a cap, troubleshooting it can be much more difficult.

 

mouser and digikey are the best places for general electrolytics and panasonic seems to be the "standard" for just a general recap. 

you don't have to order in bulk.

check out the akdatabase and see if someone has put together a recap list for your amp/receiver

 

if its just caps you could most likely get it done with moderate soldering skills.  start with something easy like your big filters or whatnot

post #7154 of 13339
Thread Starter 

Also, it depends on the amp. I've been going back and forth about doing the recap on my k-907 myself or paying someone else to do it because of how hard it is to get to many of them. I contacted a couple of kenwood vintage gurus over at audiokarma about it.

 

One responded that some caps are nearly impossible to replace because the power supply board is basically welded to an underlying copper chassis, and trying to remove it is way to risky and many people don't want to touch it. He's done it before, but its a very tedious process. The other member hasn't responded yet.

 

So although to replace the cap itself it pretty easily, it really depends on the amp as to how hard it is to get to. My fisher is super easy to work on. Being point to point, everything is laid out in front of you. you only have to remove the bottom cover to access most everything. Trying to remove pcbs from hard to reach places can be a pain.

post #7155 of 13339
I can not get over how wonderful my Harman kardon 670 sounds. Its beautiful with AKG K702 & my DT990 just fantastic sound. I've ordered new fuse lamps for it and can't wait for them to get here so I can see it lit up properly! Whoever bought this originally had a lot of money back then because in today's amount it would have been almost $2,000.
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