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Calling All "Vintage" Integrated/Receiver Owners - Page 410

post #6136 of 13412
Quote:
Originally Posted by kstuart View Post

Since I keep being wrong about what sort of Vintage equipment is of any interest to anyone, this time I will ask:

 

Are mid-1980s Japanese stereo receivers - no knobs - up and down buttons for volume and balance - of any interest to anyone  ?

 

My guess is that only receivers from the "knob era" are of interest, but I thought I would ask.....

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post

You are going to post exhibits, yes?

 popcorn.gif

 

I like the knobs, but like SO says, show me what you're workin' with. smily_headphones1.gif

post #6137 of 13412
Quote:
Originally Posted by haguy View Post

Thank you for the response, wotts. The Carver manual states the following regarding the hp jack: " HP impedance may be from a few ohms to several thousand ohms, although output level may vary depending on impedance. HP jack is driven by a separate internal amp designed to provide the correct voltage and wattage gain needed." I wish "...a few ohms..." was defined. Any other thoughts? Again, thank you.  

I would be concerned by the phrase, "HP jack is driven by a separate internal amp...."

The main reason why we obsess over using vintage receivers for headphones is because on the units of interest the speaker amplifier sections are top-notch and also drive the headphones through a simple adaptor circuit.

This means that the care and attention that the manufacturer paid to the main selling point of the amp is also powering your headphones.

Starting in the 80s, when amps-on-a-chip became economical, receiver manufacturers began segregating the headphones from the speakers and giving them their own amp. Considered on a case-by-case basis, the dedicated headphone amp circuit might or might not be good, but it's easy to make sweeping assumptions about quality when a manufacturer can add this more economically than they can insert a couple resistors between the speaker output and the headphone jack.

And principally it means that the top-notch speaker amplifier section is no longer driving your headphones, and that kind of defeats the point of going to the effort of setting up the receiver just for your headphones.

As far as output levels and impedance, I wouldn't worry overly much. They're designed to handle full-sized headphones of all varieties. The two you mention using are perfectly middle-of-the-road in terms of technical requirements. Almost the only headphones that you can't really pull out of a box and plug in are IEMs and electrostats.
post #6138 of 13412
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post


I would be concerned by the phrase, "HP jack is driven by a separate internal amp...."
The main reason why we obsess over using vintage receivers for headphones is because on the units of interest the speaker amplifier sections are top-notch and also drive the headphones through a simple adaptor circuit.
This means that the care and attention that the manufacturer paid to the main selling point of the amp is also powering your headphones.
Starting in the 80s, when amps-on-a-chip became economical, receiver manufacturers began segregating the headphones from the speakers and giving them their own amp. Considered on a case-by-case basis, the dedicated headphone amp circuit might or might not be good, but it's easy to make sweeping assumptions about quality when a manufacturer can add this more economically than they can insert a couple resistors between the speaker output and the headphone jack.
And principally it means that the top-notch speaker amplifier section is no longer driving your headphones, and that kind of defeats the point of going to the effort of setting up the receiver just for your headphones.
As far as output levels and impedance, I wouldn't worry overly much. They're designed to handle full-sized headphones of all varieties. The two you mention using are perfectly middle-of-the-road in terms of technical requirements. Almost the only headphones that you can't really pull out of a box and plug in are IEMs and electrostats.

Thank you for taking the time to explain this to me. The model receiver (HR-752) that I've been considering was manufactured for only a short time ('88-'91 I believe). I would really prefer a receiver over a dedicated hp amp to use with my hp's. I suppose I should consider a 70's receiver and use this thread as a guide. You've been very informative and I thank you. 

post #6139 of 13412
I guess I am an old fart, but it's hard for me to consider 80's as "vintage". I definitely cannot accept 1990's as vintage.

1980's was the decade when the better known brands really started cranking out crappy stuff. There was a LOT of bad gear in the 80's. some good stuff too of course, but it takes more work to get good 80's gear. What survives today from the 1970's tends to be better. Partly there was a lower quantity of cheap crap, and partly what cheap crap there was has mostly been land-filled by now.
post #6140 of 13412

The Japanese Electronics Arms Race --

 

In my view, 1980 was the last hurrah. So, I consider my 1980 Pioneer SX-D7000 vintage, but will cast a wary eye on post 1980 stuff.


Edited by Silent One - 11/12/12 at 7:30am
post #6141 of 13412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post

The Japanese Electronics Arms Race --

 

In my view, 1980 was the last hurrah. So, I consider my 1980 Pioneer SX-D7000 vintage, but will cast a wary eye on post 1980 stuff.

I have been able to listen to the SX-1080 this morning and Wow!  I don't think I need my separates anymore, they can be sold now.  I believe you are right about the Japanese Electronics Arms Race.  I think they perfected Solid State amps at that time.  We have just been waiting for music sources to catch up.  Turntable setups have incrementally improved in the past 30 years but vinyl still has it's limitations with surface noise, pops and clicks, etc.  The real big jump has been computer audio, DACs and hi-rez samples of original master tapes.  


Edited by Lee Harvey - 11/12/12 at 1:45pm
post #6142 of 13412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rawrbington View Post

Great!

Yeah htey're real wood veneer.  Problem is they are gigantic.  Might require a second bottle of the howards

I used to own the Forte and also later the Cornwall both in walnut finish and currently I own B&W 801 Matrix S3 in walnut finish too. I have always used Lemon Oil for furniture polishing (with no wax) with great results.

http://www.weiman.com/Products/Wood-Furniture,-Cabinets---Panels/Lemon-Oil-Furniture-Polish.aspx

post #6143 of 13412
Quote:
Originally Posted by wotts View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kstuart View Post

Since I keep being wrong about what sort of Vintage equipment is of any interest to anyone, this time I will ask:

 

Are mid-1980s Japanese stereo receivers - no knobs - up and down buttons for volume and balance - of any interest to anyone  ?

 

My guess is that only receivers from the "knob era" are of interest, but I thought I would ask.....

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post

You are going to post exhibits, yes?

 popcorn.gif

 

I like the knobs, but like SO says, show me what you're workin' with. smily_headphones1.gif


Okay, but I was looking more for a general sense, but here is one example:

 

post #6144 of 13412
I hope no one takes offense, but my guess is that the receiver above is very likely to suck.
post #6145 of 13412

I second that motion.

post #6146 of 13412
Constructive and informed opinions about arbitrary pieces of old gear are more available on audiokarma than here. We definitely have our biases and some of us stay well-informed but that place is full of people who collect them, we're the guys who sold and serviced them back in the day, and in some cases are the guys who designed and built them.

Even though I mostly hang out on head-fi, I keep a lurker account there and tend to check for technical opinions there first when there's a piece of equipment somewhere that's caught my eye.
post #6147 of 13412

Yeah, nobody likes that stuff. Geddit oudda here. There's no denying that in general, the flat-switch stuff is less popular. 

 

It also can't be denied that the flat-switch stuff is much easier to ship without damage. And I should just shut up about all the good devices and circuitry that hung around til at least 1985 if you chose carefully, because that just leaves more of it for me, and at prices I can afford. Still, I have the same reaction to '80s style that many of you have. Ewwww. 

 

So, uh, yeah, anything after December 31 1979 is crap and you shouldn't even think about it. As Nancy Reagan taught us: Just say no!

post #6148 of 13412

I would beg kindly beg to differ, as 1980 isn't the mid '80's. rolleyes.gif Due to the Global recession, Japanese companies in 1980 had to severely rethink things, but some companies still squeezed in some audio goodness in 1980. This can be seen in my very own 1980 SX-D7000. wink.gif But shortly thereafter....eek.gif

post #6149 of 13412

yamaha made some solid stuff in the early 80's

some of those amps they were putting out sound magnificent even today.

post #6150 of 13412
Wasn't the mid 80's the time period that saw the shift from mostly discreet SS designs to the early (and IMHO bad sounding) op-amp designs for gear that wasn't targeted at the high end?

There was some pretty great 80's high end gear - but it was being made by the fledgling Mark Levinson and such outfits, if memory serves.
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