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Calling All "Vintage" Integrated/Receiver Owners - Page 811

post #12151 of 13371

Congrats on the Sony! It's probs still waking up after all these years, maybe a little con'fuse'd. :beerchug:

post #12152 of 13371

interesting how SONY seems to have the know-how to put out superior-sounding gear but it seems that their company focus is on the mass-market, broadest-appeal-possible type of audio components.

 

the last few posts reminded me of a conversation i had last summer while in a local hi-fi shop where somebody was talking about how SONY

can make superior consumer electronics when they want to.  after he brought it up i mentioned that SONY had always seemed like the "wonder bread" brand to me.  (sold to the masses, and not much in the way of their product offerings that's very special or distinctive about it).

 

that's when he mentioned the ES series, and also mentioned how SONY had made some excellent sounding headphones in the past, too.

 

since the name brand name is so ubiquitous, it doesn't have much "cache", but people shouldn't be too quick to automatically write it off.

(familiarity breeds contempt, right?)

 

but, you never know.

 

i have an old JVC amp that certainly won't win any style awards for looks, but this old "japanese victor" piece sounds pretty darned good to me.

 

and most people would say:  "jvc?  eww."

 

well, it all depends on what type of piece you're talking about, and when it was made. 

post #12153 of 13371

IT LIVES! Now maybe I can give the wife her table back...

For those who like DIY, here's how it happened - 

This unit is old. Like, really old. So old it says it wants 117 volts, but doesn't even expect to get all of them, so it's actually designed to run on more like 90. From there, it filters (yes, you heard right - it filters line current coming in) and reduces to about 67 volts. It then uses that to make a 24 volt circuit. The extra line voltage was really torching the power supply with the weak link being the rectifier. With my friend Foxx, we already recapped the power supply board and replaced the rectifier once. The new caps have an even higher initial current draw than the old ones (since they have a higher capacitance and lower internal resistance). This seems to be horrifically stressful on the rectifier. When the rectifier fails, a board mounted fuse on the line voltage side instantly blows in a spectacular manner when the unit is turned on. It took about 3 hours of total use to blow up the new rectifier (which, by the way, always seemed a little small compared to the original one...). The new one blew after I turned it off for a few minutes then back on.

 

This problem got the engineer in me going. I mean, really, that's frikkin annoying and I don't want to deal with this problem again. Also, the fuse is soldered in, so it's a pain to replace. Anyways, first order of business was to board mount a fuse holder. Mission accomplished. New fuse - instantly blows in a flash of purple light ("slow blowing" BTW). Dang, so that ruled out a bad fuse. Second order was to pull the rectifier and confirm our suspicions. It was toast, one of the diodes had fused short. Third order was to mod the rectifier to make it bullet-proof. I wanted to get this done TODAY, but I was a little low on beefy diodes. Fortunately, Foxx had several of the same replacement rectifier diodes, so I decided to parallel them, effectively doubling the capacity of the power supply. It is working great so far. No issues, even with volume-on starts. Finally, we checked current draws to make sure that there weren't any other issued blowing things up. Checked good. It passed the stress tests too. I think this mod will solve the problem with this unit, hopefully without kicking a gremlin further down the circuit.

post #12154 of 13371
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhoenixG View Post
 

It's been a long process to get this guy, the mighty Sony STR-6120, but I finally have it turned on and fully adjusted and it is really fantastic. Honestly, as with many vintage units, the hardest part was finding one. I got this one from a guy online that I wasn't completely sure was for real. Fortunately, he was. This thing supposedly "broke" long ago and has been sitting in a box ever since. Inside, it's the cleanest unit I've ever seen. No dust, nothing. Like looking at a floor model.

After pulling it apart, it became clear that it had been dead shorted and the output power supply was toast, but a couple parts later, it was back up running. I put it out for a tuner adjustment, as it was clearly way off. The meters proved my ears right, it was something like 500% out of spec, i.e. about half a volt off in a couple places, and the tuner was even worse.

For the moment, it's still hooked up to the sansui sp-5500x's, but it'll get a better set once it moves onto my dresser as my bedroom rig. Depending on how much floor space I can spare, I'll probably put some small McIntosh or Infinity speakers with it.

Preliminary listening is making me think it will live up to its lofty reputation as the very best ES series Sony ever put out..

 

Nice! I saw one of theseat a venders mall once but it was all beat up and missing just about every knob. it was no there the next visit though... 

post #12155 of 13371

Nothing new, but thought I could share an updated pic of my Marantz 2220B. : - )

post #12156 of 13371

Nothing more beautiful than a vintage Marantz.

post #12157 of 13371

I have a thing for the Setton RS-660 and Pioneer QX9900.

post #12158 of 13371

I switched to my H/K 670 receiver last night and it will be fine for 2 or 3 minutes and then the left channel will make static sounds and then go out, the right channel will also make static sounds sometimes but it will drop in volume maybe 75% after the left channel has gone out. Anyone know what could be going on? it worked fine last time I used it... It's not hot inside the amp and it's not the cables or my DAC.

post #12159 of 13371
Quote:
Originally Posted by harrinj View Post
 

I switched to my H/K 670 receiver last night and it will be fine for 2 or 3 minutes and then the left channel will make static sounds and then go out, the right channel will also make static sounds sometimes but it will drop in volume maybe 75% after the left channel has gone out. Anyone know what could be going on? it worked fine last time I used it... It's not hot inside the amp and it's not the cables or my DAC.

 

A couple of possibilities I can think of:

 

1.) A component has developed sensitivity to heat and breaks down after warming up (usually a transistor but not always).

2.) You have a bad cap in the power supply somewhere that won't hold a charge for very long.

 

Many times you can diagnose #1 by spraying cool air on the transistors one at a time to see if they recover.  For #2 look for leaking and/or bulging caps.

 

Can be tough to find so patience is a virtue.

post #12160 of 13371

I have a nice Nikko receiver and an old Akai receiver, with the fingertip slidebar for volume control.  With some kitchy speakers that my brother bought off a guy in a parking lot with a white van.  Yeah, but they have a subwoofer in each speaker, and pretty clean tweeters and mids. 

 

But right now, I'm racking my brain to try and remember a Harman Kardon component that I saw and heard in a very nice stereo shop back in the 80's or late 70's. It's like a sound-processor for home stereo, that places sources of sound from a recording into different locations in the sound field.  It might be known as a stereo imager?  Just a small low silver-faced box with only a few buttons on the front.  To turn the effect on and off, and maybe a dial to adjust to the amount of effect.

 

Thanks for the help.  It's driving me nuts not remembering.  I'd like to find one.

post #12161 of 13371
What's your
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhoenixG View Post

IT LIVES! Now maybe I can give the wife her table back...


For those who like DIY, here's how it happened - 
This unit is old. Like, really old. So old it says it wants 117 volts, but doesn't even expect to get all of them, so it's actually designed to run on more like 90. From there, it filters (yes, you heard right - it filters line current coming in) and reduces to about 67 volts. It then uses that to make a 24 volt circuit. The extra line voltage was really torching the power supply with the weak link being the rectifier. With my friend Foxx, we already recapped the power supply board and replaced the rectifier once. The new caps have an even higher initial current draw than the old ones (since they have a higher capacitance and lower internal resistance). This seems to be horrifically stressful on the rectifier. When the rectifier fails, a board mounted fuse on the line voltage side instantly blows in a spectacular manner when the unit is turned on. It took about 3 hours of total use to blow up the new rectifier (which, by the way, always seemed a little small compared to the original one...). The new one blew after I turned it off for a few minutes then back on.

This problem got the engineer in me going. I mean, really, that's frikkin annoying and I don't want to deal with this problem again. Also, the fuse is soldered in, so it's a pain to replace. Anyways, first order of business was to board mount a fuse holder. Mission accomplished. New fuse - instantly blows in a flash of purple light ("slow blowing" BTW). Dang, so that ruled out a bad fuse. Second order was to pull the rectifier and confirm our suspicions. It was toast, one of the diodes had fused short. Third order was to mod the rectifier to make it bullet-proof. I wanted to get this done TODAY, but I was a little low on beefy diodes. Fortunately, Foxx had several of the same replacement rectifier diodes, so I decided to parallel them, effectively doubling the capacity of the power supply. It is working great so far. No issues, even with volume-on starts. Finally, we checked current draws to make sure that there weren't any other issued blowing things up. Checked good. It passed the stress tests too. I think this mod will solve the problem with this unit, hopefully without kicking a gremlin further down the circuit.

That's one fine looking receiver.

What's your wall voltage? I've seen mine as high as 126V.

A couple CL 70 or 80 inrush current limiters will drop your mains voltage by about 4V.
post #12162 of 13371

Finally learned how to load my pictures, big thanks to (Silent One)!

 

Well, here is my set up…  Non-headphones photos so apologies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #12163 of 13371
That's amazing!
post #12164 of 13371

I also have a Pioneer SX-6000 that's in the shop for re-capping, which combo's best with my DT880 600ohms.  Photos coming soon.

post #12165 of 13371
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpeakerBox View Post

A couple of possibilities I can think of:

1.) A component has developed sensitivity to heat and breaks down after warming up (usually a transistor but not always).
2.) You have a bad cap in the power supply somewhere that won't hold a charge for very long.

Many times you can diagnose #1 by spraying cool air on the transistors one at a time to see if they recover.  For #2 look for leaking and/or bulging caps.

Can be tough to find so patience is a virtue.

I got it on the floor now and my phone plugged into it and been listening to PF Echoes and its not dropped for almost 20 minutes now. Maybe with the Gungnir on top, it does not vent well and one of the componants gets too hot but it was not hot inside and would drop only after a couple minutes. Weird...
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