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Grado 3d model

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

Hi!!

Anyone out there with a bit of 3d software experience? I would be great if we could start a database of 3d models of headphone for cnc machine milling. I for one find myself in need of a grado model (sr60,80,125,225,325 or alessandro's). And google hasn't been my friend on this one.... :P

I have no experience with this kind of software, but i'm sure it would be of great help for the comunity. :)

post #2 of 27

What exactly is it you'd like to see modelled? I could do most things that would be headphone parts but I presume you don't just want a model of the original assembly?

 

I have been planning to try CNC milling some cups for my SR80i so will be modelling possible replacements for that soon.

post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by simwells View Post

What exactly is it you'd like to see modelled? I could do most things that would be headphone parts but I presume you don't just want a model of the original assembly?

 

I have been planning to try CNC milling some cups for my SR80i so will be modelling possible replacements for that soon.



I was thinking of the original cups with the 11mm distancer modelled into them.

post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 

Bump

post #5 of 27

Modelling the original cups with the spacer added is perfectly doable but I doubt many users will have the access to that level of CNC machinery that could mill them out of a single piece, I could print them in ABS but then you're still stuck with a solid plastic body. Modelling the seperate pieces would be much more realistic for users to get made and would allow people to choose the depth to which they'd like to modify them.

post #6 of 27
Thread Starter 

That sounds reasonable, The original cups are 2 pieces right? I have access to a cnc machine so i might ask them to just do it. I would be great if you could model it. I think he won't charge me for the cups, 'cuz what takes time is the design, if so i'll make an extra couple for you wink.gif.

post #7 of 27
Thread Starter 

Bump!

post #8 of 27

Download one of the Free CAD software packages and go to town. 

 

The learning curve is somewhat steep, but you'l get there. It sounds like you are friendly with the CNC operator so have him check your work for a few beers. You will be a zillion times better off for it, at least 3.

post #9 of 27

The profile of a Grado headphone isn't very complex and it would be very easy to model in a 3D program like Solid Works, Pro Engineer, etc. If I had one of the newer Grado Models (i) I could do it in very little time, however I only have a pair of older style SR-60's.

 

I would be tougher to pick up the software if you haven't done it before. All you would have to do though would be to sketch half the profile of the shell and revolve it 360 degrees around the center axis. I am assuming that is all you would want is the outer shell and not the inner half with the driver in it?

post #10 of 27

Quote:
Originally Posted by qubyts View Post

Anyone out there with a bit of 3d software experience?


Yes, but realize that "3D" is a big world, big enough that there are specialties that hardly communicate:

 

  • Art and entertainment (movies, games, 2D fine art...)
  • Architectural visualization
  • GPGPU: all the people finding ways to use the 3D graphics processors in PCs when they're not being used for games
  • Manufacturing

 

Those of us with experience in any area but the last may not be able to help you.

 

What it comes down to, qubyts, is what format(s) your machinist can accept.

 

If he needs Pro/E or Solidworks files, you're going to have to find a professional in the field, because these packages start at about $4000, out of reach of any sane hobbyist.  That would explain your lack of answers here: such a person who is interested in your project is likely to want to make a go of it all by themselves.

 

If your machinist is willing to accept faceted models, the rest of us 3D users may be able to help you.  Or, you may be able to help yourself, with free software like Google SketchUp or Blender.  Realize that the biggest difference with these programs is that they're not intended to produce manufacturable output.  The thing is, because these other areas of 3D are getting so much bigger, a lot of manufacturing processes have evolved to be able to accept them anyway.

 

Before you ask, no, I can't make these files for you, regardless.  I had two pairs of Grados at one time, but I killed one and gave the other away.  I'd need a set on hand so I could take measurements.

post #11 of 27

I'd be happy to model the phones if you'd be willing to throw me a set of the CNC'd cans from the mill?

 

I have a pair of sr325is on hand that I can model from, will that do?

 

Find out what kind of files your machinist can accept. I'd be modeling in Rhino, so can output to a wide variety of formats.  Would also be good to know exactly how your guy wants the files set up as they usually have a very specific way they'd like them organized. 

post #12 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sakarns View Post

I'd be happy to model the phones if you'd be willing to throw me a set of the CNC'd cans from the mill?

 

I have a pair of sr325is on hand that I can model from, will that do?

 

Find out what kind of files your machinist can accept. I'd be modeling in Rhino, so can output to a wide variety of formats.  Would also be good to know exactly how your guy wants the files set up as they usually have a very specific way they'd like them organized. 

 

 

I'd be happy to do that!!!  I actually found a place that i dont need to pay at all, although i still need the model..... The input is DWG or DXF... :)
 

post #13 of 27

Thats strange. DWG or DXF are both AutoCAD files, not 3D files at all. Not sure how you would turn a 2D file into a program in MasterCAM.

 

I would have expected the necessary file to be a SLDPRT file or something similar, the 3D part file output from Solidworks, or at least an IGES file, which is a universal 3D model file (similar to how a DXF file is a universal 2D CAD file).

post #14 of 27

I've worked with CNC machinists who use DWG files.  Autocad can handle 3D data, it's just not surface based like most, but rather boundary based.  Given that CNC is a subtractive process, its perfectly reasonable to use boundary data.

 

I'll get working on the 3D model.  I should be able to have it done by the end of the week.  

post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharkz View Post

Thats strange. DWG or DXF are both AutoCAD files, not 3D files at all. Not sure how you would turn a 2D file into a program in MasterCAM.

 

I would have expected the necessary file to be a SLDPRT file or something similar, the 3D part file output from Solidworks, or at least an IGES file, which is a universal 3D model file (similar to how a DXF file is a universal 2D CAD file).


DWG files are 3D.  If one appears 2D, it's only because all the stuff is drawn in one plane.
 

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