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Mad Lust Envy's Headphone Gaming Guide: (Update: 7/9/2014: Ultrasone HFI-15G Added) - Page 685

post #10261 of 25546
Thread Starter 
Have you even looked at the first post? I had the Headzone...
post #10262 of 25546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evshrug View Post


Creative makes an X-Fi Surround 5.1 USB sound card, as well as a few other USB "sound cards" (the Recon3D would fall into this category, it's also from Creative), but in your defense I have seen the Titanium HD description text accidentally put onto a product page for the X-Fi surround 5.1 USB.
As far as movies go, DH was designed for movies and does well, and THX TruStudio Pro (which is what the Recon3D uses) was kinda designed with both gaming and movies in mind. Again, I won't say which is better since that depends on your ears, BUT I enjoy watching movies with my Recon3D and had a great time watching "Aliens" a few days ago.
As far as gaming goes, DH still applies the same sound, but has a limitation carried over from it's "designed for movie" heritage: the surround is really just a flat 2D surround to the sides, front, and back of you. Most of the time that's fine, and all that console games are capable of anyway, but for SOME games on PC, Creative's cards can create 3D surround so you can hear helicopters flying overhead or water flowing under your feet. That's a big reason Nameless prefers Creative's cards, particularly the internal X-Fi soundcards because those have the best support. Sadly though, most of the latest PC games don't offer full 3D surround as an option because the games were first designed for Xbox 360 or PS3 which only support 5.1 or 7.1 surround (2D), but if you want to play a game like Half-Life 2 or Bioshock, the 3D experience is there. I need to ask Nameless if Borderlands 2 has support for one of the 3D codecs.
So, most of the time, the U3 & Recon3D have equal surround potential, except with older games. But then, the Recon3D connects with either PC or Console, so it is more versatile, and the Recon3D also has the benefit that you can adjust settings on the PC and save them to use with your console.
Which do you think you want? The U3 is cheapest, the Recon3D works with PC and console, and apparently the Mixamp is 3x the cost. I hope I wrote clearly enough, je ne ecrit pas en français parce que je ne parle pas avec un personne pour dix ans.
Oh, and Mad did game a bit with in-ear headphones, and I've heard a few binaural (natural surround) recordings with my Etymotic ER6i IEMs. I think Mad's impressions are in his guide, I agree the soundstage is small (doesn't seem like the sounds are naturally coming from outside your head), but the illusion of direction DOES work well with detailed earphones. Astro and Etymotic both made gaming IEMs.

 

I think I will try the recon 3D ! You have convinced me ^^ As it's compatible with consoles and pc, and quite cheap, it's the best option for me!

In France I can have the mixamp for 190 euros (so expensive... astro don't sell it without a headphone and I didn't find any website to import it), and the recon 3D for 60 euros...

I will probably go with recon 3D, amp (I don't know which one for the moment but I will search) and the Q701! 

Thank you very much for yours replies!

And not bad for the French :)

post #10263 of 25546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambobbybob View Post

 

I think I will try the recon 3D ! You have convinced me ^^ As it's compatible with consoles and pc, and quite cheap, it's the best option for me!

In France I can have the mixamp for 190 euros (so expensive... astro don't sell it without a headphone and I didn't find any website to import it), and the recon 3D for 60 euros...

I will probably go with recon 3D, amp (I don't know which one for the moment but I will search) and the Q701! 

Thank you very much for yours replies!

And not bad for the French :)

Buying them from amazon.com ain't an option?

post #10264 of 25546
Quote:
Originally Posted by burritoboy9984 View Post

When you gonna start reviewing electrostats? normal_smile%20.gif I'm starting to lean towards these as my next setup. I'm scouring ebay and CL daily, lol.

 

Whenever he gets a speaker amp. Even an old integrated receiver from a thrift store or the local craigslist or something would work.

 

Otherwise, he won't be able to power the SRD-7/SB or other transformer boxes like that at all, since they're designed to connect to the speaker taps of old integrated receivers. This makes lending my prized SR-Lambda setup to him for a review pointless.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Lust Envy View Post
Whenever someone buys them for me. biggrin.gif

 

Sorry, I'm not that rich.

 

Even if I do go through with lending you my Stax setup for a review, I'd like something to review in exchange, probably your HE-400. Could be a temporary trade, unless you want both headphones side-by-side for comparison's sake.

post #10265 of 25546
Thread Starter 
I'd send you the HE-400. I was planning to soon anyways. Was gona send them out, so you, Chico, and Calpis can compare...
post #10266 of 25546

I had a hunch that's what you meant by that earlier post about the three of us having something to look forward to from you soon, but now I'm sure.

 

This ought to be an interesting introduction to orthodynamics, and also a way to find out how much planar driver designs are similar-and different-between those that use electromagnetic forces and those that use electrostatic forces to move the diaphragm.

 

As an aside, why do PS3 game patches take so long to download? Steam never takes quite this long to download gigabytes upon gigabytes of data. It's even worse when you can't multi-task during download and installation.

 

It didn't seem so bad 'til I decided to plunk down for PS+ and suddenly find myself with all these free games ready to download...

post #10267 of 25546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Lust Envy View Post

Have you even looked at the first post? I had the Headzone...

 

Not since I told you I read it about 200 pages ago. I honestly don't remember reading that part when I read the entire first post however long ago. Not sure how I missed it, lol.

 

Wonder how the Smyth compares to it, but even still, from what I've read around it takes electrostats to fully take advantage of those technologies as dynamic headphones don't get the full effect out of it.

 

-Erik

post #10268 of 25546

Just wanted to share my excitement. I just ordered all of the components including some upgrades from Mouser to build my own Objective 2 Amp.

I also ordered the chassis, front plate, knob, and PCB from JDS Labs. All done shipping and all for about $80!! L3000.gif

post #10269 of 25546
Thread Starter 


It'll be here Thursday. Couldn't resist.

Well, I'll be returning the Yuin G1A soon back to Head-Direct after that rattling and clipping. Movies were a major reason why I bought them, and they don't work for it. They do work fine for gaming and most music though. Dunno why they go haywire when watching movies.

If I manage to sell my SA-31, I'll put the ODAC for sale as well. Then I'll probably put the Magni/Modi up for sale and buy what I should've bought in the first place: the Audio-GD Compass 2 DAC/AMP.
post #10270 of 25546

1. What's wrong with your Magni/Modi combo and your Audio-GD SA-31?

 

2. How much does the Audio-GD Compass 2 cost? I can't find a quote on the Audio-GD website.

post #10271 of 25546
Thread Starter 
1. Nothing. Love both. The reason I wanna sell the SA-31 is because I want a volume knob on my main amp. The SA-31 uses volume buttons which take way too long to adjust for my taste. The SA-31 would be perfection if only it had a damn volume knob, really.

2. The Magni/Modi combo are great. This is a great setup. It's pretty neutral, but I prefer just a hint of warmth for my main headphones. Audio-GD sound is just that. I'm only selling it because I don't need them. I bought them on impulse. Couldn't resist their sexiness.

The Compass 2 is $500 (+shipping). Same price as the SA-31, except it's a DAC/AMP, whereas the SA-31 is just an amp. Because it's a DAC/AMP, I won't need the ODAC anymore. I'll put the ODAC for sale as soon as I sell the SA-31.

Lol, not even 30 minutes, and the Schiit stack is pending sale. XD
Edited by Mad Lust Envy - 12/31/12 at 7:55pm
post #10272 of 25546

Holy crap, if I had $500 to spend on just a headphone amp, I'd already have an SRM-1/Mk2 Pro or even an SRM-T1 by now...

 

Ever thought about just picking up a vintage integrated receiver to use as a headphone amp? It may be quite bulky just for that purpose, but power shouldn't be a concern.

 

Also, I thought you sold off your AKGs, but now here you are again, with the special edition K702. One of these days, I'll also have to audition the K701/K702/Q701 line (seeing as they're the common step up from the AD700), though I think I should have my SR-Lambda on hand for more in-depth comparisons.

post #10273 of 25546
Quote:
Originally Posted by NamelessPFG View Post

Holy crap, if I had $500 to spend on just a headphone amp, I'd already have an SRM-1/Mk2 Pro or even an SRM-T1 by now...

 

Ever thought about just picking up a vintage integrated receiver to use as a headphone amp? It may be quite bulky just for that purpose, but power shouldn't be a concern.

 

Also, I thought you sold off your AKGs, but now here you are again, with the special edition K702. One of these days, I'll also have to audition the K701/K702/Q701 line (seeing as they're the common step up from the AD700), though I think I should have my SR-Lambda on hand for more in-depth comparisons.

 

I've been watching this.

 

-Erik

post #10274 of 25546
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NamelessPFG View Post

Holy crap, if I had $500 to spend on just a headphone amp, I'd already have an SRM-1/Mk2 Pro or even an SRM-T1 by now...

Ever thought about just picking up a vintage integrated receiver to use as a headphone amp? It may be quite bulky just for that purpose, but power shouldn't be a concern.

Also, I thought you sold off your AKGs, but now here you are again, with the special edition K702. One of these days, I'll also have to audition the K701/K702/Q701 line (seeing as they're the common step up from the AD700), though I think I should have my SR-Lambda on hand for more in-depth comparisons.

Nah. That and I'm trying to minimalize my equipment in size and quantity (well...except headphones themselves, lol). The Schiit stack will be gone soon, and hopefully so will the SA-31, though I'm downgrading...there. biggrin.gif




BTW, updated the first post with the Yuin G1A. Played a HELL of a lot today... like literally ALL damn day, so I'm all played out for a few days. Next comes some K702/65 time, and then the A40 testing/reviewing.




Quote:


Yuin G1A (*clip-on*)



Sells for $150
Review (Click to show)
The Yuin G1A. You can say that these are the most high end clip-on headphones in the world. That sounds like hyperbole, but it's true. Clip-ons don't really have much of a market for audiophiles, and are content with staying relatively on the domestic market, and/or for physical activities. With a small niche market, the Yuin G1A sits comfortably as the most expensive and highest regarded clip-on headphone.

I am a huge fan of clip-ons. They don't hurt my ears like IEMs. They stay in place no matter what I do, short of literally touching them. They are small enough to lay down with. After a few days of adjusting to how clip-ons feel on your ears, they may as well be the most comfortable headphone design ever made.

It helps that my first experience with clip-ons was with the Koss KSC-75, which for a mere $10-$20, should be in every audiophile's inventory. The KSC-75 hits well above their price range, is extremely comfy, pleasing, and just... legendary.

My 2nd taste of clip-ons headphones was with the rare and mature KSC-35. The KSC-35 is older than the KSC-75 and discontinued everywhere, but can be bought directly from Koss on their website. The Koss KSC35 sacrifices just a little comfort in place of more musicality and warmth compared to their cheaper, and more common sibling. It's also now sold for 3x the price of the KSC-75, though I personally don't believe they should be priced so high, despite my overwhelming love for them.

So how does the Yuin G1A stack up next to the budget conscious Koss offerings? Does the overall package justify the huge price difference? Let's find out.

The package is quite small. A nicely designed cardboard box, with a nice presentation. Doesn't look as generic as the Koss packaging. Upon opening the package I am greeted by the sleek Yuin G1A.

Build Quality: The 'cups' have a sexy, brushed metal finish to them, which immediately puts it well above the KSC-35 and 75 in aesthetics. With that said, that really is the only physical aspect I find superior to the Koss clip-ons. Everything else is so ridiculously similar to the Koss clip-ons, they may as well have been made by the same OEM. The cable's only difference is that the two sides merge further down the line, making it easier to wear the G1A behind the neck, so you can take them off and let them rest on your shoulders/chest, which isn't that easy to do with the Koss clip-ons due to how close the clip-ons are to where the cables merge.

The build itself is... well, it doesn't inspire confidence. The clips are plastic (a very comfortable curved plastic), which seem like they won't take a beating the way the KSC-75's silicone/metal clips, or the sharper, stronger plastic on the KSC-35 would. The cable is quite frankly, sad. It is essentially the same thin, flimsy cable found on the Koss clip-ons. My KSC35's cable is already pulling away from the drivers, and I have feeling the same would probably happen to the G1A's cables.

The good thing about the Koss clip-ons is that their ugly 'hubcaps' aren't luxurious, so I doubt you'd fear messing them up. They are rugged to say the least. On the other hand, you have the G1A with it's amazing brushed metal finish, which might be just as sturdy, but I'd be scared to just toss them in a bag in fear of scratching them or leaving any marks whatsoever. The fact they are $150 further enhances my fears of treating them with wild abandon like I'd do with the Koss clip-ons. In the end, they are expensive, yet very cheap feeling other than the back cover. Very disappointing overall. It's fine with the Koss clip-ons, NOT so with a product this expensive.


Comfort: If there is one thing that can be said, it's that the Yuin G1A is amazingly comfortable. They literally disappeared on my ears. The most important part of a clip-on in terms of comfort is the clips. If the clips don't feel good resting on your ears, that can be quite problematic. Thankfully, the Yuin's plastic clips are smooth and curved just right. They share a very similar form factor as the KSC-75's clips, which are both quite a bit better on the ears than the KSC-35's relatively sharp-edged clips. I also like that the clips are so smooth, they easily slide on my ears. The KSC-75's rubberized clips 'grip' on my skin, so it's a little harder to put on than the Yuin clips. They are both wonderful to wear, however. As mentioned before, the small form factor, secure fit, and super comfort make these practically unrivaled in terms of long sessions, relaxing, or physical activities. As usual, clip-ons may not be the best in comfort for those who wear glasses, as they have to share the same placement on the ears.


Accessories: The only accessories is a 3.5mm to 6.3mm (1/4") adapter (the same exact one found on the HE-400, coincidentally), as well as an extra pair of foams.


Isolation/Leakage: As with the Koss clip-ons, the Yuin G1A is open backed (though they actually LOOK closed). This means that they do not isolate well, if at all. External noise will come in with very little contention. I find this to be more good than bad for my Koss clip-ons, as I'd like to be able to hear things around me when I wear my clip ons at work. However, the G1A being hard to drive for such use (more on that later), as well as my fear of physically damaging them makes their very open nature not as beneficial, seeing as the GA1 is more content being used at home with a dedicated amp.


Amping: As I briefly mentioned, the Yuin G1A is a rare breed of clip-on, in that it has a relatively high impedance of 150ohm, and take advantage of that by being harder to drive than typical clip-ons (as well as lots of full sized headphones), which results in more refinement at the expense of versatility. They don't demand a LOT of amping, but amping is necessary nonetheless. I find that it sounds cleaner with an external amp than with the Mixamp alone. Soundstage and overall positioning didn't change, but I feel the improvement in audio fidelity warrants using an amp. Still, these can be used with the Mixamp alone without much drawbacks.


Sound Signature: Before I get started on it's sound, let me state that all three clip-ons I have used can easily swap clips with the others (i.e. KSC35 with Yuin clips, G1A with KSC75 clips, etc). The problem I see with this, is that the sound signature of the headphones change quite a bit just by whatever clip you have equipped onto them. The reason being that each clip places the drivers at certain distances from the ears, which greatly vary the sound signatures. Even with the same clips, just a light bending of them will alter sound quality (easily done with the KSC75's clips). The Yuin clips can bend just a teeny bit, but be prepared to possibly break them in the process if you attempt to. The KSC35's clips don't seem to have any give whatsoever, so what you hear is what you get. For the purpose of this review, I will be rating the G1A based off it's stock clips, which I found to give the most balanced sound signature.

Now on to the sound itself. Upon first listen, the first thing I thought of was that the Yuin G1A sounded like a mini Q701. Well balanced, relatively neutral, with just a hint of warmth. Obviously lacking in soundstage, as well as being lot smaller in presentation of sound, but mini-Q701s is the best description I can come up with.


Bass: Starting with the bass, I can say that the Yuin G1A has neutral bass. The bass is neither strong nor weak. It's present, but not emphasized nor lacking. The KSC35 has more bass impact and presence by quite a bit, and the KSC75 has a slight lead in bass impact.


Mids: Really nice, balanced mids. Not forward or recessed, they sound natural and full. Some frequencies are ever so slightly forward than others, but overall, I find it well integrated with the rest of the frequencies.


Treble: Nice and smooth. SOMETIMES has some sparkle, but overall, it's presented quite naturally. A nice improvement over both the Koss clip-ons which sound grainy and unrefined next to the Yuin, especially in the treble.


Soundstage: Like the other clip-ons, the soundstage isn't big, but it's somewhat airy and spacious, still not rivaling a full-sized headphone's soundstage.


Positioning: I find the G1A to perform very similarly to the Koss clip-ons. They do good. I didn't have a problem playing competitively, though there is room for improvement.
The positional cues don't have a lot of space to work with, but with what they have, they do a good job placing sounds around you. It helps that they are a bit more clearer and fuller sounding than the Koss clip-ons, so soundwhoring is easier.


Clarity: Very clear. Very impressed with how detailed the G1A is. Detailed, and full sounding. Just a lovely balance all around, making these very good for all around gaming.


Value: It's hard to judge the Yuin G1A's value. They deliver a rich, detailed sound which is noticeably improved on what the Koss clip-ons offer. On the other hand, the improvement doesn't justify the huge price jump, nor does the shoddy build quality on the cables. I would say these would make more sense being sold at $75, and even then, they could use some improvement on the cables and perhaps the clips, even though I love the clips.


Final Impressions: The Yuin G1A is a fantastic clip on, though overpriced when everything is taken into account. They won't replace full-sized headphones in either competitive or fun gaming, but they are great alternatives if you wanna lay back and listen without the feeling of having something on your head. If you are a huge fan of the Koss clip-ons, you may wanna give the Yuin G1A a chance, as it refines and fills out the already great sound found on the budget friendly Koss offerings. Just be prepared to pay a steep price for a fractional improvement. Do I recommend it? No. The only people who should look into the Yuin G1A are those who love clip-ons and want to see what the best sounds like. Other than that, $150 gets you close to some legitimate full-sized headphones that eat the Yuin G1A alive.


Final Scores...

Fun: 7 (Good)

Competitive: 7.5 (Very Good)

Comfort: 9.5 (Amazing)

Edited by Mad Lust Envy - 12/31/12 at 10:26pm
post #10275 of 25546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Lust Envy View Post



It'll be here Thursday. Couldn't resist.

 

Sweet!

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