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Mad Lust Envy's Headphone Gaming Guide: (3/18/2016: MrSpeakers Ether C 1.1 Added) - Page 1471

post #22051 of 37428
Thread Starter 
Change, what's the diff between the K612 pads and the standard K702 pads? I ask because I find the K702 pads to be the more comfortable than the Memory foams of the Annies, due to less heat buildup.

Apparently the more recent comparison between the Annie and K712 are stating that they sound identical (via side by side comparison), leading me to believe that the Annies must have changed to K712 memory foam instead of the older flat ones, which may have given all the differences between them.
post #22052 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by avens View Post
 

 

For music and for gaming they are among one of the most boring headphones I've ever heard. Bass and bottom end in general is plainly done badly in those for a Sennheiser product and it's also one of those where they sound too airy, unnatural. Other complaints of all that line are price (the 598 is very expensive for what you get) and reliability issues (they break).

 

The thing is all that "555 line" is hyped to death because they are internet champs of non into mid or hi-fi people defending their purchase, not realizing it's on the bottom level of the sennheiser products, the ones to avoid, those made in china (the good Senn products are made in Ireland and in Germany) and those that don't get reviewed by technical sites.

 

Was reading this thread and someone even claimed that with cable and wiring modding they can get to the 600/650 level (mid-fi, a complete tier altogether), which is impossible without changing the drivers, frame design and materials; plus when modding it necessarily means losing in some aspects. It's like comparing a bmw 325 with a m5.

Furthermore, I was reading headfonia comments on this (yep I know) and someone wrote he preferred the 595 over the 800, which is the usual mistake of preferring what you use over what's being tested for 5 seconds with different music just because of being used to the former.

 

But yeah, they are pretty good for soundwhoring which is an aspect of headphones for gaming. Wouldn't recommend it to the masses for that use though, as they are really boring, technically flawed and expensive for what you get, but they do work as a one trick pony.

 

I still want to know if there really is a proper world class headphone for music (above the 600/650 and AKG level) that at the same time is great for fun gaming and for soundwhoring, all that with proper testing, comparison, setup (amp, dolby headphone dac), technical knowledge, good gameplay level and everything. There are lots of greats for both uses or one in particular, but so far none tested that's spectacular for both. I know one day someone will :P

On this the theoretical best among the usual suspects should be the HD800, but I think even that one is not really worth purchasing right now because some aspects should come improved from factory being their current top of the line.

 

Wait hold on... HD558 is expensive for its price? Really? It's $120....

Please find me a headphone for $120 or less which sounds as good as the HD558 in its own rights.

 

Sure, a lot of what you say do make sense I do agree to a fair point. Your opinion about a headphone being world class (which I assume you mean HD800 level, which I don't even think is world class personally), well... not everyone has bottomless pockets, okay? :)

post #22053 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by avens View Post
 

 

For music and for gaming they are among one of the most boring headphones I've ever heard. Bass and bottom end in general is plainly done badly in those for a Sennheiser product and it's also one of those where they sound too airy, unnatural. Other complaints of all that line are price (the 598 is very expensive for what you get) and reliability issues (they break).

 

The thing is all that "555 line" is hyped to death because they are internet champs of non into mid or hi-fi people defending their purchase, not realizing it's on the bottom level of the sennheiser products, the ones to avoid, those made in china (the good Senn products are made in Ireland and in Germany) and those that don't get reviewed by technical sites.

 

Was reading this thread and someone even claimed that with cable and wiring modding they can get to the 600/650 level (mid-fi, a complete tier altogether), which is impossible without changing the drivers, frame design and materials; plus when modding it necessarily means losing in some aspects. It's like comparing a bmw 325 with a m5.

Furthermore, I was reading headfonia comments on this (yep I know) and someone wrote he preferred the 595 over the 800, which is the usual mistake of preferring what you use over what's being tested for 5 seconds with different music just because of being used to the former.

 

But yeah, they are pretty good for soundwhoring which is an aspect of headphones for gaming. Wouldn't recommend it to the masses for that use though, as they are really boring, technically flawed and expensive for what you get, but they do work as a one trick pony.

 

I still want to know if there really is a proper world class headphone for music (above the 600/650 and AKG level) that at the same time is great for fun gaming and for soundwhoring, all that with proper testing, comparison, setup (amp, dolby headphone dac), technical knowledge, good gameplay level and everything. There are lots of greats for both uses or one in particular, but so far none tested that's spectacular for both. I know one day someone will :P

On this the theoretical best among the usual suspects should be the HD800, but I think even that one is not really worth purchasing right now because some aspects should come improved from factory being their current top of the line.

Dude, that's EXACTLY what I thought of them.

post #22054 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by benbenkr View Post
 

 

Wait hold on... HD558 is expensive for its price? Really? It's $120....

Please find me a headphone for $120 or less which sounds as good as the HD558 in its own rights.

 

Sure, a lot of what you say do make sense I do agree to a fair point. Your opinion about a headphone being world class (which I assume you mean HD800 level, which I don't even think is world class personally), well... not everyone has bottomless pockets, okay? :)

AKG K540. Sounds better than the HD558 in every way, except soundstage.

post #22055 of 37428
Thread Starter 
Yes I know the guide disappeared. Gotta look for the code that effed it up. Ugh...

I DON'T UNDERSTAND WHY A PROPER FREAKING SPOILER TAG WOULD CAUSE THE ENTIRE GUIDE TO DISAPPEAR. I MEAN IT'S NOT EVEN IN THE BEGINNING OF THE GUIDE.


FFFFUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU
Edited by Mad Lust Envy - 3/23/14 at 3:15am
post #22056 of 37428
Thread Starter 
Here, my damn A30 review. I just spent almost a damn hour trying to find what was screwing up my guide. It's fixed. I'm done for today. rolleyes.gif

Quote:
Astro A30 (*headset*)



Sells for $99.99

Where To Buy: Astrogaming.com
Review (Click to show)
The Astro A30. Astrogaming's original and still current on-ear gaming headset, released after the well known Astro A40, and aimed at gamers with a need for portability and versatility which the A40s can't provide. I was able to score the A30s for a ridiculously good deal with the Mixamp Pro (2011 version).

How does the bite size Astro headset compared to the older, immensely popular, and higher priced A40 and A50? Let's find out.



Build Quality:

Rating: Great

The A30's frame consists of mainly plastic, which feels a little cheap and less prestigious than the tank-like frames of the A40 and A50s. However, the A30's plastic is flexible and feels like it'd take much abuse with nary a complaint.

The top headband portion is matte plastic, and houses ample cloth padding on the underside on headband. While the padding is thick and springy, I personally feel it puts some annoying pressure on the top of the head. I personally feel the padding could've been spread across the entire top headband piece with less thickness and yield better results in comfort and pressure distribution.

The frame on the cup side is covered in a glossy finish, which is quite the contrast compared to the headband. Not sure why Astro decided on a clashing finish to the plastic. The outer cups sport removable speaker tags, reminiscent of the A40s. Unfortunately, removing the speaker tags expose something disappointing: the A30s are closed back regardless whether the speaker tags are on or not, which is a change from the A40s. I personally like to keep the speaker tags off, as it reduces the weight by a subtle amount (I stress the word subtle). No other benefits are gained from what I could tell.

The cups are supraaural and square in shape, including the cloth ear pads which seem to have memory foam inside. Considering the overabundance of synthetic leather pads, the cloth pads are welcome, though the square shape doesn't allow the pads to sit as well as I'd like on the ear compared to traditional round-shaped ear pads. That, and the memory foam traps some heat compared to cloth pads without memory foam.

The cups swivel inward for a flat profile when placing the around your neck, with the outer cup facing outwards. I much prefer just an inward swivel like the A30 over having a fully collapsible design which may lead to more portability at the expense of more potential breaking points.

Located on the bottom of the left cup is a silver barrel that holds the cable as well as small 2.5mm input for the removable boom microphone. The cable itself is non-removable and extremely short as it simply holds the inline mic (an alternative to the boom mic), as well as the mic/mute switch, and A/B selector switch which lets you choose between A (boom mic) and B (in line mic). The cable terminates into both a 3.5mm stereo plug as well as a 2.5mm chat plug placed side by side. There is enough distance between the two plugs to attach a 3.5mm coupler or 3.5mm extension cable if you choose to use some other cable, though it will block you from using the chat plug.

The included cable (referred to as the 'Mobile QD Cable') connects to the dual plugs on the headphone end with a pair of inputs on the control 'puck', one 2.5mm (for the mic) and the 3.5mm for audio. This end is where the 'Call / Pick up / Track Control Button' is placed for Iphone/mobile phone use. The cable is of good quality, though a bit short in length. Thankfully, an extension cable is included, which fortunately retains the mic channel.

All in all, the A30 may feel like cheap plastic overall, but it looks like it can take a ton of abuse. You would really have to commit to the act of mutilating the A30s for them to break. Under normal circumstances, these look like they'll last a lifetime.



Accessories:

I can't exactly say what comes with the A30 alone as I bought it in a bundle with the Mixamp Pro (2011 version). Depending on whether you buy the A30s alone or in a bundle, you may/may not get some of these accessories:

Boom Mic: Detachable and connects to the headphone via a 2.5mm plug. It bends, but doesn't give in easily, and doesn't retain memory all too well. You'll more than likely have to readjust the boom mic every time you attach it to the A30s.

Speaker Tags: Attaches to the cups via 4 small magnets on the corners of the tags. They are customizable (other designs can be purchased on the Astrogaming website).

Mobile QD Cable: The main cable used.

Extender Cable: 1 meter extension cable for the mobile QD cable (will more than likely work for any 3.5mm terminated cable that has both audio and chat channels, which should be most headsets that don't separate the chat and regular audio into two separate plugs.)

PC Splitter cable: Separates the audio/mic channels into two plugs. I personally did not receive this cable in my package, though the quick start guide includes it in the image.

My suspicions for Mixamp related goodies:

Optical cable
Mini usb cable
XBOX cable
3.5mm cable



Comfort:

Rating: Very Good

The Astro A30s are about as good as any on-ear headphone I've used to date in terms of comfort (with the exception of the Ultrasone HS-15, which is quite a bit more comfortable than any other on-ear I've owned). The A30s are lightweight, clamp just enough for a secure fit, and the cloth covered memory foam pads sit on the ears comfortably, though the shape of the pads make it a little harder to position properly on the ear.

The only gripes I have with the A30's comfort is the headband padding which puts some pressure on the top of the scalp, despite how well padded it is. Also, the ear pads can build up heat, though not as much as typical synthetic leather pads.



Design Issues:

Headband padding - Could stand to have been wider for better distribution of weight. The pad pushes down on the top of your head which can get a little uncomfortable.

Square ear pads - Not really an issue, but round shaped ear pads would be easier to adjust and position on the ears.

Permanently attached and incredibly short cable with in line mic and mic/mute switch - The design seems cumbersome. This could've easily been remedied by just having two detachable cables: One with the the mic and switches, and another standard cable.



Isolation/Leakage:

Rating: Decent

It's passable for a closed headset. It doesn't leak in or out a ton, but it doesn't work all that well either way. If you're using the A30s next to someone sleeping, you're sure to bother them, and in loud rooms, they won't block out outside noise as much as I'd hope.



Microphone:

Rating: Decent

The A30 comes with both a removable boom mic as well as a cable with an inline mic. I found both microphones to perform decently in personal tests. In other tests with a good friend of mine, I was told the boom mic came out clearly though came off a bit bright and artificial sounding. The inline mic sounded more natural to him at the expense of a little vocal clarity. He preferred I'd use the inline mic, due to the brightness and artificial tone of the boom mic. To compare, I was told that the V-moda BoomPro microphone blew both of the A30's mics out of the water.



Sound:

Rating: Okay

A bit thin, lacking in definition, clarity, and dimensionality. The positive aspect of it's sound is it's bass, which while a little lacking in control, is lively and quite enjoyable for music. The A30 performs at it's best for energetic, bassy music from my experience which highlight the bass and treble moreso than the details in the mids. Let me explain a bit further below...



Bass:

Rating: Decent

On one hand, the A30's bass is not what I consider heavily emphasized, but on the other hand, it's rumbly, a bit loose, yet still on the dry side. It may lack control, speed, and quick decay, and can at times, creep up and rob some of the mid's clarity and presence. The A30 is a dry, somewhat thin sounding headphone which doesn't quite match up with it's rumbly bass. That type of bass doesn't usually associate itself with thin sounding headphones. When music gets busy with a lot of bass, the A30s can distort and scramble up the bass with other details. I have to say, despite it's flaws, it's still the best part of the A30s for me. The bass is enjoyable even if it doesn't maintain control like other headphones with this level of bass prominence.



Mids:

Rating: Okay

The mids are dry, thin and a bit diffused sounding which gives way to the somewhat peaky treble. I have to say it's a bit disappointing, as it comes off a bit stunted and lacking in definition, sharpness and clarity.

Dolby Headphone tends to add some warmth and smoothness to the presentation of any and every headphones, and in the case of the A30s, robs it even more of it's clarity (or lack thereof). This is but one reason why I don't find the A30s to match up well with Dolby Headphone, which is the surround processor the Mixamp uses, and is typically bundled with the A30s.



Treble:

Rating: Decent

The treble is another aspect of the A30s that I somewhat like, though at times becomes harsh/sibilant and distorts at higher volumes. It sparkles on a frequent basis lending some air to the presentation. The treble comes out as the cleanest area in the frequency response. It matches up more with the bass than the mids.



Soundstage:

Rating: Mediocre

The A30s soundstage comes off very flat and lacking in dimension, depth, and width. This is without a doubt the most disappointing aspect of it's sound to me. As usual, I don't find much to complain about in stereo, as most headphones sound a bit two dimensional/linear to me, with most sounds placed in a straight line between my ears. The problem with the A30s is that the imaging mostly comes off as 3 different points in and between the head: the left, center, right. The transition between the left/center/right seem imprecise to my ears with some gaps in between those extremes. Using virtual surround didn't help matters much. The soundstage remained fairly linear with a notable lack of depth. A lack of depth doesn't translate well for positional cues.



Positioning:

Rating: Mediocre

The soundstage and imprecise imaging did not benefit greatly from virtual surround, making positional cues a bit hard to locate. I found the A30s to be one of the hardest headphones to use for gaming, as front positional cues and rear cues were not easy to discern, and linear soundstage choked any potential possible out of the A30s for competitive gaming.



Clarity:

Rating: Okay

The slow bass, hazy mids, distorted at times treble, and non-dimensional soundstage, robbed any hopes of great clarity out of the A30s. It's not muffled sounding for music (really, the A30s can be quite enjoyable for the right kind of music). It can come off a bit energetic in the bass and treble, but as far as minute details and gaming friendliness, the A30s fall short.



Amping:

Not necessary



Personal Recommendation?

Movies, Music, In General? Small Maybe
Gaming? No

Though I try to find the good aspects of any headphone/headset I review, the Astro A30 is a headphone I find hard to recommend. The headset alone falls in a price range that stack it up against headsets like the Skullcandy Slyr which trounce the A30 in every way other than size and perhaps durability. I find it pretty uninspired for gaming purposes in any shape or form, with average to subpar performance for both stereo and virtual surround gaming.

The A30s definitely works best for music, and even then it lags behind it's cousin: the Skullcandy Slyr. If you happen to own the A30s, you may like it for music use (I do find some enjoyment), though there are better headphones for much less (i.e. Koss KSC75, KSC35, Sportapro, Portapro, Ultrasone HS-15).

The only way I'd ever recommend getting the Astro A30 is if you find the A30/Mixamp bundle for a really good deal (at the time of purchase, I got my combo for $80 which is $120 off the standard price. The Mixamp alone is worth getting for that price, so I considered the A30s as a free bonus).



Comparisons:

At the time of review, I only had the DNA On Ear and Ultrasone HS-15 as 'fair' comparisons, as they are both closed, on ear headsets (though the DNA On Ear is a headset in functionality, not form, due to it's inline mic, and possibility to be used with the V-moda BoomPro.)

Monster DNA On Ear: The Monster DNA really makes the A30 sound like a very poor alternative, though considering the DNA On Ear's price, it better be. That being said, the DNA On Ear can be found as low as $30 more than the A30s, and the performance gain is worth every bit of that and then some. The DNA On Ear is fuller, more immersive, and considerably more natural sounding than the A30s, despite it's bass heavy tuning. The mids and treble are considerably better integrated and fleshed out. The positional cues aren't as 'sharp' as the A30s, but easier to locate in the virtual landscape in any case. The Monster DNA On Ear is, for all intents and purposes, clearly superior over the A30s.

Ultrasone HS-15: The Ultrasone HS-15 feels more comparable to the A30 performance-wise, but at less than half the cost and different tonality. The Ultrasone HS-15 is warm, and oddly recessed sounding (I blame S-logic) with some treble peakiness. Despite it's generally mellow tone (other than the sizzly treble), the HS-15 is considerably better for gaming, with a much more rounded off soundstage and decent positional cues. The HS-15 is also a noticeable step up in comfort due to a nearly non-existent weight and amazingly comfortable pads. The bass in particular really, really tramples all over the A30's bass (as well as many other headphone's bass presentation). The A30's brighter signature does sound subjectively clearer than the HS-15's mellow tone which at times can sound muffled in comparison. The Ultrasone HS-15 costs as low as 1/5th the price of the A30s, and in my opinion is the better headset.



Final Impressions:

I wanted to like the A30s, and give it a somewhat positive review. Really. Yet, reality proved that some headphones just don't stack up to the competition, the A30s being a forgettable headset that should be passed on by most people other than those who can score them for a very low price.



Final Scores...

Fun: 6/10 Decent (Click to show)
While the bass is pretty enjoyable, the lack of dimensionality and generally lackluster sound make the A30s a bit hard to enjoy for anything other than some bassy music genres, like Trap.

Competitive: 5/10 Mediocre (Click to show)
The lack of depth and subpar positional cues really disappointed me. If you're interested in the A30s, focus on stereo/media use, and less on competitive gaming.

Comfort: 7.25/10 Good (Click to show)
One of the best on ear headphones in terms of comfort. On ear headphones will generally lose some points compared to circumaural headphones, due to the constant pressure on the ears. However, the A30s can be worn for hours on end, and the cloth padding is a much needed contrast to the copious amount of synthetic leather padded headphones in the market. If the headband padding were a little more comfortable and if the ear pads were round in shape, the comfort could've been great.

Overall: 5.75/10 Okay (Click to show)
My recommendation: Only get the A30s only if you buy it in a Mixamp bundle for a very good deal. Otherwise, look elsewhere.
post #22057 of 37428

I have one question. First let me describe my situation:

I currently own 360 and PC. For pc I have Xonar DG and for 360 I have nothinh. Just a splitter which gives me 1vga cable and 2 rca cables for stereo. I am just using CAL! with either pc front jack or disconnect and contnect into those 2 rca cables via simeple rca to jack, if I want to use headphones on either 360 or pc. Same goes to speakers.

 

now, that 360 will be exchanged to ps4 soon (maybe) and I've been thinking about setup here. The point is that ps4 will be used via dvi cable on my monitor and as for sound it have optical out. Now how and to what I connect that?

Do I need asus u7? or some of fiio products? I don't have a big budget sadly and dont mind switching cables (but would love not to but I know its hard without full blown expensive receiver like yamaha).

Good dolby headphone would be great too. My xonar dg already supports it but it sound muddy... the surrond effects works but it sound like underwater.

edit: note - I love my cal! headphones and if only headband would be more comfortable :P

So how do I connect ps4 optical, pc, headphones and speakers with possibly least switching (but I can switch some if needed) and dolby headphone ?

edit2:Maybe mixamp is what I need? it's very difficult to get in Poland tho. Maybe I could order one from usa ? (if its what I need)


Edited by HiCZoK - 3/23/14 at 4:21am
post #22058 of 37428

Hi Mad Lust Envy,

 

I'm actually thinking that if you  if possible, also include (in the future) the sound quality of microphones that can be used for online chat? Personally I think that microphone quality is also as integral as the sound quality in terms of a hardcore gamer. :floatsmile: 

 

 

Edit: Rate them out of ten.


Edited by ChrisRPM12 - 3/23/14 at 5:57am
post #22059 of 37428
Thread Starter 
Im not gonna rate them on a numbered scale anymore, as there is too much room for error. I am rating them. Just havent had much chances since I havent had a headset in awhile other than the A30.

People focus way too much on numbers. To me, there is bad, mediocre, okay, decent, good, great, amazing, and...well perfection.
post #22060 of 37428

Bad being 1-4

Mediocre being 5

Okay being 6

Decent being 7

Good being 8

Great being 9

Amazing being 10

and Perfection being 11, right?

 

 

We still got those numbers!  :darthsmile:

post #22061 of 37428
Thread Starter 
Not quite but close.

I don't like numbers because people have blinders on and only seem to look at 8s and 9s as good. This is basically my experiences on evsry review site I've been too. Somehow, anything less than 8 is not good. That to me is just a stupid mindset. Thats why I prefer using the term GOOD, instead of a number that they'll ignore.
Edited by Mad Lust Envy - 3/23/14 at 10:31am
post #22062 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Change is Good View Post

Good to know.

And speaking of issues, I really hope AKG addresses the K545. That was a damn good headphone.... and I only heard one side! lol

 

I had issues with the 812. Once the headphone itself, then a few weeks afterwards the cable which wasn't properly built. And they ask 200 Dollars for a freaking cable. Sure, such things happen but there's a general lack of consistency in the manufacturing process, especially inside of the earpads whos "bumpers" are uneven and can stick in the hearing area. Unacceptable for this price. Yeah, there were Audezes with dead channels left or right or even both but this is AKG. A K G.

 

God bless Germany. :evil: (except Sennheiser earpad/headband prices)

post #22063 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiCZoK View Post
 

I have one question. First let me describe my situation:

I currently own 360 and PC. For pc I have Xonar DG and for 360 I have nothinh. Just a splitter which gives me 1vga cable and 2 rca cables for stereo. I am just using CAL! with either pc front jack or disconnect and connnect into those 2 rca cables via simeple rca to jack, if I want to use headphones on either 360 or pc. Same goes to speakers.

 

now, that 360 will be exchanged to PS4 soon (maybe) and I've been thinking about setup here. The point is that PS4 will be used via DVI cable on my monitor and as for sound it have optical out. Now how and to what I connect that?

Do I need Asus u7? or some of Fiio products? I don't have a big budget sadly and dont mind switching cables (but would love not to but I know its hard without full blown expensive receiver like Yamaha).

Good Dolby headphone would be great too. My Xonar DG already supports it but it sound muddy... the surround effects works but it sound like underwater.

edit: note - I love my cal! headphones and if only headband would be more comfortable :P

So how do I connect ps4 optical, pc, headphones and speakers with possibly least switching (but I can switch some if needed) and Dolby headphone ?

edit2:Maybe mixamp is what I need? it's very difficult to get in Poland tho. Maybe I could order one from USA ? (if its what I need)

 

 

With gaming consoles (like the PS4) you want to use something like the Astro Mix-amp.

 

With the Xonar DG.

Did you disable the motherboard on-board audio? in the BIOS

Delete the Asus drivers and install the Unified Xonar Drivers.

http://maxedtech.com/asus-xonar-unified-drivers/

post #22064 of 37428

yes. Onboard is disabled. I am using original drivers from asus site. heard about those unified drivers. Is that latest version on the site? Do I need to delete original drivers in a specific way?

And what settings to use then ? So I am good with xonar dg as for pc sound card and dolby headphone on pc? It failed on me a couple of times but I had to change pci slot and reinstall windows... that card is weird but it works well now and was cheap!

 

I was worried that mixamp might be the best way for dolby headphone on console because it's expensive to export it from USA/GB to Poland. Even tho its only 130$, it would be like 200$ with shipping and 200$ is my weekly salary in Polish currency :P

So no cheaper (available in Poland maybe) alternatives for DH on console?

 

What if I wanted to drop DH on console and just wanted to decode optical into analog headphones ?

What would be recommended DAC/external soundcard then ? Maybe I could get everything in one bag and buy something like x-fi hd or one of external xonar cards for the job? Something that Could be used passively on console (with power from usb on console or outlet, without pc running on) and also be a dac or sound card for pc. u7? omni? x-fi hd? or others?

Or stay with xonar dg on pc (or something else if its bad) and just get some simple dac for ps4 like d03 which just converts optical ?

what about turtle beach dss/dss2 ?


Edited by HiCZoK - 3/23/14 at 12:55pm
post #22065 of 37428

Here is my CAL!2 with the boompro : It beats your DNA monster pro!!!

 

 

 

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