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Shure SRH 940 impression and support thread - Page 63

post #931 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post




Okay, thanks for the confirmation. It's kind of odd how during 'normal wear' folding it makes the ear pads face away from you. I think most headphones that swivel flat have the ear pads face towards you.

 


Heya,

 

I can't think of a single 90 degree swivel headphone that doesn't face the drivers up instead of down when you drop them to your neck. It's why I wear all of mine backwards when portable.

 

The only time I see a swivel headphone's back plates when they swivel is when placing them on a desk, then their driver is facing down. When wearing them and you do that, the driver faces up.

 

I don't see why they don't all have 180 degree swivel. It can't be an engineering problem.

 

Very best,

 

post #932 of 3844



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by baka1969 View Post



You can try the bass mod to the 940 and maybe you'll like the results?


 I still don't think that the mod will bring the 940s to a setting that will be different.

Also, I wouldn't want to mess with the high spectrum by taming it a bit.

And... I'm lazy, so I guess it's easier just swapping headphones than adding/removing putty :-p

 

 

Thanks.

post #933 of 3844


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MalVeauX View Post



 

Heya,

 

Get an XB500 for cheap. It will cover your electronic music needs. If you want refinement, it'll cost you an Ultrasone Pro 900. Everything else can be done with the Shure SRH940 and a basshead headphone like the XB500/HFI580/Pro900.

 

Very best,
 

 

 

Still didn't got my srh940 (waiting a friend that travel to bring them to me) , and already learning  that the pro 900 might be my next buy. Crying ...

Well I'll  test these srh940 first, maybe I don't need that much bass . My current reference for bass is the IEM senn IE7. What I  want is a minimal impact, thump.
 

 

post #934 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by extrabigmehdi View Post


 

 

Still didn't got my srh940 (waiting a friend that travel to bring them to me) , and already learning  that the pro 900 might be my next buy. Crying ...

Well I'll  test these srh940 first, maybe I don't need that much bass . My current reference for bass is the IEM senn IE7. What I  want is a minimal impact, thump.
 

 


Heya,

 

The SRH940 does bass, but in a natural and neutral way, not in an over emphasized subwhoofer way. Pro 900's are like subwhoofers on your ears, but more like tightly controlled ones. XB500's are like subwhoofers on your ears, less controlled, and very gnarly, but they can be tightened up with EQ settings and a wee bit of amplification to speed the driver's recovery. If you at all need pounding bass, the SRH940 isn't going to deliver that. If you wear the Pro 900's or XB500's for 5 minutes and listen to some tracks with a lot of bass in them, really low bass especially, and then immediately switch to the SRH940, you'll notice starkly the difference and how the bass disappears. It's there, but it's just not as forward at all, so it seems to disappear, then you listen more and your ears tune in as they get over being over-bassed and you realize the bass is there, it's just not as in focus, and instead, you're hearing a huge lively forward mid range and some bright highs without sibilance.

 

I was listening to some Buckethead with my Pro 900's and SRH940's and really preferred the Pro 900's for that kind of bassy guitar stuff. But when it comes to acoustic and female vocals, the Pro 900's play second fiddle to my SRH940's which are far better at that. Basically, if you like bass, Pro 900's, and if you like mids, SRH940's.

 

Very best,

 

post #935 of 3844

I was listening to the 940s last night through a vintage Harmon/Kardon receiver, using the warm iStreamer DAC, and the 940s actually had quite strong bass. The contrast to listening to the 940s straight through an iPod was stark.

 

The bass weight was also greater than my Grado SR60s through the same setup. (And of course, the texture and extension on the 940s were way better.)

post #936 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalVeauX View Post




Heya,

 

The SRH940 does bass, but in a natural and neutral way, not in an over emphasized subwhoofer way. Pro 900's are like subwhoofers on your ears, but more like tightly controlled ones. XB500's are like subwhoofers on your ears, less controlled, and very gnarly, but they can be tightened up with EQ settings and a wee bit of amplification to speed the driver's recovery. If you at all need pounding bass, the SRH940 isn't going to deliver that. If you wear the Pro 900's or XB500's for 5 minutes and listen to some tracks with a lot of bass in them, really low bass especially, and then immediately switch to the SRH940, you'll notice starkly the difference and how the bass disappears. It's there, but it's just not as forward at all, so it seems to disappear, then you listen more and your ears tune in as they get over being over-bassed and you realize the bass is there, it's just not as in focus, and instead, you're hearing a huge lively forward mid range and some bright highs without sibilance.

 

I was listening to some Buckethead with my Pro 900's and SRH940's and really preferred the Pro 900's for that kind of bassy guitar stuff. But when it comes to acoustic and female vocals, the Pro 900's play second fiddle to my SRH940's which are far better at that. Basically, if you like bass, Pro 900's, and if you like mids, SRH940's.

 

Very best,

 



No, you'll hear how it appears, as music! .... Instead of an emphasized part of frequency response that's not really that cool. :)

 

Also, I would think that if people liked bass, the instrument, and to hear what the player has to offer, they would prefer the 940's by a LARD BOTTOM margin. Just guessing though, since I haven't tried it...

 

I think 'mids' is 90% of music, give or take a little depending on where you draw the lines up and down the FR. I'd happily live with a headphone that drops 50db at 40Hz if it only did the rest accurately instead of messing everything up, as most bass-heavy/extended headphones do. 

 

I don't understand the logic that bass-heavy music needs bass-heavy headphones. That's simply too much bass. I only understand if you want that head throbbing feeling of being in a club. I never hear the musical content in a club, to the point of not even being able to identify the song, only an annoying frequency that gives me nausea. :( ... **** I'm 24 and I feel old for saying that!

post #937 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by electropop View Post

I don't understand the logic that bass-heavy music needs bass-heavy headphones. That's simply too much bass. I only understand if you want that head throbbing feeling of being in a club. I never hear the musical content in a club, to the point of not even being able to identify the song, only an annoying frequency that gives me nausea. :( ... **** I'm 24 and I feel old for saying that!


Heya,

 

Some people like bass, and some people are bassheads. I'm a basshead who went with a SRH940 on top of my Ultrasone Pro 900 because I wanted a headphone for vocals, acoustic, etc, something with forward mids/highs. See my thoughts in my review linked in my signature for the Shure 940. It's a phenomenal can. When I listen to electronic though, and even some newer rock/metal, I reach for my Pro 900's instead because I like to feel the visceral bass of the Pro 900 with that stuff. But that's my preference. My previous comment was to relate that of the stark bass difference between the two headphones. Yes, the SRH940's have bass and extend very low indeed, but they don't hit hard and low like a Pro 900 does. They're not supposed to. It's why I have both headphones, they're starkly contrasted. We talk a lot about the bass of a headphone here, and people interested are seeing comments that the SRH940 has great bass, and someone who likes bass more than just being accurate, but feeling crazy bass, is not going to think these have super bass, they're going to think they're bass lite upon first listen because they're expecting a head pounding like the Pro 900 gives or XB500.

 

I feel sorry that you get nauseated by bass in clubs. It must be very embarrassing for you to go out. tongue_smile.gif

 

Very best,

post #938 of 3844

Sorry, I always rant about that stuff. :)

 

Yes, your point is perfectly valid and I understood everything. I'm just sort of criticizing the cultural paradigm that is "head throbbing bass". I like to educate people to listen to the musical content of a song instead of seeking for that certain "feeling". The Pro900, for instance, has very much trouble distinguishing changes in pitch in bass, and other areas as well. I like to talk about "crazy bass" as in "wow you can hear whatever this dude is playing!". I learned to like the instrument in a whole new light when I moved to bass-lighter cans, like the K272HD, which is my current preference. (Not to say all bass-light cans are better in this)

Then again, I don't listen to much modern music. I know the electronic stuff is mostly quite monotonic, so playing a note to the pitch isn't too important, but anyway...

 

If you want a good mix of both however, I think you'd like the LCD-2. I sold mine for their shortcomings in two weeks, but it does many things quite good.


Edited by electropop - 8/11/11 at 1:31am
post #939 of 3844

There is a good argument to be had for visceral bass I say.  Headphones by nature lack the visceral qualities that full-size speakers have, so you'd want a bit of that bass emphasis to give a punch-- especially for kick drums in rock songs, or synthesized low notes in rap or electronic or whatever else.  I personally feel any rock being played through a headphone is rather lifeless unless I feel the thump of the drums.  Too bad the thump isn't in my chest like in rock concerts with a full-sized speaker array and subs!

post #940 of 3844

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by electropop View Post


I think 'mids' is 90% of music


I don't know what we were arguing about before about neutrality when we have the exact same opinion about mids. I don't really want to drag this topic anymore but I believe we generally have an agreement about how music is supposed to be presented. However, I do have to add that not all bass-oriented sounds are just meant to be just heard to make music sound warm. Many bass sounds lower than those of the typical bass guitar notes (bass drum, electronic, movie explosions, etc.) are used for their visceral character and, IMO, many headphones just fail in that aspect. Most open headphones fail to reproduce intended visceral bass and usually closed headphones have the advantage there. I don't want to get into a closed vs. open debate since almost everyone is aware of the disadvantages and advantages of each. Anyways, cutting out subbass from headphones is a preference and certainly shouldn't be an aim. Also, having treble bleed into music is just as bad (IMO worse) than having bass bleed into music. Having everything sound unintentionally piercing is incredibly unnatural, distracting and unpleasant, but some people like that "detail."


Edited by wind016 - 8/11/11 at 4:10am
post #941 of 3844

ok ive had 2 days to evaluate my 940s... these comments may help those who are wanting to upgrade from the 440s.

 

440 vs 940... big difference with the 940s winning on everything. but if you want mid bass impact... the 440s are just more fun straight out of the laptop or an ipod. i have an ipod video and a macbook.

 

the 940s have more detail. better extension on the lows vs the 440s. but the fun factor is just not there if what you are looking for is visceral impact on mid bass. 

 

now i also got a fiio e11 through the mail yesterday... now amped (at least with the fiio... not experienced with other portable amps)... the 940s clearly beat the 440s on everything. including fun factor. mid bass impact is now there (even with the fiio e11 EQ on "0" or flat). 

 

just hope this helps those on the fence. i was a few days ago until i got my new gear.

post #942 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by wind016 View Post

 


I don't know what we were arguing about before about neutrality when we have the exact same opinion about mids. I don't really want to drag this topic anymore but I believe we generally have an agreement about how music is supposed to be presented. However, I do have to add that not all bass-oriented sounds are just meant to be just heard to make music sound warm. Many bass sounds lower than those of the typical bass guitar notes (bass drum, electronic, movie explosions, etc.) are used for their visceral character and, IMO, many headphones just fail in that aspect. Most open headphones fail to reproduce intended visceral bass and usually closed headphones have the advantage there. I don't want to get into a closed vs. open debate since almost everyone is aware of the disadvantages and advantages of each. Anyways, cutting out subbass from headphones is a preference and certainly shouldn't be an aim. Also, having treble bleed into music is just as bad (IMO worse) than having bass bleed into music. Having everything sound unintentionally piercing is incredibly unnatural, distracting and unpleasant, but some people like that "detail."

 

I don't like to think that we argued, just tried to make each of our own views more clear to the other :)

 

About neutrality, for your clarification, just one more time normal_smile%20.gif: my point was that it doesn't matter as long as coloration is within acceptable limits, so that changes in pitch, across all frequencies, are discernible. 

 

I have to agree with you about the point that headphones just can not give that thud you feel from being close to a live band playing. Amplified music should not be discussed in this sense. You feel the bass-drum and all that with the rest of your body, not just with your ears. So unless you were to strap music-synchronized vibrators across your torso, it'd be impossible to go after that effect. I agree that it shouldn't be an aim to cut it out, sure it should be heard (only heard) as well, but NEVER at the expense of clear notes. Given the price-category we're discussing here, I'd say musical accuracy has been prioritized over extreme bass-extension. Actually even with the LCD-2, the bass wasn't perfect and to me it seemed that prioritizing flat extension over "musical accuracy" had its downsides... People will argue about this :) 

Out of the headphones I've tried, HD800 has been the best combination of bass clarity and extension.

 

Previously mentioned issues is why I've given up on this whole "live feeling from a headphone". With headphones it's of utmost importance that you hear everything instead of going after a certain physical feeling. If I can hear everything to the note, the music has more of a chance to emotionally touch me. If i hear monotonic bass, I yawn and fall asleep.

 

 

post #943 of 3844

Many people will disagree with you on that.  :)  And outside of acoustic, there is no universally objective qualities that make a headphone better than another.  Music is highly subjective in that matter.


Edited by TMRaven - 8/11/11 at 12:12pm
post #944 of 3844

But pitch-accuracy is objective. You can put a musically educated person to tab songs with different headphones and some will be good and others fall short... To put things into perspective.

 

How you interpret music is a complete different matter. 95% of the people only listen to the main melody of a song. 95% of hifi-enthusiasts listen to sound rather than music, which is only used as a tool to evaluate more toys :) 

 

If you can't hear what the art, which is music, wants to portray, it doesn't matter. Culture often defies art. As I said, I fight against this cultural paradigm, which is throbbing bass, since the real deal seems to be be void to many. If people see this offensive, I'm ready to go PM, heh. So let's stay with the subject...

 

I'm still disappointed people have not viewed the SRH940 in this regard, though many spewed adjectives seem to promise good (to me, subjective, etc.) things. 

post #945 of 3844

I have a question. Has anyone tryed the 940's for home cinema and movies?

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