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Shure SRH 940 impression and support thread - Page 134

post #1996 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooko View Post


 

You said "bass-heavy" - that's what I responded to .......

 

And if you are going to try the 940's I'll be interested in your impressions.  Very warm forward mids, well extended sub-bass, recessed mid-bass, very extended and detailed highs - I would call them very coloured - warm with a dryish (but not grainy) top-end.  With all the emphasis on the top end - and missing mid-bass - they give the impression of being a little bass light.

 

Hardly what you described in your graph/text.  But then again I owned them ....


I was basing neutral as having a flat response at 0db. Unless flat is -10db these are rather flat/neutral. And that is what i want in headphones. To much bass is a bad thing. And the shure srh840 has a little to much bass for me. But when i get my next paycheck i will be ordering these and impressions will follow.

 

Expect a review by december.

 


Edited by bcasey25raptor - 11/4/11 at 1:17am
post #1997 of 3844
While the SRH940 have good clarity, it still not on the level of full-size open backs (come close but not enough) and electrostatics (nope, no can do here). It's a great pair of headphones but its lacking one very important factor which made me choose the DT150 over it.

On most recording, it just sounds bland and boring. The treble spike is fun to listen to for a while but after 40 mins or so, its hard to stand (ES10 have the same problem for me with its bass hump).

One thing that is note worthy is the build quailty of the phones. I was expecting a better finish, the silver plastic combined with the mold seams makes it tacky and cheap looking. The seam are far more noticeable than the SRH840 due to the colour and for one I am not sure how long the paint will last too.

I would say its a big improvement over the SRH840 in fit and comfort, but the sound is just too different to call it a straight upgrade.

Good treble, spacious sound but lacking the thumps. For general music listening, IMO the SRH840 is more enjoyable save you may get a broken neck and cracked skull.
post #1998 of 3844

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by achristilaw View Post

  Anyone have a Yamamoto HA-02? You have to pair them with the 940's....auditory ambrosia.
 

 

Thanks for the tip, it's not everyday it crosses your mind to pair a $950 made in Japan tube amplifier with the $250 Shure SRH-940, ya know.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ra97oR View Post

While the SRH940 have good clarity, it still not on the level of full-size open backs (come close but not enough) and electrostatics (nope, no can do here). It's a great pair of headphones but its lacking one very important factor which made me choose the DT150 over it.

On most recording, it just sounds bland and boring.


The AD1000PRM is really that exciting huh? ;)

 

Makes sense though, I wouldn't expect the 940 to compete with SA-5000, AD1000, AD2000 et cetera.

 

 

 

post #1999 of 3844

The 940s are technically better than the ad2000 IMO though. Thats if we were just talking about detail alone. 

post #2000 of 3844

 

Wait... in which department is the 940 better than the AD2000?!

 

 

post #2001 of 3844

The AD2000 isn't a detail focused headphone and since the hd600s were a little more detailed than the ad2000s when i compared them back then and the srh940s were more detailed than the hd600s when i compared them recently, I am just basing it on that. AD2000s however are more tightly focused and punchier with a slightly colored midrange making instruments larger than life. I think most people might the ad2000s the funner headphone to listen to while the shures will be better as a studio monitor like it was designed for. With that being said, I also feel that I haven't listened to the shures at their full potential since I just realized that the fiio E9 I was using with them doesn't sound that great with any other low impedance headphone and that in itself gave my hd600s that I were comparing them to a slightly unfair advantage.

post #2002 of 3844

Well, I'd want to suggest a basic improvement for FREE. This would improve the presence of bass, soundstage, and makes the highs more natural.

 

Inside the DSP  chain of foobar I have two DSP active:
 

preferences.jpg

In order to enable  sheppi inside foobar , you must use the free foo_vst component (or vst adapter). Sheppi is a free vst, search with google.

Here's how I've configured sheppi:

 

sheppi.jpg

 

Please notice that I've enabled the sheppi EQ, and that I'm limiting the ambiance effect below 1000 hz. This way, I  increase the perceived bass presence, and soundstage.

I  avoid applying  the ambiance effect for the highs (-12 db for the high band).

 

Now regarding treble, ideally I  would decrease  it at 9k, but only a 10k slider is available with the built in foobar equalizer.

 

equalizer.jpg

 

I'm sure there would be a lot less complains with this.


Edited by extrabigmehdi - 11/4/11 at 9:07am
post #2003 of 3844

First of all, all listening impressions -- whether from me, you, or some other guy -- are always half subjective and half objective. Half of what gives us sound is the headphones, and the other half is our ears, which obviously differ from person to person. I find most frustrated/dismissive/argumentative comments come from the mistaken idea that anyone can make a 100% objective judgment about any sound equipment.

 

For that reason, for a piece of equipment that measures as "neutral" by some criteria, everyone's going to hear that "neutral" slightly differently -- because of their ears, of course -- and it will not sound neutral to everybody. And how do you know that you are capturing all the relevant sound characteristics with your chosen criteria?

 

I think you should keep all of this in mind when you say "Why do people on this site hate treble so much" and "I really need to question the merit of people on here." The folds of skin around your ear, or something inside your ear canal, is obviously a bit distinctive in you if you find that most sound enthusiasts (Head-Fi members are not just ordinary people) differ from you.

 

I've listened to these headphones pretty much daily for three months, and I'm not a moron or deaf. I do prefer a slightly warm sound for long-term listening because I find it less fatiguing. This probably just means that my ears hear treble more strongly than you.

 

You might want to start with a more charitable, and probably accurate, interpretation like this rather than dismissing others.

 

Since you like treble, you'll probably like these headphones. While the treble is strong, it is not harsh.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post

Are you sure?

graphCompare.php?graphType=0&graphID[]=3101
Except for a spike at 9khz it still recesses by a good 5 db. Why do people on this site hate treble so much. Boosted treble would be above 0db. The treble on these look rather flat and neutral (TRUE NEUTRAL)

 

And guys there is still boasted midbass. By about 3db. There is no neutral to some people and colored to others. Neutral is a straight line.

 

This graph shows a recession in sub bass, flat mids, slightly boasted midbass, and recessed treble. I really need to question the merit of people on here about their knowledge on audio and how it should sound.

 

 

I would also like to point out that the shure srh840 is a colored bass heavy headphone.



 

post #2004 of 3844

That's exactly how I hear them, too.

 

What measurement captures something like dryness? Is there one?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooko View Post


 

You said "bass-heavy" - that's what I responded to .......

 

And if you are going to try the 940's I'll be interested in your impressions.  Very warm forward mids, well extended sub-bass, recessed mid-bass, very extended and detailed highs - I would call them very coloured - warm with a dryish (but not grainy) top-end.  With all the emphasis on the top end - and missing mid-bass - they give the impression of being a little bass light.

 

Hardly what you described in your graph/text.  But then again I owned them ....



 

post #2005 of 3844

  Your not going to EQ your way to bliss people. Neutrality is just that....neutral! These are quite neutral! Neutral in a transducer means you can discern the rest of the chains performance far easier. 

 

  You can whip your I-Pud to a frenzy and still not glimpse the end of the rainbow. Yes, these are a cheap phone but scale well (quite well actually) with better gear.

 

  The best synergy with these is not going to be found in manipulating the frequency response, rather try complimenting the 940's natural attributes (speed, clarity and natural balance) with gear that runs in the same direction. You can get great results with the little K.I.C.A.S. or something similar as an amp. If they were actually "bright" or "bass light" then you would choose gear or equalize to your hearts content...that isn't the case here.

 

  CHOOSE another phone that best anticipates your electronic Music's needs or requirements.

 

  I like them slightly better than the AD2K...(nice openness to that phone). The 940 is much more comfortable. The AD2K was not as fast and the bass lagged behind a bit......a little plummy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #2006 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan S View Post

That's exactly how I hear them, too.

 

What measurement captures something like dryness? Is there one?
 



 



Dryness usually happens when the air is sucked out of the highest frequencies. In the case of these shures, It is due to the 9khz peak. Remember that after a peak is a big slope going down. The uppermost frequencies of the shures are there all the way up but the peak masks that extension a little since the sound becomes a little more focused on that part of the highs.

post #2007 of 3844

 

Guys, there are tons of headphones with a 10kHz spike, even the Etymotic ER-4 which was supposedly designed for analytical FLAT listening.

 

 

 

post #2008 of 3844

Yup most of those cans with a spike have a dryish character to them too. Its no big deal, people just get used to it.

post #2009 of 3844

 

I mean it's not a bad place to have a spike, it's actually one of the best:

 

frequencyresponse.jpg

 

 

post #2010 of 3844

It sort of mimics the fletcher munson loudness curve for low level listening. The higher the volume one listens, the flatter the response should be (plus figure hrtf/DF eq, etc...)

 

Fletcher-Munson.gif

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