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Shure SRH 940 impression and support thread - Page 113

post #1681 of 3844

 

Will a cassette tape walkman be OK? I only listen to Elvis.

 

post #1682 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldshoe99 View Post

Playing the HD-800 and Shure 940 out of an old Headroom amp (and you're not going to need anything better to hear the differences), the cymbals had more air and of course the bigger soundspace on the HD-800. I thought the cymbal clashes sounded somewhat dulled on the Shure 940. This is pretty much the same result as the test with the Porcupine Tree track, and like that one I can only say you have to listen yourself to appreciate the difference and/or figure out what it means. The Franz track may not be ideal for bass, but that was interesting too. The attacks of something there (low freq. kick drums, I dunno?) were slightly sharper sounding on the HD-800, but most other aspects of the bass were the same except for possibly the difference where people are talking about a "hole" in the 940's upper bass. I thought the 940 sounded better there than the HD-800, being a little less murky, and I suspect some people here (the ones who actually have these headphones) may prefer stronger and murky to clean and clear.

Bottom line - the differences are there and you can hear them, but they are nowhere near as dramatic as many posts here say. Absolutely nowhere near. And I judge the quality of everyone's reporting here by the level of hysteria they've expressed on this subject. The more hysterical, the less credible. FYI.

We all have our opinions. I disagree with your assessments. I'm not sure who's the arbiter of credibility. But I haven't seen it yet.

I'm my opinion the HD800 is a worthy flagship headphone and outshines the 940 in numerous ways. Including bass impact and quality. YMMV
post #1683 of 3844

The SRH-940 is a better portable headphone, at the very least.

 

 

post #1684 of 3844

Well, I finally finished my first major review for a pair of headphones...ever! :D

 

Here it is

 

I apologize in advanced if it doesn't seem very technical, I'm still new to the high-fidelity world, but I did what I could. I know that you guys have more experience than me, but if you have any questions or comments, please feel free to shoot me a PM. I plan to essentially copy that post and place it as an official review for the SRH940 headphone page here.

post #1685 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by baka1969 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldshoe99 View Post

Playing the HD-800 and Shure 940 out of an old Headroom amp (and you're not going to need anything better to hear the differences), the cymbals had more air and of course the bigger soundspace on the HD-800. I thought the cymbal clashes sounded somewhat dulled on the Shure 940. This is pretty much the same result as the test with the Porcupine Tree track, and like that one I can only say you have to listen yourself to appreciate the difference and/or figure out what it means. The Franz track may not be ideal for bass, but that was interesting too. The attacks of something there (low freq. kick drums, I dunno?) were slightly sharper sounding on the HD-800, but most other aspects of the bass were the same except for possibly the difference where people are talking about a "hole" in the 940's upper bass. I thought the 940 sounded better there than the HD-800, being a little less murky, and I suspect some people here (the ones who actually have these headphones) may prefer stronger and murky to clean and clear.
Bottom line - the differences are there and you can hear them, but they are nowhere near as dramatic as many posts here say. Absolutely nowhere near. And I judge the quality of everyone's reporting here by the level of hysteria they've expressed on this subject. The more hysterical, the less credible. FYI.
We all have our opinions. I disagree with your assessments. I'm not sure who's the arbiter of credibility. But I haven't seen it yet.
I'm my opinion the HD800 is a worthy flagship headphone and outshines the 940 in numerous ways. Including bass impact and quality. YMMV

Opinions matter only under two conditions: When they're informed and when they're honest. For informed, I have owned Sennheiser 565, 580, 600, 650 and 800. Grado 325, Beyerdynamic DT1350, Stax SRX-MK3, Phiaton MS400, Shure 940, Vmoda M80, B&W P5, and perhaps a couple others. I have quite a lot of music experience, some playing, but mostly listening. I know good sound, and I know how to compare headphones to find specific differences. For honesty, I gave the HD-800 the edge in both of the tests users requested here. So I think my credibility is quite good, since I don't just "throw out" an opinion without backing it up with facts. I have seen much posting here saying "my opinion is...." but little else that would help purchasers make an informed choice.

After doing my tests, I played the two tracks mentioned previously on the 940, and played them several times over as a reality check on overall sound quality. If I hadn't known I was using the 940, it could just as easily have been the HD-800 - that's how close they sound. Very, very close. Now if someone disagrees, what is that worth? Nothing, really. If someone wants to test them for technical performance, that's just splendid too. But none of that changes what I hear, and it won't change what other people hear (i.e. those who report from honesty and being informed).
post #1686 of 3844

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

Well, I finally finished my first major review for a pair of headphones...ever! :D

 

Here it is

 

I apologize in advanced if it doesn't seem very technical, I'm still new to the high-fidelity world, but I did what I could. I know that you guys have more experience than me, but if you have any questions or comments, please feel free to shoot me a PM. I plan to essentially copy that post and place it as an official review for the SRH940 headphone page here.


That's the first time I've seen someone put a lenghty review in an edited post, you might want to "quote" it so it shows up at the current end of that thread.

 

You have pretty good taste in music, apart from all that mandopop.

 

 

post #1687 of 3844

So, I received my Shure SRH940's on September 7, 2011. Yay!

 

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This is my first time posting a major review of an audio product and it addresses many of the questions I had when I was searching for my next major headphone. I hope this review is useful to both newcomers and veterans of Head-Fi. I am still learning about all of the technical terms and details of how to describe a headphone's sound signature, but I will try my best to convey my thoughts.

 

 

 

Where did I purchase my SRH940's?

Short: Headphones.com

 

Long: I bought the 940's from Headphones.com with a 15% off-discount for a total of $255 USD. I would personally like to thank Mr. David Mahler from Headphones.com for assisting me through the ordering process as the website, for some reason, wasn't accepting the discount code.

 

 

 

What comes with the SRH940's?

I posted a silent unboxing of the 940's on YouTube. It's not the best of quality, using only a digital camera, but it gets the point across.

 

These headphones have a lot of things bundled in the rather large box (see the section about the 940's lying flat for more details).

 

Inside the box:

Official product manual

2 year limited warranty

Large hard-foam/plastic storage case

Shure SRH940 headphones

4 velour pads total (two on the headphones, two extras)

9.84 ft. (3 m) detachable coiled cable (when coiled it's around 3.5 ft or 1 meter) with 3.5 mm gold-plated straight jack

8.2 ft. (2.5 m) detachable straight cable with 3.5 mm gold-plated straight jack

1/4 in. (6.35 mm) gold-plated stereo audio jack (screw on)

 

Headphone specifications (from the Shure official website)

40 mm drivers

42 ohm impedence

5 Hz - 30 kHz frequency range

320 g mass (without the cable attached)

 

With an extra cable and replacement pair of ear pads, I'm sure the 940's were packaged with durability in mind. The hard storage case feels like hard foam on the outside, almost like a plastic material. The inside is mostly lined with some sort of fabric, and a foam ring is in the middle to hold the headphones in place when inside the case in addition to a detachable cable. There is a Velcro-secured compartment for the storage of the extra velour ear pads, and a nylon pouch is attached to the inside lid to store the second cable and 1/4 in. stereo jack.

 

 

 

Some safety warnings about the SRH940's.

Short: "This product contains a chemical known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm."

 

Long: The 940's were made in China. On behalf of those who are concerned about products containing lead or other tainted materials, inside of the official product manual for the 940's, there is a warning label that states "this product contains a chemical known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm."

 

I don't want to cause panic to whoever is reading this, but I just wanted to post this as a heads up, as it did surprise me. The cables of the 940's did feel a bit powdery to me out of the package, and I was certain to wash my hands after I used the headphones for safety precautions.

 

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How comfortable are the SRH940's?

Short: Very comfortable, heavy, but padding helps with the weight.

 

Long: For a full-sized headphone, the circum-aural (the ear pads surround the ears) 940's are very comfortable. The clamp force is moderate, not too tight, not too loose. I found that the squishy velour pads help relieve the clamping force. Compared to the 940's brother, the SRH840's, they are actually heavier by measurement. Don't let that fool you though, I found the 940's to be lighter on my head than the 840's. It might be because of the cushioned bumps located on the 940's headband, which the 840's lacked. Despite others' opinions about the 940's having the same "crown of death" comfort effect as some AKG headphones, I found the headband quite comfortable. I do have to mention that the headband+weight of the headphones does cause me to have "flat baseball cap hair" if I wear the 940's long enough.

 

DSCN160999.jpg

 

The 940's have marked levels on the headband to make it easy to adjust one side of the headband equal to the other side. I have a small-ish sized head and I find that the 940's are most comfortable with the headband set at size 2 (out of 10) on both sides, so the 940's will fit on most heads.

 

The velour ear pads are a huge welcome to me. I've tried a good amount pleather/leather headphones at my local Guitar Center store and I found most of them to be uncomfortable, not to mention how quickly they heated up. I don't know if it was the pleather ear pads of the 840's, but I found that the 940's didn't clamp as hard on my head as the 840's did.

 

 

 

How comfortable are the SRH940's while wearing glasses?

Short: They feel about the same as without glasses on.

 

Long: To me the 940's are still very comfortable even with glasses on. I have glasses with thick arms, and even with that, the 940's squishy velour pads conform to the glasses.

 

 

 

Can the velour pads be cleaned?

Short: Yes, but it's trickier to clean than leather/pleather pads.

 

Long: One thing I do like about pleather/leather ear pads is that they are relatively easy to clean and maintain. I found that velour ear pads tend to attract dust, lint, and other small particles found on my desk. I haven't found a super effective method to clean them, but using a clean, lint-free, cotton shirt does a decent job of cleaning the particles.

 

 

 

How do you remove/replace the SRH940's ear pads?

Short: Twist pads, pull one side off first, then other. Reverse the process to put back on.

 

Long: Essentially the velour pads have a pleather lip on the back of the ear pad that holds the pad to the headphone's ear cup. The ear pads can spin in place if you twist the velour pads. While twisting, if you gently lift one end of the velour pad, the pleather flap holding the pad to the headphone will slide out. I found that getting the pads back in place is kind of tricky, as you can see in my silent unboxing video. You basically reverse the process to take the pad out except getting the pleather flap into the ear cups' slot can be tricky (at least it was for me).

 

 

 

How well do the SRH940's isolate noise?

Short: Less isolation than in-ear monitors or pleather/leather ear pads, but they still isolate pretty well.

 

Long: For a closed headphone, the 940's provide decent noise isolation. They don't isolate as much as in-ear monitors nor pleather/leather, but they still do a good job. I can still hear surrounding noises while wearing them, but I find that to be good so that I can be more aware of my surroundings.

 

 

 

How durable are the SRH940's?

Short: They seem durable, although some parts do squeak when adjusted. Extra bundled pads and cable are a welcome addition.

 

Long: Despite the 940's being made of plastic for the most part (the outer ear piece and the SHURE logo feel metal to me), the 940's feel pretty durable. The swivel and folding mechanisms on the 940's do squeak a little when I move them, but I don't think that will cause problems in the future (I hope). As I mentioned earlier, the extra ear pads and cables are good as backups should the first set break or malfunction. Shure does provide a 2 year limited warranty with the 940's, covering only product defects and not normal wear-and-tear damage.

 

 

 

How portable are the SRH940's?

Short: Very portable as a full-sized headphone. Detachable cable prevents cable strain.

 

Long: The 940's fold up pretty neatly, similar to the Beats by Dre headphones, making them fairly portable headphones (without using the hard storage case). One side of the headphone folds inward while the other side folds right on top of it (either side can be folded first, the order does not matter). The detachable cable makes storing the 940's a breeze without having to worry about the cable-ends being stressed or bent.

 

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Do the SRH940's lie flat (on a surface)?

Short: No, a spring mechanism and angled headband prevent them from lying flat.

 

Long: Although there is a swivel mechanism that allows the ear cups to swivel 90 degrees, there is one strange detail about the 940's swivel mechanism. There seems to be a spring mechanism that naturally prevents the 940's ear cups from rotating the full 90. As a result of this mechanism, the 940's are actually pretty large when left by itself, hence why the storage case is large. It is convenient to place the headphones directly from your head to a surface so that the ear pads lie on the surface rather than the top or sides of the ear cups.

 

Natural lying position ear cups facing upward (note that the headphones do not swivel flat with the drivers pointing upward due to the spring mechanism)

DSCN1600.jpeg

 

Natural lying position ear cups facing downward (note that the headphones do not lie with the drivers pointing downward flat due to the spring mechanism naturally pushing against the ear cups from swiveling the full 90 degrees)

DSCN1601.jpeg

 

Pushing the ear cups to swivel the full 90 degrees (note that even with the ear cups fully swiveled at 90 degrees, the headband is actually 'bent' downward so that they do not lie completely flat)

DSCN1604.jpeg

 

 

 

If the SRH940's ear cups do not swivel 90 degrees naturally, then how do they look on one's neck?

Short: Wear them backwards on your neck.

 

Long: Moving the headphones from listening position (on your ears normally) to your neck, the ear pads face upward and actually dig into my chin/neck. This is uncomfortable and I can barely move my head without bumping into the velour pads.

 

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However, moving the headphones from listening position, turning them around 180 degrees, and then placing them on my neck so that the ear pads rest on my shoulder, they are much more comfortable to wear.

 

DSCN16099.jpg

 

 

 

Do the SRH940's require amplifier to sound good, or can they be run straight out of an iPod?

Short: An amp is not needed and an iPod provides sufficient juice to power the 940's.

 

Long: No they do not require an amp to sound decent and they are capable of running straight out of an iPod.

 

 

How do the SRH940's sound?

Setup: Unibody aluminum Macbook (FLAC files played in VLC with flat EQ, with the exception of the picture below); iPod Touch 2G (320 kbps CBR)

 

Tracks or albums used during the review:

Deems Tsutakawa - Deems Greatest Hits (jazz)

Pet Shop Boys - The Most Incredible Thing (electronic/orchestra)

Ottmar Liebert - Up Close (binaural acoustic)

Hungarian Chamber Orchestra - Vivaldi/Geminiani Guitar Concertos/Sonatas (orchestra classical)

Mongo Santamaria - Montreux Heat (Latin jazz/percussion)

Fighter X - Unreleased (chiptune)

Trash80 - Icarus (chiptune)

Vitas - Philosophy of Miracle (Russian pop/opera)

Usher - My Way (R&B)

Vince Guaraldi Trio - A Charlie Brown Christmas (piano jazz)

Chiaki Ishikawa - Uninstall (Japanese vocal pop)

Gackt - Diabolos (Japanese rock)

Franz Ferdinand - Tonight (indie rock)

High and Mighty Color - Swamp Man (Japanese alternative metal)

Dazzle Vision - To the Next (Japanese visual-kei screamo)

Lia - Tori no Uta (Anime soundtrack)

Ayana - Last Regrets (Anime soundtrack)

Twelve Girls Band - 敦煌,奇迹 (Chinese folk)

S.H.E - Play, Shero, Super Star (Mandaring Chinese vocal pop)

Hebe Tien - To Hebe (Mandarin Chinese vocal pop)

Joey Yung - Ten Most Wanted, EP2, 容祖兒, 姚珏 & 莫拉維亞交響樂團 (Cantonese Chinese pop, Cantonese Chinese pop/orchestra)

Harlem Yu - 哈林天堂 (Mandarin Chinese pop)

Jane Zhang - 我爱邓丽君,改变 (older Mandarin Chinese vocal pop, modern Mandarin Chinese vocal pop)

Fish Leong - 崇拜,愛的大遊行 Live全記錄,燕尾蝶:下定愛的決心 (Mandarin Chinese pop)

Rainie Yang - 半熟宣言 (Chinese vocal pop)

Joanna Wang - Start From Here (Mandarin Chinese/English folk)

Jolin Tsai - J-Top 冠軍精選,J1演唱會影音全記錄,Myself,舞娘 (Mandarin Chinese pop)

Sammi Cheng - 信者得愛 (Mandarin Chinese vocal pop)

Eason Chan - DUO 陳奕迅 2010 演唱會,The 1st Eleven Years 然後呢?,U87 (Mandarin Chinese vocal pop, Cantonese Chinese vocal pop)

 

 

Initial impressions:

Short: Great extension on both ends of the sound spectrum. Lows are present but seem quiet compared to the mids and highs. They lack the bass punch that most headphones have. Mids seem laid back and upper-mids are more forward. Vocals sound very good with the 940's. Highs are detailed and are the most prominent of the 940's. Despite the highs being prominent, they handle sibilance quite well, though they might be fatiguing to some.

 

Long:

Lows

Being the first pair of headphones over $100 USD I've owned, my initial impressions of these 'phones are just about on par with everyone else; they seem 'bass shy' in the sense that they don't have the mid-bass 'thump' that I'm used to hearing (especially coming from Sennheiser CX-300's). However, there seems to be very good bass extension. Is this what neutral bass is supposed to sound like? I found that with a slight increase in the lower end with an EQ (about a 3-5 dB gain at around 60-130 Hz) is good enough for me. That said, some electronic tracks sound odd with the 940's since they lack the mid-bass 'thump thump' effect. Ladytron, however, sounds all right with the 940's since her songs feature her voice.

 

Screenshot2011-09-09at2.07.26AM.png

 

Mids

Vocals seem forward and very clear, which is what I was looking for in my next headphone. Female vocals indeed do sound brilliant with these headphones. Guitars and congas also sound very good with the 940's. Rock music sounds fantastic with the 940's with the prominent highs and forward vocals.

 

Highs

The highs are definitely more prominent than any headphone I've owned so far, but not to the extent where it hurts my ears (my ears are sensitive to sibilance). I find that the 940's handle sibilance quite well actually. Some of the sibilant tracks I have don't sound as sibilant to my ears with the 940's as they were with the CX-300's. Most brass instruments sound great with the 940's so they are an ideal match-up for jazz.

 

Soundstage

The soundstage is pretty decent for a closed headphone. I found it to be wider than the ATH-M50's and the Sennheiser HD25-1-ii, having better instrument separation and air between the instruments played. They I haven't tried them for gaming yet, but I was going to try them out soon.

 

All in all, my first impressions of the 940's are impressive. The lack of the bass thump is my biggest complaint, but I can manage it.

 

 

Final impressions:

Short: Bass is more noticeable but still quieter than the rest of the sound spectrum. Highs are tamer and not as fatiguing. Some rock music doesn't sound right with the 940's and some brass instruments for jazz can sound harsh. Can be used for gaming, but I haven't heard a serious gamer's headphone before so I can't really tell you what's good and what's not good for a gaming headphone. Overall, I notice some imperfections in some of my music and I noticed details in the upper frequencies that I didn't notice before. Poorly recorded tracks and/or low bit-rate tracks are noticeable with the 940's.

 

Long: After about 50 hours of use, the sound signature of the 940's seemed to be a bit tamer. After listening to my music more carefully, I can hear some of the imperfections of my tracks. It might be because of the clearer high notes, but I'm really starting to hear more details in the songs I listen to. Just for the sake of testing, I tried playing a 192 kbps track from the Hungarian Chamber Orchestra's album listed above and it sounded pretty bad with the 940's. I think they call this feature "unforgiving" in terms of describing a headphone.

Lows

The lows/lower-mids seemed more noticeable than before, although they are is still relatively quiet and laid back compared to the rest of the sound spectrum. I find that the bass isn't focused on the mid-bass, but more on the lower-bass. I keep thinking the bass can be described as not the clubbing type of bass (mid-bass), but more like deep sound rolling thunder (lower-bass). I actually prefer this kind of bass since it's not the kind of bass I get to hear every day (so many young people seem to have a liking for that mid-bass). Despite that, classical music sounds fantastic with these headphones. The bass required for most classical music isn't the clubbing type of bass, so the rolling-thunder bass of the 940's work quite well for this genre of music. However, some rock tracks may sound odd with the 940's due to their lack of sufficient mid-bass and emphasized highs.

 

Mids

I didn't mention this before, but most of the mids seem to be forward. Guitars and higher-pitched instruments such as violins and pianos all seem to take the front stage. Vocals still sound excellent on the 940's, both male and female. However, due to the emphasis of the 940's highs and upper-mids, female vocals are absolutely amazing with the 940's. I really like the way pianos are presented with these headphones. I found that if you have pop music that emphasizes vocals over bass, the 940's do a sufficient job at presenting that type of pop music.

 

Highs

The upper-mids/highs seemed to be toned down slightly so that they aren't as fatiguing as they used to be, but are still the most noticeable sounds from these headphones. Sometimes the highs can be a bit harsh on the ears such as trumpets, although I've always found trumpets to be too much for my ears. Jazz music also works well with the 940's for the most part.

 

Soundstage

For gaming, I found the 940's to be adequate for the games I play. I mainly play computer games via Steam (Spiral Knights, Portal 2, Team Fortress 2). The explosions are present, but it, again, lacks the 'thump' of the mid-bass. To me, the explosions sound good enough but I haven't heard a serious gamer's headphone before, so I can't really tell you what's good and what's not good. I am able to hear other players' footsteps during game play, so I can locate players more easily than I could with the CX-300's (which had lots of bass but a rather small soundstage).

 

 

 

Overall, I am really enjoying these headphones. They have nearly all of the attributes I wanted from my first major headphone purchase. For a closed, comfortable, decent-soundstage, deep low-bass, foldable, highly-detailed, mid/high focused, portable headphone at $275 USD street price, I would recommend this headphone.

 

Thank you for taking the time to read or glance over my review. I hope this review is helpful in some way or another. I'm not too experienced in the world in high-fidelity sound (this is my first major headphone purchase), and I know it's not the most detailed review you've read in terms of describing the sound signature, but I tried my best.

 



 


Edited by miceblue - 9/19/11 at 6:25pm
post #1688 of 3844
Nice review.

Thank you for sharing it with us.

I don't know if I'll write a review or not myself..

I agree with your impression that the shure logo is metal.. as well as the closed side of the cans.. they feel "cool" to the touch whereas the rest of them doesn't.


I find myself listening to tracks that I think will sound good on these 'phones - . a lot of folk (Dylan, baez, etc.), country music by female artists , jewel, sarah McLachlan, Norah Jones, etc.
Edited by Robobandit - 9/18/11 at 10:53pm
post #1689 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldshoe99 View Post


Opinions matter only under two conditions: When they're informed and when they're honest. For informed, I have owned Sennheiser 565, 580, 600, 650 and 800. Grado 325, Beyerdynamic DT1350, Stax SRX-MK3, Phiaton MS400, Shure 940, Vmoda M80, B&W P5, and perhaps a couple others. I have quite a lot of music experience, some playing, but mostly listening. I know good sound, and I know how to compare headphones to find specific differences. For honesty, I gave the HD-800 the edge in both of the tests users requested here. So I think my credibility is quite good, since I don't just "throw out" an opinion without backing it up with facts. I have seen much posting here saying "my opinion is...." but little else that would help purchasers make an informed choice.

After doing my tests, I played the two tracks mentioned previously on the 940, and played them several times over as a reality check on overall sound quality. If I hadn't known I was using the 940, it could just as easily have been the HD-800 - that's how close they sound. Very, very close. Now if someone disagrees, what is that worth? Nothing, really. If someone wants to test them for technical performance, that's just splendid too. But none of that changes what I hear, and it won't change what other people hear (i.e. those who report from honesty and being informed).

Read any of my reviews and look at my profile of past and current headphone equpiment. I'll put my credibility up against yours easily. If I decide to write a review about the 940 vs the HD800, rest assured it will be thorough. As this juncture I don't feel the desire. I have provided plenty of information within this thread.
post #1690 of 3844
Excellent job miceblue. Thank you for the effort.
post #1691 of 3844

Nice review miceblue! Their brilliance with brass and female vocals, the unforgivingness, the balance of the bass, the oddness with a lot of rock tracks - spot on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by donunus View Post


I would really love to read that. It would even be better if there was a big "sub 500 dollar closed can" comparison on innerfidelity. I have yet to find the one for me. The 940s are detailed but I feel they are a little thin and bright in balance while the 840s are a little thick and bright while being dry. I really liked the den on d1001 but thought they were also a little thin sounding... Maybe the creative Aurvana live can slaughter these shires, who knows smily_headphones1.gif

Okay, for the 840s I get the thick and bright sounding part, but dry? confused.gif

post #1692 of 3844

yes dry. It doesn't have the air and decay that the 940 has.

post #1693 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by baka1969 View Post

Read any of my reviews and look at my profile of past and current headphone equpiment. I'll put my credibility up against yours easily. If I decide to write a review about the 940 vs the HD800, rest assured it will be thorough. As this juncture I don't feel the desire. I have provided plenty of information within this thread.
You talk as though you were in some kind of credibility contest, or as though yours was challenged. None of that concerns me. Whether I post here again or not will have nothing to do with you, only with a specific subject and the info I provide to the readers here.
post #1694 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacedonianHero View Post

^ Actually the Q-Jays are quite nice earphones when I heard them. But fell apart with instrumental separation and sound imaging with a wee too much treble for me.



Which brings us to the point that there is still something the graphs won't tell us. Just making a point how a justification can't ultimately be made with measurements.

 

Still hesitant about square-wave response graphs... I think, if accurate, Purrin's graphs with decays over the whole spectrum tell more. 

post #1695 of 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldshoe99 View Post


You talk as though you were in some kind of credibility contest, or as though yours was challenged. None of that concerns me. Whether I post here again or not will have nothing to do with you, only with a specific subject and the info I provide to the readers here.


I believe it was you that claimed you were much more credible than Tyll, which engaged others to challenge you. You've not proved anything yet I'm afraid. "Honesty" is an illusion on the internet. One can say anything he/she wants, especially when we're trudging across something so subjective and prone to psychological influence. 

 

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