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post #76 of 118

Man, this thread is starting to resemble a post apocalyptic survival forum.

post #77 of 118
Thread Starter 

It from all the television. 

post #78 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by mralexosborn View Post

It from all the television. 



It's in the air, it's in the music...people are raging against the machine. People want their power back.

 

post #79 of 118
Thread Starter 

These riots look promising, the ones in Egypt and Tunisia that is. 

post #80 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by mralexosborn View Post

These riots look promising, the ones in Egypt and Tunisia that is. 


I've always wanted to be in a riot. Ever since I was a kid.

post #81 of 118
Thread Starter 

You shouldn't take things so lightly. 93% of Egyptians no longer have high speed internet as per order of the government to the ISP's. No internet? WHAT?!

post #82 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by mralexosborn View Post

You shouldn't take things so lightly. 93% of Egyptians no longer have high speed internet as per order of the government to the ISP's. No internet? WHAT?!


RIOT!!!

 

Also, I am dead serious. If shit goes down within a 150 mile radius of my house, I'll be there.

post #83 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobSaysHi View Post




I've always wanted to be in a riot. Ever since I was a kid.



 

No, you don't.

I was caught in the middle of the '92 LA Riots.

Not something I'd like to experience again.
post #84 of 118
Thread Starter 

I guess he is envious of Europeans who seem to riot on a whim?

post #85 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobSaysHi View Post


I've always wanted to be in a riot. Ever since I was a kid.


 

No, you don't.I was caught in the middle of the '92 LA Riots.Not something I'd like to experience again.


Quite true. I remember being in India and we just got to school that day, and not a half hour later, the principal announced that they had to close school down early and get all the students out of school safely because riots were starting in the city (A prominent leader of the powerful, and very, very conservative party Shiv Sena (Bal Thackeray) was just released from prison and riots were forming everywhere, both for and against him). Students who's parents had drivers had to have their parents notified so they could arrange alternative transport, all because the school stated, quite clearly, that 'they could not guarantee the safety of the students on or outside of the school grounds if the riots moved to that part of town. My mom called to tell me to get my sister and move out with my friend and his kid brother because their driver was already on the way and she told him to take us all to his parent's place where she would meet us because she said the riots were already moving into the area where our house was and she was planning on getting out and all of us were going to spend the night at my friend's place. A trip from school to his place that normally used to take 10 minutes tops took nearly an hour or longer because traffic was so bad due to all the schools trying to get all the students out at the same time. Needless to say, That alone was bad enough: I'm quite glad I didn't have to deal with that riot upfront.



 

post #86 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by mralexosborn View Post

You shouldn't take things so lightly. 93% of Egyptians no longer have high speed internet as per order of the government to the ISP's. No internet? WHAT?!



So I'm guessing no Egyption head fier's for a couple of days eek.gif

post #87 of 118
Thread Starter 

I want to be a petroleum engineer. I just thought I should throw that out there. XD

post #88 of 118
Oh, I think you should be an audiologist. biggrin.gif There will be a lot of business from this generation.

As for riots... no thanks. At the time of the LA Riots in 1992, I was in school at USC (in South Central) and at night, I worked at UPS with two fraternity brothers. We had a job where we took care of downloading DIADs (those tablets you sign) and acting as managers after the day managers left. It was an evening job.

The riots started around when we got to the center and we watched things go downhill on TV. We managed to get all the trucks and drivers back safely and sent them home, fast. Then all the managers got together and we voted to close the facility. This was a Big Deal. UPS does not shut down lightly. This hub handled 300,000+ packages daily. Inventory there was into nine figures. We gathered up the keys to every truck and one manager took them home. Then we shut the hub tight and got out.

Me and my two brothers had to drive from Vernon to our house in South Central. I was driving, and it was the most terrifying drive of my life. There was burning and looting just feet away from us. Gunshots, too. I broke all sorts of traffic laws - the police were nowhere to be seen. We weren't sure if we'd make it. Fortunately, we did.

When we got to the fraternity house, we set up a patrol on the roof. A couple of the guys had guns and we set up shifts carrying them. Probably wouldn't have done much good, but it was all we could do. The rest of us went up there and watched the city burn around us. Not just in the distance, but a few blocks away. We didn't really talk about it, but we knew that we could die.

Riots might sound exciting, but if you've never been through something like this, it's terrifying. I was cold, clammy and shaking. So was everyone else. I'm not ashamed to admit it - I think most would react the same way. It's not unlike combat, and I've known quite a few vets who have seen action.

Even after it was over, we still had the Guard in the neighborhood. The local market had guys with M-16s out front and soldiers were in the neighborhood. I felt bad for them - ordinary folks who had to put on a uniform and pick up a rifle, taken away from their homes and families. We usually gave them cases of Coke, bags of chips, and occasionally brought them in for a meal. Nice guys, but it was something else to have military patrolling around. The curfews were a shock, too.

There's no glamour or sexiness to a loss of civil order. It's awful. If you find yourself in something like this, you won't be joking around or acting macho. It will scare the crap out of you and make you thankful for having a peaceful society. I see the photos of Egypt and it touches a nerve, deep down. I feel awful for the people there. I know what they're going through.
post #89 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

There's no glamour or sexiness to a loss of civil order. It's awful. If you find yourself in something like this, you won't be joking around or acting macho. It will scare the crap out of you and make you thankful for having a peaceful society. I see the photos of Egypt and it touches a nerve, deep down. I feel awful for the people there. I know what they're going through.



I get where your coming from Erik but what sparked the 92 riots and rioters was those folks were in essence giving voice to what they thought was injustice. They felt like the system completely and utterly failed them. Isnt that essentially what's driving the stuff in Egypt and more recently Tunisia. There is a good deal of civil unrest in a lot of places. We got folks showing up at political rallies here with rifles strapped to their back wearing tee shirts that read from time to time the tree of liberty needs watered with blood; or carrying signs that read this time we came unarmed. Politicians giving voice to the notion that maybe it's time for 2nd ammendment solutions. IMO there is something very unsettling developing in the world.

post #90 of 118
Thread Starter 

Sorry to butt in to a discussion that may be out of my league but I respectfully disagree with you Brian.

 

I think what inspired Egypt WAS Tunisia. If revolution works in a neighboring country, over a weekend nonetheless, then it should work for you. I think that is what they had on their mind. This is also why many fear this will spread to other countries, i.e. Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and even Iran (I am doubtful myself though). I don't see people with rifles strapped to their backs and people calling for violence, at least not any sane people. I know you may bring the shooter in Arizona up, but I believe that is an isolated incident in that he was mentally ill. I can understand why one would say this act would be inspired by people like Glenn Back but only if they are completely ignorant of what his program is about. The Tea Party is not about violence they are about reform. In my opinion I would actually say that have no power but are somewhat of an invisible hand when it comes to politics, i.e. Rand Paul. Other than Tea Partiers I really don't see any other group rallying against the current order of things. Also, as a serious question, can you cite one example that politicians are calling for "2nd amendment solutions"? I would really like to know if there are; I would like to know about any hidden social unrest that is invisible to the naked eye.

 

To conclude what I am trying to say: this is not the first "unsettling development" BUT it certainly won't be the last.

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