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Headphone Burn-in - Page 2

post #16 of 82

That's not burn in, it's unusual cruelty to a pair of headphones... DC ... eek.gifeek.gifeek.gif !?

 

By the way, I once ruined a pair of headphone using gasoline and matches to burn them in, didn't sound good at all after that beerchug.gif.

post #17 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by khaos974 View Post

That's not burn in, it's unusual cruelty to a pair of headphones... DC ... eek.gifeek.gifeek.gif !?

 

By the way, I once ruined a pair of headphone using gasoline and matches to burn them in, didn't sound good at all after that beerchug.gif.



If they were the Dre Beats then usually they'd sound BETTER after that.. weird :P

post #18 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by El_Doug View Post

ok mr smarty pants, here's your proof: 

 

when I tried to use DC for super quick burn-in, my headphones stopped working completely after just 20 hours of the burn-in process! 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

Burn-in is ritual and ceremony. It's the difference between an elaborate marriage and tying the knot down at the courthouse. The end result is the same. It doesn't really matter.

For those who disagree, please provide one example of burn-in being done the wrong way and damaging the sound of a pair of headphones.

 

As a mod, you should know by now that break-in is a chasm from which there is no escape.

post #19 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by El_Doug View Post

ok mr smarty pants, here's your proof: 

 

when I tried to use DC for super quick burn-in, my headphones stopped working completely after just 20 hours of the burn-in process! 
 





 

Oh, come on. Everyone knows that DC is safe and harmless.

Why, look at that Livermore Centennial Bulb in the firehouse. It's been burning for over 100 years off clean DC.

And all those experiments where Edison proved how dangerous AC is. He even electrocuted an elephant with AC to show how dangerous it is.
post #20 of 82

Baby Facepalm

post #21 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prog Rock Man View Post

Then testing has also found that if a speaker is rested, sometimes that can take days or even longer, it will return to its original condition. So burn in stays if a speaker is regularly used and can happen again and again if the speaker is rested.


I don't think I've heard that one before, but it makes TOTAL sense.

 

Just found this incredibly interesting page of manufacturer's responses to the burn-in question.  The range of responses is interesting- not sure if it has to do with design, listening or marketing philosophies.  It's probably a mixture of all of the above.  Personally I think getting acclimated to the 'sound' is a major factor here and it doesn't hurt the retailers to say "just hold onto it for a while longer."

 

http://www.matrixhifi.com/ENG_contenedor_rodajealtavoces.htm

post #22 of 82

The Matrix Hifi link is excellent. I liked the response that speakers burn in because audiophiles tell us they do!

post #23 of 82

Burn in is a simple procedure to make things comfortable for the diaphragm. A newly made diaphragm is not as elastic as a burned-in one. That's all to it. nothing else actually (in my knowledge).

 

Try something, buy a new rubber band see how flexible it is, then continuously flex it and again and again for a few days see the difference. The same thing is involved in headphones.

 

Rohan

post #24 of 82

^^^^

This

x lots

 

The voice of reason has spoken.

post #25 of 82

 

Quote:
 Originally Posted by El_Doug View Post

ok mr smarty pants, here's your proof: 

 

when I tried to use DC for super quick burn-in, my headphones stopped working completely after just 20 hours of the burn-in process! 
 

 El-Doug,

I would say that you are an incorrigible wit.

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 incorrigible adj. Incapable of being corrected or reformed:  

 btw , I knew someone that thought he was a wit - He was half right............

post #26 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by rohan575 View Post

Burn in is a simple procedure to make things comfortable for the diaphragm. A newly made diaphragm is not as elastic as a burned-in one. That's all to it. nothing else actually (in my knowledge).

 

Try something, buy a new rubber band see how flexible it is, then continuously flex it and again and again for a few days see the difference. The same thing is involved in headphones.

 

Rohan


Then, if the diaphragm is left to rest, sometimes taking days if not weeks, it returns to its original state. Burn in is not a one off. If a speaker is used regularly, it will retain its burned in state. If not, burn in will happen again.

post #27 of 82

quite correct to go deeper google "Young's modulus of elasticity", every elastic material even plastic materials have some value of Y or Young's modulus, since speakers have a larger diameter they need more "stress" or work to be done on them for the fibers in the material to be re-aligned in the best possible pattern to reduce strain on them.

 

Burn in is a repetitive process but the first one has maximum effect.  

post #28 of 82

always remember DC + HEADPHONE or any driver = BAAAAAAAD there is a conductor in your headphone rated at 32 Ohm or 16 Ohm imagine a voltage of say 2V DC will push 62.5 mA and your headphone will ac hive a power of around 125mW not quite good when this at DC. So a burn can be simple music and no need for complex waveforms. 

post #29 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pratt View Post
Just listen and enjoy right out of the box, and, if you don't, 1000 hours down the road you still won't like the sound (unless it "grows on" you psychoacoustically) because it will NOT change: get another headphone.


I absolutely agree with that.

post #30 of 82

Loved the Matrix link.  Interesting that the pro guys - ATC and JBL Pro - who eat or not by supplying other pros who eat or not based on real-world performance were the most no-nonsense.

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