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What decibel do you listen at?

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 

I'm currently using Foobar and AD700s, I was wondering what would be a safe volume to listen to music at?  I listen at -5.17 db and it feels like a concert in my ear. 

post #2 of 32

The only way to know is to use a SPL meter. Do a search on this topic for more info.

post #3 of 32

I don't know but generally unless it is just a really great song, I can still hear well enough to carry on a conversation with my headphones on. Grados are pretty awesome that way...don't have to turn them way up and still get decent sound. I hope the K701's I have coming are the same way. Even though I am pretty conservative with the volume...I still worry about my ears.

post #4 of 32
Yup, Foobar cannot tell you how loud you are actually listening. You need an SPL meter for this, as GreatDane said.

I listen at 80 db A weighted, peaks.
post #5 of 32

80 db is too loud for me, I usually listen at 70-75 dB average and peaks around 85 dB. Btw, I used my ipod decibel meter to measure this.


Edited by beamthegreat - 1/9/11 at 2:16am
post #6 of 32

Rockbox says 73 decibels. 

post #7 of 32

I'm guessing 80-90db with the headphones.

 

I like driving along to loud music though so I'm guessing my car is over 95-100db+

post #8 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by XxATOLxX View Post

 

I like driving along to loud music though so I'm guessing my car is over 95-100db+



If true, you're permanently damaging your hearing after about 2 ours at such a level, and that assumes that you have not had any other exposure to loud sounds that day.

 

Just for reference:

 

 OSHA TABLE G-16 - PERMISSIBLE NOISE EXPOSURES (1)
______________________________________________________________
                            |
  Duration per day, hours   | Sound level dBA slow response
____________________________|_________________________________
                            |
8...........................|                    90
6...........................|                    92
4...........................|                    95
3...........................|                    97
2...........................|                   100
1 1/2 ......................|                   102
1...........................|                   105
1/2 ........................|                   110
1/4  or less................|                   115
____________________________|________________________________
 Footnote(1) When the daily noise exposure is composed of two or
more periods of noise exposure of different levels, their combined
effect should be considered, rather than the individual effect of
each. If the sum of the following fractions: C(1)/T(1) + C(2)/T(2)
C(n)/T(n) exceeds unity, then, the mixed exposure should be
considered to exceed the limit value. Cn indicates the total time of
exposure at a specified noise level, and Tn indicates the total time
of exposure permitted at that level. Exposure to impulsive or impact
noise should not exceed 140 dB peak sound pressure level.

post #9 of 32

At my annual check up I asked to meet w/ an audiologist, convinced that years of loud music had taken it's toll. The results were shocking - that I was in fact in the normal range for a hearing adult. Knowing what range of sound I simply cannot hear will be helpful going forward, I definitely turned my volume way down too.

 

Take good care of your little eardrums friends.

post #10 of 32

I do my listening at approx 70dB zero weighted. What one would consider really low level listening.

post #11 of 32

low to mid 80's dBA is my usual listening level with headphones. sometimes i may crank it up into the low to mid 90's for a short while.

post #12 of 32

Rockbox will give you decibel levels?

Might have to take a look at that..

post #13 of 32

Guys, you CANNOT go by what any player tells you - it has no real way of knowing how loud the sound is, because it has to know the efficiency of the headphones in order to calculate it!  Maybe the Apple one would be accurate ONLY for the Apple-supplied earbuds, but that's all.  Otherwise, you have to use an SPL meter to measure.

post #14 of 32

180db I've been trying to blow up my eardrums for the longest hasn't worked.

post #15 of 32

Agreed. you need an SPL meter to know how loud you're listening.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylab View Post

Guys, you CANNOT go by what any player tells you - it has no real way of knowing how loud the sound is, because it has to know the efficiency of the headphones in order to calculate it!  Maybe the Apple one would be accurate ONLY for the Apple-supplied earbuds, but that's all.  Otherwise, you have to use an SPL meter to measure.

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