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CES 2011: Sennheiser announces the CXC 700 digital noise-canceling ear-canal headphone  

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Sennheiser expands its large array of noise-cancelling headphones with a digital addition
Las Vegas, NV
 
01062011_image1.jpg

Audio specialist Sennheiser is expanding its broad line of noise-cancelling travel headphones with the CXC 700 ear-canal phone. The CXC 700 features Sennheiser’s exclusive NoiseGard™ digital system, which allows travelers to choose from three noise-cancelling modes optimized to reduce low, medium and high frequency noise.
 

Mode 1 absorbs low-frequency noise in particular (100 to 400 Hertz), such as engine noise from trains, buses or small passenger planes. Mode 2 focuses on cancelling noise in the medium frequency range (400 to 3,000 Hertz), which is caused mostly by air-conditioning systems in large passenger aircraft or office buildings. Mode 3 has a particularly wide frequency range (100 to 3,000 Hertz), and combines the noise-cancelling effect in the medium and low-frequency ranges. As a result, background noise with different noise components--such as that experienced in airports, railway stations or underground stations--can be effectively suppressed.
 

01062011_image2.jpg

“NoiseGard /digital is the consistent further development of Sennheiser's analog NoiseGard technology,” explained Daniel Chee, product manager for the Sennheiser Travel Line. “The possibility to select one of three different modes that are optimized for different environments considerably improves the noise-cancelling effect. Precise filters generate a result that is up to five times better than that of the analog system."
 

Perfect sound wherever you go
To ensure that you can enjoy top-quality sound while traveling--even when the NoiseGard function is deactivated--Sennheiser's proven acoustics guarantees a balanced, detailed sound image with a frequency response of 20 to 21,000 Hertz. Whether noise cancelling is switched on or off, the CXC 700 promises the same perfect sound quality at all times. And when the battery life is diminished, the CXC 700 continues to operate as a traditional headphone for continuous listening enjoyment. The earphones are perfectly matched to portable audio and video players and are also optimized for connection to in-flight entertainment systems.
 

01062011_image3.jpg

First-class comfort
Due to its compact size and ergonomic design, the CXC 700 not only fits into even the lightest luggage, it is also comfortable to wear when sleeping. Travelers can either drift off into another world while listening to relaxing music or enjoy perfect peace and quiet with the NoiseGard function activated.
 

The CXC 700 is operated using a control unit integrated into the cable. The control unit is used not only to select the three NoiseGard profiles and to regulate the volume but also to activate the Sennheiser TalkThrough function. This allows users to conduct a conversation with the person sitting next to them or with the cabin staff without the need to remove their earphones. Activation of the NoiseGard profiles and TalkThrough function are indicated by both an acoustic and a visual signal.
 

The high-end ear-canal phones are also equipped with all extras for relaxed and trouble-free traveling. The CXC 700 includes a set of ear adapters in three different sizes to guarantee a perfect fit and excellent noise suppression. An in-flight adapter and a ¼-inch (6.35 mm) jack plug adapter are also included for connection to both portable players and in-flight entertainment systems. The 4.5-foot-long (1.4 meter) cable offers sufficient freedom of movement in all situations. In addition to a small carrying case, the set also includes a diaphragm protector, a cleaning tool and an AAA battery.
 

The CXC 700 will be available in the US at selected consumer electronics retailers in early 2011.
 

The Sennheiser Group, with its headquarters in Wedemark near Hanover, Germany, is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of microphones, headphones and wireless transmission systems. The family-owned company, which was established in 1945, recorded sales of around €390 million in 2009. Sennheiser employs more than 2,100 people worldwide, and has manufacturing plants in Germany, Ireland and the USA. The company is represented worldwide by subsidiaries in France, Great Britain, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Denmark (Nordic), Russia, Hong Kong, India, Singapore, Japan, China, Canada, Mexico and the USA, as well as by long-term trading partners in many other countries. Also part of the Sennheiser Group are Georg Neumann GmbH, Berlin (studio microphones and monitor loudspeakers), and the joint venture Sennheiser Communications A/S (headsets for PCs, offices and call centers).
 

US Media Contacts:
 

Sennheiser Electronic Corp.
Rachel Smolin
Public Relations
(860) 434-9190, ext. 180
 

Hummingbird Media, Inc.
Jeff Touzeau
Public Relations
(914) 602-2913
hummingbirdmedia@mac.com
 

Global Media Contact:
 

Sennheiser electronic GmbH & Co. KG
Mareike Oer
Press and Public Relations
Consumer, audiology and aviation products
+49 5130 600 719
mareike.oer@sennheiser.com

 

 

 

post #2 of 19
Thread Starter 

Click on the images below to see full-sized versions:

 

sennheiser_cxc-700.jpg mode-1.jpg

 

mode-2.jpg mode-3.jpg

post #3 of 19

Meh. It seems okay. I would love to know how they sound.

post #4 of 19

how to interpret those graphs?

post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by matbhuvi View Post

how to interpret those graphs?



In these graphs you can see two lines with a colored area between. The area means how much noise can be blocked on that frequency on that NC mode.

Example: Graph 1. You can see right at the beginning, at 25 Hz, that it will only cancel 15 to 30dB aprox. This kind-of means that only noise from 15db to 30dB at 25Hz gets blocked. More technically, it means that the noise-cancelling itself only sends from 15dB to 30dB of a wave with that frequency. So if you have a noise with a frequency of 25Hz that's 35dB loud, the best chance you have is of only hearing 5dB of that specific noise.

 

On the other hand, at a noise frequency range of 100 - 200Hz, you can see this mode as much efficient: the higher and lower loudness blocker is wider, so it can cancel much better at that wavelenght.

post #6 of 19

Probably not that good, lol. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdraluck23 View Post

Meh. It seems okay. I would love to know how they sound.

post #7 of 19

Sennheiser could have done worse though. They could have signed a rapper and quadrupled the price.

post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdraluck23 View Post

Sennheiser could have done worse though. They could have signed a rapper and quadrupled the price.



Don't jinx it!

post #9 of 19

What is the point in all this 'noise cancellation' stuff, besides a marketing hook to hang more sales on?  I'm yet to hear an iem that doesn't drown out most of the outside world perfectly well, and anyone who's ever tried Etymotic iems knows you don't need any more isolation than they offer.

 

I just don't get it. Unless you're a pneumatic drill operator, what's the big deal?

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bennyboy71 View Post

What is the point in all this 'noise cancellation' stuff, besides a marketing hook to hang more sales on?  I'm yet to hear an iem that doesn't drown out most of the outside world perfectly well, and anyone who's ever tried Etymotic iems knows you don't need any more isolation than they offer.

 

I just don't get it. Unless you're a pneumatic drill operator, what's the big deal?


I have to disagree, being a huge fan of NC. I never tried Etymotics since they aren't even represented in Portugal -.-" but from what I gathered online, they do a fantastic job at isolation that pretty much removes the need for noise-cancellation, and still provide a great sound. However, if you take that logic to full-sized, it's quite more complicated. The best chance you have are with leather pads on a bulky headphone like Beyers, and those would get really sweaty really fast.

 

I take the subway to college everyday, and without noise-cancelling I wouldn't even bother turning my A845 on, I would have to boost the volume fully on. That stupid thing (the subway, not the IEMs) is really loud, and I doubt even Etys would block it as much as NC does. It works really well. I even prefer the stock IEMs with NC than any full-sized alternative (although there I also have to consider getting mugged =P ). I haven't noticed any fadding of sound in the music when I have the NC option on. If it is just a marketing strategy, please keep it up!

post #11 of 19

I have used my Etys while using a gas powered pressure washer. They completely drown it out--even while no music is playing. They will drown out the subway.

post #12 of 19

In my experience, the noise spectrum is the key. Passive IEMs (like Etys) work very well for me on all except for the real low frequencies. For airplanes, the noise varies greatly depending on the type of plane and where you're sitting. When sitting behind the engines, active NC (like on my Sony X) works better than the passive NC from my Ety ER6i in terms of loud rumble. Etys work better for crying babies, loud talkers, etc.

 

dana789

post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bennyboy71 View Post

What is the point in all this 'noise cancellation' stuff, besides a marketing hook to hang more sales on?  I'm yet to hear an iem that doesn't drown out most of the outside world perfectly well, and anyone who's ever tried Etymotic iems knows you don't need any more isolation than they offer.

 

I just don't get it. Unless you're a pneumatic drill operator, what's the big deal?



I haven't used Etymotic IEMs, but I have yet to find a universal IEM that will drown train noises. When listening to music on the train, the low-bass is often masked by the train. It would be wonderful to find IEMs that prevent this. But they have to sound good as well...

 

Do we know what price point these are going to be aimed at?

post #14 of 19

Will hardly be less than 80$. They look kind of cheap, but it's Senn's first NC model, and NC isn't that common yet (Sony being the main pioneer), so it will hardly be cheap.

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by LizardKing1 View Post


In these graphs you can see two lines with a colored area between. The area means how much noise can be blocked on that frequency on that NC mode.

Example: Graph 1. You can see right at the beginning, at 25 Hz, that it will only cancel 15 to 30dB aprox. This kind-of means that only noise from 15db to 30dB at 25Hz gets blocked. More technically, it means that the noise-cancelling itself only sends from 15dB to 30dB of a wave with that frequency. So if you have a noise with a frequency of 25Hz that's 35dB loud, the best chance you have is of only hearing 5dB of that specific noise.

 

On the other hand, at a noise frequency range of 100 - 200Hz, you can see this mode as much efficient: the higher and lower loudness blocker is wider, so it can cancel much better at that wavelenght.


Perfect..thanks for your time to explain that..

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